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Old 07-05-2010, 08:06 PM   #21
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I agree, what a great place. I've never seen that lily either.

It's hard to see but the plant in post #6 looks like Juniperus communis, not Taxus canadensis.
OK, I think you're right. The fruit gives it away. There seemed to be two different evergreen species there; maybe the blurry one in the foreground is something else.
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Old 07-14-2010, 10:32 PM   #22
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OK, I think you're right. The fruit gives it away. There seemed to be two different evergreen species there; maybe the blurry one in the foreground is something else.
Happened to take a look at the official species list for Bergen Swamp today. Apparently what I photographed is neither Taxus canadensis nor Juniperus communis, but something called Juniperus horizontalis, creeping juniper, which I'd never heard of before. It's a mostly boreal species that's state-listed. Cool!
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Old 07-14-2010, 11:39 PM   #23
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I've seen that way up north, I wouldn't have guessed it occurred in NY. There are some very popular garden cultivars.

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official species list
Haha - I spent a lot of time one summer trying to ID plants on a friend's land with a conservation easement, and one day his wife asks me if I'd seen "the plant list" for the property, produced by the state natural resources department -- uhh, nooo..
It was a real eye-opener, I'm sure I never would have figured out some of them.
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Old 07-15-2010, 10:08 AM   #24
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Haha - I spent a lot of time one summer trying to ID plants on a friend's land with a conservation easement, and one day his wife asks me if I'd seen "the plant list" for the property, produced by the state natural resources department -- uhh, nooo..
It was a real eye-opener, I'm sure I never would have figured out some of them.
Heh, heh... Yeah, those lists are especially useful for non-showy things that one doesn't encounter in gardening circles ("Uh, something in Urticaceae?").
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Old 07-15-2010, 03:54 PM   #25
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I'm late to the party, but thanks for a great tour!!
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Old 08-04-2011, 06:31 PM   #26
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I went back to Bergen Swamp last weekend, this time with a bunch of botanists who know their stuff (much better than I). I spent more time looking around than taking pictures, but I got a few.

BTW, the "sandy" area that I came across last time is called a "marl room." Marl is the type of soil. It's basically calcium carbonate that's been precipitated out of the swamp water. So the plants that grow here tend to like lime. However, interestingly, on hummocks sphagnum moss and acid-loving plants grow, like blueberries and black huckleberries.

Argh... Got to make dinner. Will upload pictures later this evening...
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Old 08-04-2011, 07:05 PM   #27
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Bergen Swamp-sticky-tolfeldia.jpg Bergen Swamp-triantha-glutinosa.jpg
Sticky tolfeldia, Triantha glutinosa - endangered in NY

Bergen Swamp-zigadenus.jpg Bergen Swamp-zigadenus-elegans.jpg
Deathcamas, Zigadenus elegans - threatened in NY
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Old 08-04-2011, 07:13 PM   #28
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Bergen Swamp-pitcher-plants.jpg
Pitcher plants

Bergen Swamp-black-huckleberry.jpg
Black huckleberry

Bergen Swamp-spiranthes-lacera.jpg
Ladies' tresses, Spiranthes lacera

Bergen Swamp-solidago-houghtonii.jpg
And the climax of them all... The federally threatened, state endangered Houghton's goldenrod, Oligoneuron houghtonii
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Old 08-04-2011, 07:42 PM   #29
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Originally Posted by amelanchier View Post
Attachment 25405
Pitcher plants

Attachment 25404
Black huckleberry

Attachment 25403
Ladies' tresses, Spiranthes lacera

Attachment 25402
And the climax of them all... The federally threatened, state endangered Houghton's goldenrod, Oligoneuron houghtonii
Great tour! Is it legal to collect seed from some of those plants???
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Old 08-04-2011, 08:00 PM   #30
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Quote:
Originally Posted by amelanchier View Post

BTW, the "sandy" area that I came across last time is called a "marl room." Marl is the type of soil. It's basically calcium carbonate that's been precipitated out of the swamp water. So the plants that grow here tend to like lime. However, interestingly, on hummocks sphagnum moss and acid-loving plants grow, like blueberries and black huckleberries.
Cool. I think I've read or noticed that lowbush blueberries do seem to grow on soil above limestone. I always like the look of stuff like that.

I *might* have some sphagnum moss (or some other cool looking moss) in one corner of our yard...I'd like to add blueberries there.
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