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Old 10-06-2014, 09:29 AM   #11
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This is great information kchd and disuhan since I will be trying winter seed sowing. thanks!
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Old 10-06-2014, 12:30 PM   #12
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disuan,

I don't envy you all that transplanting; I never get around to it with all of mine.

As for the Aquelegia, I read that they need sunlight to germinate...so make sure you are not covering them.
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Old 10-06-2014, 07:14 PM   #13
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yea, I love the milkjugs. I also use 2-liter coke bottles and any other large plastic container. Go ahead and recycle the lid; you don't need it. Also, ask friends, family and co-workers to save plastic jugs for you. I like to leave a 1 inch section of plastic un-cut to act as a hinge on the plastic containers.

Yep, I think the liquid fertilizer is the way to go. Those seedlings need it asap. You can always buy organic liquid fertilizer, too. Also, I think it is important to make sure your potting mix is not sterile.Mycorrhizae fungi are SOOOO important to plant growth. If I don't use ProMix BX with Mycorrhizae, I add some mycorrhizae preparations to my plants from the get go. You can buy some powder that you store in the fridge and mix up with water, then douse your plants.

BTW, thank you for the picture! We want MORE
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Old 10-06-2014, 07:50 PM   #14
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I potted hundreds of baby plants today. I'd have to guess I have about 400 Lobelia siphilitica. They were way too small and tangled so I just ended up planting little clumps of seedlings together in 54 tray cells. I also potted 36 Lobelia cardinalis, 16-18 each of Viola lanceolata and Vernonia noveboracensis, and just 2-4 each of Allium cernuum, Liatris spciata, Aquilegia canadensis, Symphiotrichum nove-angliae and Solidago nemoralis.

Probably won't happen but what am I going to do with all these plants if they survive?! I certainly don't need all those L. siphilitica. This is why I've been toying with the idea of selling plants. I love propagating them, but after my beds are established, I won't have any use for them myself.

Now, with my summer seedlings set up for winter, I can start planning what I will winter sow! I'll have to start collecting milk jugs.

And Dap, as for the Aquilegia, they were sitting on top of the sand in a clear ziplock bag on a window sill. Shouldn't have had a problem. But then again, my Asclepias tuberosa and Rudbeckia hirta didn't germinate at all! Not sure what happened there.

I may re-work my method for next summer. I like the space-saving value of the ziplocks, but it's a REAL pain teasing the tiny little plants apart. I'd rather just put them in trays/containers with a better medium they can grow in for longer.
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Old 10-06-2014, 08:09 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disuhan View Post
Probably won't happen but what am I going to do with all these plants if they survive?! I certainly don't need all those L. siphilitica. This is why I've been toying with the idea of selling plants. I love propagating them, but after my beds are established, I won't have any use for them myself.
Share with ALL your friends and neighbors - heck, you can even share with your enemies if you have that many extra plants
You can start a native plant revolution

Or....you could bring some to Michigan and share with ME
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Old 10-06-2014, 08:21 PM   #16
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I like the space-saving value of the ziplocks, but it's a REAL pain teasing the tiny little plants apart. I'd rather just put them in trays/containers with a better medium they can grow in for longer.
That is exactly why I like to sow seeds in larger containers with more medium. I can leave them to grow longer and it is not such an emergency to get them potted up when they start running out of room.
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Old 10-06-2014, 08:37 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by disuhan View Post
I potted hundreds of baby plants today. I'd have to guess I have about 400 Lobelia siphilitica. They were way too small and tangled so I just ended up planting little clumps of seedlings together in 54 tray cells. I also potted 36 Lobelia cardinalis, 16-18 each of Viola lanceolata and Vernonia noveboracensis, and just 2-4 each of Allium cernuum, Liatris spciata, Aquilegia canadensis, Symphiotrichum nove-angliae and Solidago nemoralis...
Great job, disuhan!

...and nice selection, too.

I usually end up planting clumps too...some singles, some doubles or triples, but also clumps of quite a few more.

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And Dap, as for the Aquilegia, they were sitting on top of the sand in a clear ziplock bag on a window sill. Shouldn't have had a problem. But then again, my Asclepias tuberosa and Rudbeckia hirta didn't germinate at all! Not sure what happened there.
Well, I'm glad you sound like you got a fair amount of Aquilegia. I've had some luck with them, but have also had them fail on me.

I've also had sporadic success with A. tuberosa...I know I've had them germinate and succeeded in establishing some out in the field, but they don't seem to be as easy as the other wildflowers I've grown.

Quote:
Originally Posted by disuhan View Post
I may re-work my method for next summer. I like the space-saving value of the ziplocks, but it's a REAL pain teasing the tiny little plants apart. I'd rather just put them in trays/containers with a better medium they can grow in for longer.
Yes, I like the ProMiix method I've used where they have at least two inches or so to put down roots. I've teased out some and planted them early, but I've also left them in the pots from spring until November at times--not ideal, but they survived...stunted sometimes but none the worse once they get the room to grow.

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Share with ALL your friends and neighbors - heck, you can even share with your enemies if you have that many extra plants
You can start a native plant revolution
I like how you think, katjh.

You could also donate some to a native plant sale--or trade them for some species that you don't have yet.

I think someone mentioned in another thread that one could sell them at a flea market--it would be nice to get more people interested in native plants...more exposure--spread the word!
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Old 10-13-2014, 09:04 PM   #18
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I like how you think, katjh.

You could also donate some to a native plant sale--or trade them for some species that you don't have yet.

I think someone mentioned in another thread that one could sell them at a flea market--it would be nice to get more people interested in native plants...more exposure--spread the word!
Thanks, Dap! I might just be a bit of a rebel (in disguise, of course!).

I can only hope that my first winter sowing experience yields enough plants to share.
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Old 10-13-2014, 09:13 PM   #19
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Let us know how it goes kat.
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Old 10-14-2014, 05:16 PM   #20
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Thanks, Dap! I might just be a bit of a rebel (in disguise, of course!).
~smile~

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I can only hope that my first winter sowing experience yields enough plants to share.
I wish you lots of luck. I'm sure you will do fine.

Now that I've been really bitten by the propagating bug, I am wishing I started earlier. So, I'm glad you and Ellen are giving it a try.
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