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Old 02-03-2019, 06:09 PM   #11
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I set out late figwort seeds this year too. Cant wait to get familiar with all these new (to me) plants.
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Old 02-04-2019, 09:08 AM   #12
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Huh, this species is one I'm not very familiar with, but I ought to be!
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Old 02-04-2019, 03:02 PM   #13
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The name 'Scrophularia' has been bouncing around in the back of my mind for the past couple of days and I finally figured out why.

Last spring while photographing bumble bees one of the plants in my yard that was consistently visited by bees was Pedicularis canadensis (Wood Betony). Wood betony is in the same family (Scrophulariaceae) as the figworts! Wood betony is a quite different form of plant, but it does have a somewhat similar small orchid-like flower.
https://www.prairiemoon.com/pedicula...n-nursery.html
https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=peca

The photos at the websites show a yellow flower, but wood betony also has a reddish version.

Winter Sowing 2018-p1080246_crop_2.jpg
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Old 02-04-2019, 04:21 PM   #14
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I've tried moving and growing those several times. Both the yellow and the red blossoming. Lil did I know back then that they required a host plant to attach to in order to survive... I really like those but isn't one to survive with what I've in the bed in which I had wanted them.

Were those in the wild or in your yard and if so, what type of plants are the near Newisc
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Old 02-04-2019, 09:48 PM   #15
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I have also been away too long. I neglect this wonderful group far too often and for far too long. I'm always happy to check back in and always tell myself that I won't wait so long in between visits....and then I do it again.
You an me, both. You nailed it--nailed me to a T...I feel the same way...and I don't know why I continue to wait so long between visits.

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I like to winter sow in November, before it gets too cold and "wintery" out there! I wait until I feel safe that temps are going to stay cold enough to prevent seeds from getting moldy. I set out the flats, cover them up and just wait for spring. If I had to do it in Jan or Feb, it probably wouldn't get done. I'm not a huge fan of being cold .
I am fine doing it in January or February...too many other things to do in November. I like to cover them with snow, and then forget about them until spring. ...but, I can never understand why I don't sow them during Christmas break. I guess I am just a procrastinator.
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Old 02-04-2019, 09:56 PM   #16
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This came up in my Facebook memories from 2 years ago.

...here's hoping I sort the seeds I collected...and plant them within a week or two.
Winter Sowing 2018-20190204_215358.jpg
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Old 02-04-2019, 10:00 PM   #17
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We,ve been putting a lot of seeds out to get ready for spring germination too. One newer one is Scrophularia lanceolata (Early Figwort). It's new to me in the sense that I haven't grown it before. I have seen it in the wild, and the closely related S. marilandica (Late Figwort) is in one of the pollinator gardens that we started.

Early figwort is described as a nectar rich plant that is supposed to attract many pollinators:
https://www.prairiemoon.com/scrophul...n-nursery.html
https://plants.usda.gov/core/profile?symbol=SCLA

The late figwort definitely attracts a lot of pollinators, I've seen bees fighting over its flowers! So I'm hopeful that the early figwort will be a welcome addition to the pollinator resources in my yard.
I was not familiar with figworts until a couple of years ago when some plugs were given to me from a native plant nursery I frequent. I'd have to look for tags or receipts to find the botanical name.

Hummingbirds are supposed to frequent this plant.
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Old 02-04-2019, 10:07 PM   #18
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Interesting how many members are interested in this (fairly) new to me native. (And nice to know that I'm not alone.)

I think it is not very showy which is likely why it wasn't necessarily on my radar.
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Old 02-05-2019, 12:43 PM   #19
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Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
I've tried moving and growing those several times. Both the yellow and the red blossoming. Lil did I know back then that they required a host plant to attach to in order to survive... I really like those but isn't one to survive with what I've in the bed in which I had wanted them.

Were those in the wild or in your yard and if so, what type of plants are the near Newisc
?
The wood betony is in our yard, but then most of our yard is kind of a wild prairie like area. They are in several locations throughout that area. The host plants that they are using are the native grasses, primarily little bluestem.

The first plants were transplants, and I was careful to keep thier host plants in good condition while doing the transplant. Since then a few additional wood betony plants have appeared; they self sowed from the seeds of the original plants.
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Old 02-05-2019, 01:02 PM   #20
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Interesting how many members are interested in this (fairly) new to me native. (And nice to know that I'm not alone.)

I think it is not very showy which is likely why it wasn't necessarily on my radar.
It's been a similar kind of experience for me. I think that it may be a natural evolution for people interested in the environment and native plants to move gradually from form to function when considering the value of a plant.

If a plant is good for pollinators it has my interest. If it's a natural supporting participant in an ecosystem I'm interested. Beauty is not irrelevant, but it has a much greater depth and broader scope than just the color of its flowers or the structure of its foliage.
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