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Old 05-12-2013, 09:23 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by rockerBOO View Post
Rhododendron (Propagating Rhododendrons)

Most dogwoods are good for cuttings.
Thanks, rockerBOO.

I've been meaning to try Rhododendrons...and I love dogwoods too.

I have at least a dozen dogwoods, and may just buy some bare root ones to fill in and become the "second generation" (really, once I start seeing them seed around themselves, I'll have a true second generation of dogwoods.
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Old 05-13-2013, 09:48 AM   #22
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Ohhhhhh..... I forgot about this thread.... really glad it popped up again. I looked up your RootBoost.... it's gonna be hard commenting on it because of this, " Rootboost is a proprietary blend of nutrients specifically designed to enhance the propagation of plant cuttings", GardenTech RootBoost Rooting Powder but.... since you've got it.... I'd play with it.
--
I'm looking back at your list of plants you'd like to try rooting and..... I feel like slapping myself up the side of the head. You'll end up with clones.... clones don't preserve genetic diversity and pretty much every plant you listed can be easily started from seed although.... you might need to use 1 liter pop bottles to provide for tap roots instead of smaller pots or the shallow trays we use for winter sowing. I mean.... I'm all for "playing".... believe me.... I am and I've played with cloining just for the sport of it mostly with cultivars but.... I guess I have to ask what your goal is since I'm assuming everything you listed out is a straight species.
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Old 05-21-2013, 10:08 PM   #23
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Here's something you might find interesting...

Willows have so much of the plant hormones that promote rooting that they can be used to help root other plants.
Pinch off the buds and ends of small, actively growing willow stems and crush them or chop them coarsely.
Put a couple cups of willow pieces in a gallon of warm water and let it steep in the sun as you would do with sun tea.
Then dip the ends of cuttings you want to grow in the solution before inserting the cutting in potting medium in a container.
Use the remaining mix to water the containers as they become dry.

http://www.life123.com/home-garden/t...r-garden.shtml
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Old 05-22-2013, 03:50 PM   #24
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Ohhhhhh..... I forgot about this thread.... really glad it popped up again. I looked up your RootBoost.... it's gonna be hard commenting on it because of this, " Rootboost is a proprietary blend of nutrients specifically designed to enhance the propagation of plant cuttings", GardenTech RootBoost Rooting Powder but.... since you've got it.... I'd play with it.
Thanks. I did play a little...but not as much as I'd planned on. However, many of the things I looked at needed to be rooted on new wood, so I put off most things--that and the fact that I have too many projects going on at the same time.

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I'm looking back at your list of plants you'd like to try rooting and..... I feel like slapping myself up the side of the head. You'll end up with clones.... clones don't preserve genetic diversity... I guess I have to ask what your goal is since I'm assuming everything you listed out is a straight species.
Yes, I realize they will be clones. I know that is not ideal, but the only thing I've rooted so far is the elderberry (at least I *think* they have rooted, I'm afraid to check and damage the roots). I collected two cuttings from each of the 9 or so shrubs I have on the property. So, even though they will be clones of what is already on the property, I didn't take them all from one individual.

I guess I just wanted to speed up the process, and double the amount of shrubs I have for an area that is currently an overgrown hedge of forsythia that I inherited from the previous owner.

Aside from that, I wanted to get some local linden and beech to add to the property, instead of buying something from farther away. Linden is supposed to be difficult to grow from seed, but other than that, the rest shouldn't be bad. By the way, I did end up buying one linden tree at a native plant sale in the middle of the state.
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Old 05-22-2013, 04:00 PM   #25
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Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
Willows have so much of the plant hormones that promote rooting that they can be used to help root other plants.
Pinch off the buds and ends of small, actively growing willow stems and crush them or chop them coarsely.
Put a couple cups of willow pieces in a gallon of warm water and let it steep in the sun as you would do with sun tea.
Then dip the ends of cuttings you want to grow in the solution before inserting the cutting in potting medium in a container.
Use the remaining mix to water the containers as they become dry.
I've heard of that, but never in so much detail.
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Old 05-22-2013, 07:30 PM   #26
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(at least I *think* they have rooted, I'm afraid to check and damage the roots).
I just rooted a bunch of things myself and was wondering about this very issue. If they're in a medium how can you see if and when they root, and when to transplant them?
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Old 05-23-2013, 08:10 AM   #27
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Try rooting things in place if you can.
You can keep them from drying out by covering them with a clotche'
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Old 07-26-2013, 12:58 AM   #28
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Probably the last thing most of us are thinking about in the middle of July is cloning our shrubs and trees.

But you may want to clone that crab-apple that doesn't suffer blights and the birds really love the berries on.

You want to find a place out of direct sunlight and good loose soil; Make your hardwood cutting about 6 inches long and take 3 inches of leaves off and stick it in the ground.

The trick is covering the cutting with a glass jar; This helps the cutting from drying out

After a month you can remove the jar to see if any new growth has started
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Old 07-26-2013, 01:04 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by disuhan View Post
I just rooted a bunch of things myself and was wondering about this very issue. If they're in a medium how can you see if and when they root, and when to transplant them?
-

When starting cuttings you want to leave them for a few months. Probably waiting till fall when they go dormant would be good,

Waiting till spring would be better
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Old 07-26-2013, 06:35 AM   #30
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the only thing I've rooted so far is the elderberry (at least I *think* they have rooted, I'm afraid to check and damage the roots).
How long have they been "rooting"? If it hasn't been 2 weeks, resist the temptation to check. If you have new growth, they're rooted. If not, can you use something to lift up just one to see if you have any trace of roots? You can gently place it back and water it, no matter what the results.
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cut, cuttings, dorman, dormant cuttings, dormant stem, elderberry, hardwood, hazlenut, hormone, progate, propagation, pussy willow, root, rooted, rootin, rooting hormone, roots, serviceberry, softwood

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