Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Natural Gardeners Unite > Mulch

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 04-30-2013, 09:50 AM   #11
WG Fundraising Coordinator
 
linrose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Kentucky
Default

We tend to get mulch in bulk because of the area we have to cover which is half the price of buying in bags. Down here we have a place called Simply Mulch that handles mulch, compost, stone, gravels, etc. Pine fines go for $42 a cubic yard, hardwood for $21 and cedar for $35. A cubic yard fits nicely in a pickup truck bed. Compare that to $3.25 for a 2 cu. ft. bag of pine bark at Lowes. Cypress is slightly cheaper at $3 a 2 cu. ft. bag.

I still use our chopped composted leaves for the perennial beds and save the pine fines for the shrub and tree beds. I'm using a lot more this year because of the upcoming garden party and I wanted to spiff up the place a bit more than we usually do. We used to buy bulk compost from Western Kentucky University here in town until we started making our own. They make a great product from composted leaves collected in town mixed with manure from the Ag Station and composted down a year. I wanted to wean myself off them because I found so much trash in the compost and didn't know about herbicides/pesticides people used on their trees/lawns even though they probably dissipated after a year's worth of composting. Still if you have access to a local university with an Ag department it's worth checking into.
linrose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 10:07 AM   #12
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

There's only one bed in which I use mulch in. That would be the most Southern, Aster bed located in FULL SUN against the home.
We've a few cedar trees nearby that shed naturally.... Twice yearly I rake forth (with my hands) the dead orange debris and toss it over the bed to hopefully retain a bit of moisture and ward off some of the heat.
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2013, 07:26 AM   #13
Heron
 
liquidambar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: South central Kentucky
Default

Okay, here is a question I am afraid to ask, but it needs to be asked cause I need to know?
Linrose; Did you look those cubic feet up and prices?
Or

Did you remember all that from the last time you bought them?

I bought a bunch just last Fall and I could not remember.
I have not been to worried about Not remembering but maybe I should?
liquidambar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2013, 07:36 AM   #14
WG Fundraising Coordinator
 
linrose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Kentucky
Default

I checked the Lowes website for the prices and sizes on their mulch. I could never remember that!!! My mind is pretty much like a sieve these days. Ah well, the price of aging! I don't buy from them anymore. We have a local nursery a half mile from us that sells bagged pine bark mulch that is really nice. It costs a little more but I don't have to drive 10 miles into town and the product is much better. I only use the bagged stuff for topdressing since it's pretty pricey at $4.50 a bag.
linrose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2013, 11:51 AM   #15
Heron
 
liquidambar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: South central Kentucky
Default

Ohhh, what a relief!
I am okay then. Whew!
liquidambar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-01-2013, 11:54 AM   #16
WG Fundraising Coordinator
 
linrose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Kentucky
Default

hey, why try to remember stuff when you can just look it up on the internet!
linrose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2013, 01:07 PM   #17
Fox
 
wildwatcher's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Northcentral rural Arkansas, usa
pawprint mulch & practice

And to help remember stuff...I take pixs! (albeit not very good photos) Mulch - what do you use?-mulch-garden.jpg.jpgHopefully the mulch will help these seedlings get going & stay viable for the upcoming summer.

By the way, I was careful in this garden not to disturb the dirt beneath the mulch, leaving it rather packed or slightly raked no deeper than 1/2". By not disrupting the dirt structure below the mulch I'm expecting better results this year.

I'm still watering daily for seed germination then much less added water...perhaps.

Mulch - what do you use?-mulch-work-area.jpg.jpgExtra mulch for later, as the plants grow larger I will add more mulch.

ww
wildwatcher is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2013, 03:04 PM   #18
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

Last year I bought bark mulch in a bag and never got around to using it. It was the finer stuff - not the big chunks. I used it this weekend. It was beautiful. A pain to work with because the bags had disintegrated, but it was much closer to compost.
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-12-2013, 02:22 PM   #19
Heron
 
liquidambar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: South central Kentucky
Default

Hubby brought me some very good black dirt up from where they feed the cattle in the winter and dumped in my garden. I am going to use it the front of our house -

There is a high side walk - and then I put in a stone wall and now I need to fill it up with dirt.


How LONGGGGG DO I have to keep the black plastic covering it to kill the weeds??????????????
liquidambar is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-14-2013, 05:10 PM   #20
Curious George & UAOKA recipient
 
turttle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Chapel Hill, NC
Default

Learn to think of weeds as volunteers...wildflowers...become one with your weeds...learn to love as many of them as you can and the workload decreases dramatically. If it is native, it can stay (except for poison ivy in areas where I walk!) is my rule of thumb. It cuts down on an amazing amount of work!

The curators at the botanical garden and local arboreturm firmly believe that putting back the leaves, shredded if in areas where aeshetics are important, is the best mulch. I leave my leaves as they fall wherever I can, blow them and shred them where necessary then spread them. I had the tops of two dead trees cut down last year, and the wood shredded into mulch. It sat through the winter and I just spread it this spring with plant-tone under it since it is in no way fully composted yet.

Chapel Hill has banned the use of pine straw as mulch around any schools and other public buildings because of the fire risk. The stuff is apparently way more flammable than other mulches. Just fyi.
__________________
There is pleasure in the pathless woods, there is rapture in the lonely shore, this is society where none intrudes, by the deep sea, and music in its roar. - Lord Byron

Turttle's pollinator garden
turttle is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
cypress, green, greens, hay, lawn clippings, leaves, manure, mulch, mulch types, mulching, newspaper, pine, pine straw, rocks, straw

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:16 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2