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Old 12-21-2010, 05:48 PM   #11
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Fair enough.

I will delete my post. Like I said, first off I think saying what you believe is the most important thing. I always have deep respect for people who state their beliefs and explain them.

A lot of my family are religious, my cousin is a Jesuit. Another is a Priest. I love... well, the Jesuit guy. The other is a bit of a dork.

That's not the point though!

I realised reading H's post that I don;t actually understand her (?) position. I don't know what H means by certain words.

And I know very well the line "don't criticize what you can't understand".

I was curious about H's feelings about life.
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Old 12-21-2010, 06:01 PM   #12
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Havalotta and Philip - Thank you for your understanding. Political and religious discussions can be interesting and thought provoking, but we decided in the very beginning that we didn't want to expand WG's coverage of topics into those two areas. We want to stay as focused as we can on environmental issues.
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Old 12-21-2010, 07:40 PM   #13
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I get you.


No problem Cirsium.


I have a lot of respect for this forum. And for the posters in it.

I do not at all want to ruffle feathers. I am always scuffling about on the edge of things causing trouble.

You are quite right to enforce your vision for the forum.
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Old 12-22-2010, 08:58 AM   #14
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I would like to point out that many if not most evolutionary scientists are quite religious and do believe in God. There is not necessarily any incompatibility to being a religious scientist.

The problems start when you try to substitute one for the other. And that doesn't have anything to do with religion. It is simply a matter of ignorance.
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Old 12-22-2010, 01:09 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazelnut View Post
I would like to point out that many if not most evolutionary scientists are quite religious and do believe in God. There is not necessarily any incompatibility to being a religious scientist.

The problems start when you try to substitute one for the other. And that doesn't have anything to do with religion. It is simply a matter of ignorance.
That statement is at odds with what I've heard. Could you please provide credible backup?
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Old 12-22-2010, 01:58 PM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazelnut View Post
I would like to point out that many if not most evolutionary scientists are quite religious and do believe in God. There is not necessarily any incompatibility to being a religious scientist.

The problems start when you try to substitute one for the other. And that doesn't have anything to do with religion. It is simply a matter of ignorance.
I would say most might be pushing it.

But I did know and work with at least one evolutionary biologist that was very religious. She just received tenure in a good university too.

So it's clearly not all one or the other.
There seems to be room for God in people who are firm believers and understanders of evolutionary process.


I am fairly ignorant about religion. I became uncomfortable with what it represented in my home country, and I had little desire to learn much about it.

I found science more pleasing and I stuck with what I liked, like most humans I suppose. Pretty much the last... twenty something ???? lordy, I'm old, years of my life has been studying this sort of thing.

And nothing more than a baffled conversation or two about religion.

I was always too scared to ask the woman I worked with about how exactly God dovetailed in with everything else. My loss.
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Old 12-22-2010, 05:07 PM   #17
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I don't know if it has been noted here before, but the well-known phrase ""Nothing in biology makes sense except in the light of evolution" was coined by Theodosius Dobzhansky, who went on to say "I am a creationist and an evolutionist. Evolution is God's, or Nature's method of creation. Creation is not an event that happened in 4004 BC; it is a process that began some 10 billion years ago and is still under way." and "Does the evolutionary doctrine clash with religious faith? It does not. It is a blunder to mistake the Holy Scriptures for elementary textbooks of astronomy, geology, biology, and anthropology. Only if symbols are construed to mean what they are not intended to mean can there arise imaginary, insoluble conflicts." For more details, see Nothing in Biology Makes Sense Except in the Light of Evolution - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 12-22-2010, 05:19 PM   #18
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Dobzhansky was a big deal in the field. I didn't know he was also religious.

One of the canonical Population Genetics books that all of us had to read is written by Dobzhansky's student, Francisco Ayala.

Amazon.com: Population and Evolutionary Genetics: A Primer (Benjamin/Cummings Series in the Life Sciences) (9780805303155): Francisco Jose Ayala: Books

available for 1 cent used on amazon

It's not a trivial book to read but its good.


I know of another big guy who is religious. I think he is the chair of the NCBI or something. I can't remember off the top of my head.


Another book... now that I am on the subject, that when I read (when I was... maybe 20?) was Dennet's "Darwin's Dangerous Idea". Dennet is more of a philosopher, and there are few, if any, mathematical formula in the book. I suppose in this sense it could be on the edge of pop science. It was an amazing read none the less.
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