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Old 05-26-2014, 10:30 AM   #11
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I have not seen a suggestion to boil the stems. Just cut a slit in the stem as much as possible to let the water enter into the stem and leach out the hormones.

This should also work with Red-Osier Dogwood, which I am propagating to grow as deer/bird food.
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Old 05-26-2014, 04:29 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rockerBOO View Post
This should also work with Red-Osier Dogwood, which I am propagating to grow as deer/bird food.
I got some red-osier dogwood divisions from suckering around some friends' shrubs...so, I am happy that they are locally native. Anyway, are you saying that red-osier dogwoods make natural rooting hormones like willows? Or are you planning on rooting them with root hormones you've leached from the willow twigs?

If they root readily, I may decide to grow more of them...although, I must have about 7 plants so far (one mature enough to bloom ).
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Old 05-26-2014, 05:24 PM   #13
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I just cut the green stems off (3-5") the dogwood and put them in a mason jar. Shake the container once a day to add some oxygen. Will update on the progress though. Tried doing this live staking but it didn't seem to work, though I probably messed something up.

Live stakes for restoration plantings
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Old 05-27-2014, 12:36 AM   #14
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I love this whole idea. I don't actually need any more shrubs, but what the heck, I want to try this. I am going to clip my black willow tomorrow. Do they need to be woody twigs or are the greener ones okay?
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Old 05-27-2014, 06:43 AM   #15
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Use the green ones. Supposedly the new growth has more of the rooting hormone.
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Old 05-27-2014, 07:03 AM   #16
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I believe all of the stems will have the hormone (Salicylic acid) in it.

Might also induce rooting on herbaceous plants too.
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cuttings, hormone, how to, make willow water, plant cuttings, propagation, root, rooting, rooting hormone, roots, salicylic acid, water, weeping willow, weeping willows, willow, willow tree, willow twigs, willow water

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