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Old 05-23-2019, 09:59 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by havalotta View Post
Your hepaticas appear different than ours. I don't recall ours having leaves up tight to the blossoms like yours have.
We are finally awakening. I see the bright yellows of the cowslips peeking out in the ditches
I don't think I've seen that before either. Interesting.
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Old 05-23-2019, 10:00 PM   #12
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Wow - ephemerals are pretty much done here. I already started gathering seeds of spring beauty. They're pretty easy to cultivate if you have a lot of patience. My technique is to plant the seeds in those clear plastic salad boxes with holes poked in the bottom for drainage. The lid keeps them moist all spring and winter, then they germinate easily the following spring. This technique works for bluebells, too.
Oh boy! I'm going to try this for sure. Thanks for the tip!
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Old 05-24-2019, 07:44 PM   #13
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Wow - ephemerals are pretty much done here. I already started gathering seeds of spring beauty. They're pretty easy to cultivate if you have a lot of patience. My technique is to plant the seeds in those clear plastic salad boxes with holes poked in the bottom for drainage. The lid keeps them moist all spring and winter, then they germinate easily the following spring. This technique works for bluebells, too.
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Oh boy! I'm going to try this for sure.
Thanks for the tip!
Me, too!

I have grown many other natives from seed...and have been ignoring the spring ephemerals. I hope to change that this year. I have both spring beauties and Virginia bluebells (among others).

Yes, thanks for the tip.
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Old 05-25-2019, 08:40 AM   #14
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Love them all but spring beauty is one of my favorites! I finally got these established in my shade garden. Hubby thought I'd finally gone crazy when I got super excited to see them bloom this spring.

I would go pretty crazy too! Seems as if most of these spring bloomers have pretty difficult culture, but Helianthus says otherwise... interesting.
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Old 06-07-2019, 11:21 AM   #15
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The hardest part for propagating spring beauty is finding the seeds before the plants disappear. Bluebell seeds are a little easier, but both require good timing and vigilance.
One year I stored Claytonia seeds in a ziplock bag filled with damp sand all summer then put them in my fridge around October. By December, they had germinated IN MY FRIDGE! I spent the rest of the winter having to bring the seedlings inside when temps went below freezing. Since then, I keep all my seeds outside all year in the salad containers.
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Old 06-10-2019, 07:55 AM   #16
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The hardest part for propagating spring beauty is finding the seeds before the plants disappear. Bluebell seeds are a little easier, but both require good timing and vigilance.
One year I stored Claytonia seeds in a ziplock bag filled with damp sand all summer then put them in my fridge around October. By December, they had germinated IN MY FRIDGE! I spent the rest of the winter having to bring the seedlings inside when temps went below freezing. Since then, I keep all my seeds outside all year in the salad containers.
Great advice...and wonderful anecdote.

I think I may be able to collect some of the bluebell seeds...but, I'm not as confident about the spring beauty.
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