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-   -   Beulah Bog State Natural Area (http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/forum/natural-areas/126-beulah-bog-state-natural-area.html)

TheLorax 11-26-2008 09:55 PM

Beulah Bog State Natural Area
 
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I was invited to go with a natural areas management group to visit Beulah Bog State Natural Area in Walworth Co. WI a few weekends ago.

http://www.dnr.state.wi.us/org/land/er/sna/sna122.htm

Fortunately, it was cold and raining so we had no competition for the trails.

This photo is of the board walk through the bog. It was literally a board walk and was very slippery. One of us slipped off and went in the drink chest level. Bad day for that as it air temps were only in the upper 30's.

This photo is of a few members of the group examining Larix laricina (Tamarack) along the boardwalk.

TheLorax 11-26-2008 10:03 PM

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There were some pretty amazing specimens of Sarracenia purpurea ssp. purpurea in the area.

TheLorax 11-26-2008 10:10 PM

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On the walk in, I think I saw some Desmodium cuspidatum as well as some Anemone cylindrica.

I could have sworn this was the photo I took of Drosera intermedia (Sundew) hibernacula. I'm pretty sure it's there... somewhere. You find it if you can. Too darn small for me.

TheLorax 11-26-2008 10:22 PM

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More Sarracenia. Might as well experiment to see if I can load more than one photo into the same post.

TheLorax 11-26-2008 10:27 PM

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I'll be a son of a gun. It worked. Three in the same post. That's great. Thank you to who ever allowed us to do that!

There were literally thousands of Sarracenia purps at this bog.

TheLorax 11-26-2008 10:39 PM

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Not the greatest photo but I believe this is Eriophorum vaginatum(Cotton Grass) which is a wetlands species indicator and a high quality one too.

TheLorax 11-26-2008 10:49 PM

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This first photo is of Lake Beulah. If we had visited a month or so earlier we would have been able to see Utricularia spp. (Bladderwort).

The second photo is on our way out. There were two species of cranberry present which was really neat. Vaccinum macrocarpon and V. oxycoccos. Both are either threatened or endangered.

TheLorax 11-26-2008 10:52 PM

I found this site that had some nice comments about Beulah-

http://www.geocaching.com/seek/cache...d-53f8333a7e6a
Quote:

Here is what Trails.com writes:
A boardwalk to the center of a primeval bog. Name the least-disturbed natural habitat in this corner of the state and it would have to be bogs. Beulah Bog is a good example of these Ice Age relics; its impressive list of credits includes several rare plants and six carnivorous ones. This wetland also features floating mud flats, a bog lake, and a tamarack forest. Best of all, it has a way to get to the middle, a boardwalk. Bogs are neat, intriguing places, but they are inaccessible, too wet to walk and too thick with vegetation to canoe.
Quote:

(Updated 7/10/07)Recently, I had the pleasure of speaking with Renae Prell-Mitchell who wrote a dissertation about the bog and surrounding land. Apparently, this bog is very unusual. It is the most southern bog of this type; having the characteristics of bogs found much further north in the US. She described it as donut in the depression of the land. There is a “moat” area around the bog, then a hard packed sphagnum “donut” and then the bog. The bog itself is actually floating on top of a lake. And much like ice, if you would walk out on it, you could fall through and get caught underneath it. The solid sphagnum area is a build up of dead moss much the same way a coral reef grows. Because tamarack trees growing there and the composition of the sphagnum it is extremely sterile and early pioneers used it for everything from bandages to diapers. Also you should find the bogs hosts a number of amphibians including frogs, turtles and snakes. Other flora that you can find in the area is sundew and wild cranberries. Renae did warn that there is poison sumac all around, so be careful. (End of Update)

Prairiefreak 11-30-2008 06:10 PM

That was a fun trip, wasn't it? I wish the boardwalk hadn't been so "tippy"...I'd have been in the drink fo shizzle!

TheLorax 11-30-2008 06:59 PM

Yes, thoroughly enjoyed myself. And most wooden board walks are slippery when wet which is the pits. Felt really bad for the person who slipped off the boardwalk. Very long walk back to the vehicles and it was cold that day.


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