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Old 03-01-2010, 06:05 AM   #1
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Canadian Flag New Hypothesis on Human Migration to the Americas

http://www.vancouversun.com/technology/Scientists+turn+migration+theory+head/2615220/story.html



Scientists turn migration theory on its head


U.S. anthropologists hypothesize that ancestors of aboriginal people in South and North America followed High Arctic route



By Randy Boswell, Canwest News ServiceFebruary 26, 2010



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Two U.S. scientists have published a radical new theory about when, where and how humans migrated to the New World, arguing that the peopling of the Americas may have begun via Canada's High Arctic islands and the Northwest Passage -- much farther north and at least 10,000 years earlier than generally believed.

The hypothesis -- described as "speculative" but "plausible" by the researchers themselves -- appears in the latest issue of the journal Current Biology, which features a special series of new studies tracing humanity's proliferation out of Africa and around the world beginning about 70,000 years ago.
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Old 03-01-2010, 09:55 AM   #2
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Interesting but not new. There has always been a lot of speculation about some South American cultures being older than the Bering Straits hypothesis could explain.

Another plausible migration theory is from Polynesia via ocean currents.
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Old 03-01-2010, 03:12 PM   #3
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Right, I suppose these two particular scientist's publication is what is "new" about this. I got sucked into the newspaper's hype.

I don't know if it's still there, but the Smithsonian used to have a large display of Japanese Jomon period pottery (10,000-300 BC) side-by-side with material from the Valdivia culture of Ecuador, complete with a Japanese fishing boat. The similarities were striking, especially the pottery - I can't remember if the display came out and said "this is what happened", but the connections were compelling, even to casual observers.

I'd be surprised if there weren't a number of different migrations to the new world, accidental or otherwise.
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Old 03-01-2010, 03:46 PM   #4
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There are so many truly ancient sites in South America, that its hard to see how North America could have been settled first. If a few boats, or rafts, somehow survived the journey across the Pacific ocean, the material items from that event would be long gone. But there is another possibility. A fishing culture, using small boats, could have spread along the western coast of both North and South America. It might have thrived for 1000 years, before the population grew large enough to support migration to the east. If that is what happened, it will be hard to find evidence, since the material remains are buried under mud, and covered with seawater.
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Old 03-01-2010, 10:37 PM   #5
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Thor Heyerdahl's Kon Tiki expedition explored the Polynesian hypothesis.

Thor Heyerdahl - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
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Old 03-02-2010, 05:14 PM   #6
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dragonfly01 We IndigenUs

have been here waaaay longer than any human's lifespan; indeed, longer than any culture's lifespan, so it's all moot.
We IndigenUs see the whole discussion as just another ongoing effort to prove we don't have original claim to this land, so they can 'justify' / 'rationalize' genocide & all the crap that has been done to us in the past 518 years & continues insofar as mascotting & assimilation efforts are concerned.
Ugly, you say? So quit doing it, already. It's really very simple.. There is no justification for the efforts at assimilation & mascotting, then or now. Or ever. The facts are:
We were here first. We were here for thousands & thousands &.... of years before Europoids knew 'here' was here. And our Prophecies teach that we'll be here long after the majority culture has gone the way of the passenger pigeon. We're planning on it..
And as "important new discoveries" in a wide variety of fields prove, our Prophecies are continuing to be right. Facts are facts; they stand on their own; anyone's dislike of them doesn't alter them 1 iota.
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Old 03-04-2010, 09:22 AM   #7
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Default Primitive Humans Conquered Sea, Surprising Finds Suggest

Primitive Humans Conquered Sea, Surprising Finds Suggest
Heather Pringle
for National Geographic magazine
Published February 17, 2010

Primitive Humans Conquered Sea, Surprising Finds Suggest
excerpt from above:
Quote:
Two years ago a team of U.S. and Greek archaeologists were combing a gorge on the island of Crete (map) in Greece, hoping to find tiny stone tools employed by seafaring people who had plied nearby waters some 11,000 years ago.

Instead, in the midst of the search, Providence College archaeologist Thomas Strasser and his team came across a whopping surprise—a ...
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Old 03-04-2010, 10:21 AM   #8
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I don't know how believable this one is. There are just so many ways you can make a hand-axe and one made on quartz is going to look a lot more primitive than one made of chert. You need a whole lot of data to prove one hypothesis.
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Old 03-04-2010, 11:41 AM   #9
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pahinh: It would be highly unethical to use any type archeological data to justify the denial of of human rights.

There is a nice summary discussion of paleoindian migration at Wikipedia:

Paleo-Indians - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Quote:
Archaeologists contend that Paleo-Indians migration out of Beringia (eastern Alaska), ranges from 40,000 to around 16,500 years ago.[3][12][13][14] This time range is a hot source of debate and will be for years to come. The few agreements achieved to date are the origin from Central Asia, with widespread habitation of the Americas during the end of the last glacial period, or more specifically what is known as the late glacial maximum, around 16,000 — 13,000 years before present.[14][15] However, older alternative theories exist, including migration from Europe.[16]
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