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Old 08-01-2010, 09:13 PM   #1
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Flowerpink Eighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center

Two weeks ago I went on a fruitless quest for wild Canada lilies in bloom. I searched some areas where they had been documented 70+ years ago. I am beginning to fear that they have been extirpated from much of the region, for I have never seen one. However, on my excursion I did see some other interesting things.

Eighteenmile Creek was one of the locations where Gentianopsis crinita once grew, so I plan to go back in September and investigate. This time around, I found a few things of great interest, although much of the park was thoroughly invaded by Japanese knotweed. I also saw lots of the alien Lysimachia vulgaris, which I had only seen once before. It was clearly invasive in this location - watch out for this one in the future, folks. Could end up being a real nasty.

Natives:
Eighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-aparinoides.jpg
Campanula aparinoides

Eighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-prenanthes.jpg
Prenanthes alba

Eighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-wildphloxes.jpg
Eighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-phlox2.jpg
Edit: Saponaria officinalis (alien), NOT Phlox maculata

Eighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-fringed.jpg
Lysimachia ciliata
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Old 08-01-2010, 09:17 PM   #2
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This is a Desmodium (tick-trefoil), but I can't decide between Desmodium paniculatum and Desmodium canadense, so I'll let the experts decide:
Eighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-desmodium.jpgEighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-desmodium2.jpgEighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-desmodium-closeup.jpg

Cut-leaf coneflower, supposedly non-native here but good to see nonetheless:
Eighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-rudbeckialaciniata.jpg
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Old 08-01-2010, 09:20 PM   #3
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Some pics from the Burchfield Center, where the Lysimachia ciliata was truly robust and abundant:

Eighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-wild-lysimachia.jpgEighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-yellowdots.jpg

See all the yellow dots in the second picture?

Zizia aurea:
Eighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-zizia-wasps.jpg

The scale is hard to tell, but this was a truly gigantic Impatiens pallida specimen:
Eighteenmile Creek County Park; Charles Burchfield Nature & Art Center-big-impatiens.jpg
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Old 08-01-2010, 10:21 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amelanchier View Post
Two weeks ago I went on a fruitless quest for wild Canada lilies in bloom. I searched some areas where they had been documented 70+ years ago. I am beginning to fear that they have been extirpated from much of the region, for I have never seen one. However, on my excursion I did see some other interesting things.

Eighteenmile Creek was one of the locations where Gentianopsis crinita once grew, so I plan to go back in September and investigate. This time around, I found a few things of great interest, although much of the park was thoroughly invaded by Japanese knotweed. I also saw lots of the alien Lysimachia vulgaris, which I had only seen once before. It was clearly invasive in this location - watch out for this one in the future, folks. Could end up being a real nasty.

Natives:
Attachment 18677
Campanula aparinoides

Attachment 18676
Prenanthes alba

Attachment 18678
Attachment 18679
Phlox maculata, endangered in NY

Attachment 18680
Lysimachia ciliata
I *love* the Campanula aparinoides with the rock outcropping. I have this thing about rocks and plants growing in rugged locations. My father used to grow Campanulas in his rockgarden. That one was my least favorite as a kid, but now that I'm into natives, I'd love to grow this one on my property--in a similar setting!

I'm battling a small area of Japanese knotweed on my property, but can see huge sections of it in the distance along the stream...and along sections of the stream when I'm driving. =(
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Old 08-01-2010, 10:27 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amelanchier View Post
Attachment 18678
Attachment 18679
Phlox maculata, endangered in NY
What you have labelled as Phlox maculata reminds me of Saponaria--soapwort...but, I could easily be wrong.
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Old 08-02-2010, 08:38 AM   #6
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
What you have labelled as Phlox maculata reminds me of Saponaria--soapwort...but, I could easily be wrong.
No, you're right! I had keyed it out and everything, but after looking online, the center of the flower gives it away.
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Old 08-02-2010, 12:38 PM   #7
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No, you're right! I had keyed it out and everything, but after looking online, the center of the flower gives it away.
I was just going by looks, I didn't key it out. My first year here, I spotted some and had hoped it was a native phlox--or other native, but found out it was not.

I guess this should go on the gardening mistakes thread, but this reminds me of something that happened about 10 years ago. We had stopped at a regular nursery and I spotted what I thought was phlox growing in old, discarded pots of dead plants. I asked about buying them because it was a wildflower. The man there said it was a weed and gave them to me.

Naive me, thought that he just didn't know anything about wildflowers. After lugging them home, I keyed it out and found out that it was Dame's rocket! How stupid, I felt. So, I really don't trust myself when it comes to phlox!
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Old 08-02-2010, 12:47 PM   #8
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Well, now I've got a garden mistake to match yours! This plant is the same species I was given in a trade on another gardening website a couple of years ago. I was told it was Phlox. Now I have to go rip it out. Oh well, at least now I have no reason to be disappointed that it wasn't reseeding itself!
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Old 08-02-2010, 01:02 PM   #9
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Well, now I've got a garden mistake to match yours! This plant is the same species I was given in a trade on another gardening website a couple of years ago. I was told it was Phlox. Now I have to go rip it out. Oh well, at least now I have no reason to be disappointed that it wasn't reseeding itself!
Aww.

~sigh~

Maybe double check before you pull it out.

I just bought my first meadow phlox this spring and will see how it does here. I'm most familiar with Phlox divaricata, but hope to find several phlox species appropriate for a meadow.
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art, burchfield, campanula aparinoides, center, charles, county, creek, eighteenmile, lysimachia ciliata, native plant, natives, nature, park, phlox, phlox maculata, plants, prenanthes alba, wildflower, wildflowers

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