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Old 01-23-2009, 10:14 PM   #21
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Sometimes the only habitat left for plants is power line rights of way and roadsides.
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:22 PM   #22
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I would ask permission, trout lilly, which they will surely give.

I remember lorax going through all sorts of beaurocratic heck trying to procure some local genotype penstemon digitalis that was growing on a roadside for a friend who is forever grateful, LOL!

I'm not saying that your case will be difficult. I have seen all sorts of natives growing by the roadside on Rt. 12. (monardas, silphiums, penstmon, fireweed) I just call up IDOT, and they happily let me collect seeds.

In IL, it is illegal to collect seeds/plants in local forest preserve districts and state parks. It was not illegal to collect seeds/plants in National parks. However, due to over-collection by colleges and universities, it is now illegal to collect over a certain amount of seed/plant material from national parks. Your car will be checked on the way out, LOL!
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:27 PM   #23
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Some of the best habitat I've ever seen for local genotype native prairie plants is old graveyards. Some of them are of such high quality it's breath-taking. they get mowed once a year, which is favourable...and oh my gosh. they are spectacular in the spring and summer.
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:43 PM   #24
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Wow, productive discussions like this just make me want to get up and dance a happy jig! Thanks everyone!

I do have to admit there is a little collector in me. A friend of mine who has a similar piece of wet wooded property mentioned that she had lots of club moss, so I asked her nicely if I could have a sample. I feel like a brooding chicken waiting for the snow-cover to hatch so I can verify that my two sprigs made it through the winter.

That’s what got me thinking about this field collection business – and also, this Christmas I put together packs of native flower seeds to give as gifts. Most of those seeds were collected from plants in my own yard. However, since my milkweeds were eaten by monarchs, I took seeds from a couple of plants growing down the street, growing in the margins of a pizza shop. Seeing as the yard around the shop is, by any neighborhood standards, a weedy mess, I didn’t bother getting permission, so I’m guilty on two counts there – both of collecting from the wild *and* stealing!

I can’t be getting good karma all the time; that would just be all unbalanced.

So, I’m not quite up to your standards, Lorax, but nonetheless I do admire your standards!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilibrium View Post
Sometimes the only habitat left for plants is power line rights of way and roadsides.


I grew up under a power-line easement, and I do have to say, they are some of the nation’s most undervalued ecological resources!

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Originally Posted by TheLorax View Post
We then grow the socks. Yup, each child grows out their socks . . .


Oh my goodness, that’s brilliant! I hope you will start a post on that over in the education section, pretty please?

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Originally Posted by Prairiefreak View Post
Some of the best habitat I've ever seen for local genotype native prairie plants is old graveyards. Some of them are of such high quality it's breath-taking. they get mowed once a year, which is favourable...and oh my gosh. they are spectacular in the spring and summer.


Oooh, one of these days I’ll have to find some old graveyards to visit!
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Old 01-23-2009, 10:58 PM   #25
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There's a little collector in all of us. I don't have any standards for you, they're all mine The socks you're going to have to remember to do when your little one is older. They get the biggest kick out of their socks growing.
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Old 01-24-2009, 09:17 AM   #26
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Older graveyards definitely can contain remnants. Good observation.
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Old 01-25-2009, 12:20 PM   #27
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A trip to the Board of Selectmen's meeting to ask permission to dig up 5 roadside native plants is on my agenda. A few years back, when I was a tad more naive and new to town, I asked the board if they would remove the 3 huge burning bush (a shrub that had become prohibited in NH) from the Town Hall landscaping. They explained that the local flower club had planted the shrubs and they would remain until they died. Who was going to die wasn't clear

Still, going before them again, now that I'm not a newcomer in town, will give me a chance to talk about the advantages of native plants.
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Old 01-25-2009, 12:33 PM   #28
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Default Euonymus alata (Burning Bush)

Although your post has little to do with field collecting/wild harvesting and was deserving of a thread of its own in Invasive Flora http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...splay.php?f=64, your tenacity is admirable. After all, what message is the Board of Selectmen sending to the residents of the community by prominently displaying a prohibited species? Do as we say not as we do?

If you would like to start a thread on burning bushes in the Invasive Flora forum, I would be happy to move your post into your new thread so your fellow forum members have a better chance learning from you.
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Old 01-25-2009, 01:42 PM   #29
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Euonymous alata, and all of its cultivars, are prohibited in NH. It's ridiculous to allow those bushes to stand when there are so many more responsible choices. Who on the Board of Selectmen is sleeping with someone from the local flower club? What other poor decisions does this Board of Selectmen make because they allow emotion to over rule logic?
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Old 01-25-2009, 02:05 PM   #30
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Old cemeteries (c. 1830) here were turned over to the care of State prisoners and the heirloom plants were systematically destroyed. These spaces too need to be protected.
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