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Old 07-29-2012, 01:52 AM   #11
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Ya, the floating was pretty funny. She's out and about and not trying to nest anymore. She hasn't started laying any eggs though and it's been over a week. How long did it take yours to start laying eggs again after you helped her snap out of being broody?
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Old 07-31-2012, 04:10 PM   #12
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I want to cry, she and the other buff is broody something awful still. I'm going to eat the, soon!
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Old 08-13-2012, 07:34 PM   #13
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My Oprah finally popped out of being broody and laid an egg this weekend. We put her in the "personality enhancer" any time she starts trying to sit. You've really gotta be on top of them though. My bet is she's gonna go broody again so I'm gonna have to dip her and stick her back in the chicken tractor during the day.
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I think if we weren't attached to her.... I wouldn't bother and she'd end up getting sent to freezer camp. I will get a photo of her floating the next time we've got to cool her down. It was a definite gut buster seeing her there floating in the cooler.
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Old 09-03-2012, 10:25 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilibrium View Post
My Oprah finally popped out of being broody and laid an egg this weekend. We put her in the "personality enhancer" any time she starts trying to sit. You've really gotta be on top of them though. My bet is she's gonna go broody again so I'm gonna have to dip her and stick her back in the chicken tractor during the day.
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I think if we weren't attached to her.... I wouldn't bother and she'd end up getting sent to freezer camp. I will get a photo of her floating the next time we've got to cool her down. It was a definite gut buster seeing her there floating in the cooler.
I would keep her, she will be the broody you will need to keep a closed flock and hatch out your eggs. nothing beats a mama hen taking care of the babies for you. mine is sitting on 12 eggs now, 20 days more and we got chicks again. I wanted to replace the 3 I gave away, 1 rooster and 2 lorps that were a pain in my side. I plan to take the pick of the litter so to speak and let the others go to a friend. Im thrilled, I will not have to wait all summer for them to lay, I will get eggs from these girls in the winter between February and March.
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Old 12-29-2012, 02:41 PM   #15
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I think I need to take more precautions with my chickens about catching diseases. I know my grandfather kept a pan of Lysol out in front of his chicken houses and no one was allowed to go into the houses or from house to house unless they soaked their shoes in those pans.

We raise silkies and they are very broody. You know you got problems with a broody hen, when she hatches them all out and still just wants to sit. I have one that sat a week after she hatched them out. We finally put her in a special cage so it kept her from getting down, the baby chicks following, then her returning to the nest, leaving them to fend for themselves --because they could not get back up in the coop and then us finding them out in the raspberries at midnight all cold. Even with them peeping or chirping loudly and her answering them it still could not get her out of being broody. These chickens are all bred up until they are confused . .
We also have polish and those have never gone broody. If we did not have the broody silkies we would have no polish.

So I guess we have the best of both worlds.

Speaking of hatching out killdeers - has anyone hatched out quail?

We hatched out two batches last summer - 40 eggs in each batch, from an incubator. Everyone of them hatched!!! No problems like having to help them out of the egg like the chickens or the geese.

I opened up the incubator to get them out and they swarmed out like little roaches - only cuter of course. I thought I had them all in the box, but 20 minutes later I checked on them to find out that I had missed a few and they had returned and was hanging around the box all lonesome.

We finally let them go when they were about three weeks old. They were so enjoyable -- one bunch would come around and look inside the door of our house and then leave and then the other bunch would come around. We also had different areas of the yard that had food and water they would come to, during different parts of the day. They started coming around less and less, but every once in a while I would be surprised as I look up from my gardening at the sound of a almost happy purr of a little swarms - as they greeted me. I couldn't keep from counting them . Most times for both flocks I would get 40.

The neighbors also got to enjoy them. One neighbor said he was peeling apples and looked up to find himself surrounded by quail eating on his peels. The whole community started reporting back to us where they were. Mostly they settled in an alfalfa field just half a mile up the road.
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Old 12-29-2012, 11:33 PM   #16
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I didn't hatch out the kildeers.... I passed em on to a rehabber like a hot potato as soon as I could. My bad!
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No quail for me. I can honestly say if I ran into any quail eggs I'd give it my best shot if but for nothing else other than to experience them "swarming" out like little roaches. That cracked me up reading that!!! I'd have to relocate my swarming roaches though. They wouldn't last long here what with the hawks... the owls.... the coyotes.... dumped cats and a few stray dogs traipsing through.
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I think it's kinda cool you're getting quail "sightings" from all over the community.
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Old 12-30-2012, 12:48 AM   #17
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I understand why you would pass them off quick - it is fun but a great deal of work. You are not bad!

Heee,heee, heee besides you are too busy teaching chickens to swim!!!

I had no idea they could swim and I have been around them all my life, nope not a clue.

I was offered this past summer a nest of wild turkey eggs - the farmer had ran over the nest with a bush hog. Had not harmed the eggs but ran off the mother.
I refused them too - but I gave him my incubator. He ran over 'em he can now take care of 'em.

He did and I think had a good time doing it.
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Old 12-30-2012, 03:45 PM   #18
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About diseases, we only use shoes specifically used in the coop and pen. No one now goes near my birds. I do not want them sick, nor diseased. I raise only chickens that produce eggs well, and since I do not have a rooster ( I live in the city) I get my eggs from a gal in the country I wipe off and get only the birds I want. I'm going to be doing chics for my son this year, he lives with my mom and really wants to have some. Looking into a coop for him now.
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Old 12-31-2012, 11:48 AM   #19
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Hi Doozerdoo:
My grandfather wouldn't let anyone near his chicken houses either.
He would get on the gray hound bus before he got a car and go to the University to learn all he could. He became sort of an expert in chickens.
I moved back to my home town a few years ago, and ran into a man that said he took a dead chicken one time to my grandfather to ask him what he thought was wrong, and grandfather ran him off the place. He thought it funny and that my grandfather was strange. Hump, he didn't have enough sense to be ashamed!

My grandparents did eggs for a living for years. They started their business in the late 50s-- right out of the depression when grocery stores just started to become more than a store with a few items other than lye, sugar, and a coke machine.
You know -before the big box stores would come in and only buy from producers that could supply the whole eastern coast.
My grandparents ended up supplying whole south central Kentucky. they were supplying a needed product at the right time, and right place-they made a lot of money and ended up on the cover of the "Jackson Energy cooperatives Kentucky Living magazine" . I was so proud of them as you can see. I was right there at the very beginning of their business, since they took care of me while my parents were at work. They learned they needed to candle, even what they knew were fresh eggs. Grandfather reported back to grandmother that his eggs were too dirty, the excitement over the purchase of an egg bather, and then the sorting machine. He made a good living and was able to retire and bought a nice beef farm.

He passed the business to his son. His son stayed in the business for about another decade. The Ag experts at the University then started telling the egg producers to put the laying hens in huge big cages and put three chickens per cage. He had chutes of water and food passing through the cages, along with water running under them to clean the droppings. The cages where stacked up pretty high; all under old chicken house roof, but the sides were all knocked out to let lots of air and light in. In the winter they put up plastic like in a green house around them.

Then the experts started telling them that they could put four, and then five, and then six -chickens in each cage- and he finally got out of the business. My Grandmother was a true lover of chickens and did not like the crowding, or the cages. Besides as big as my uncle was he was still not big enough to supply as many eggs as the chain stores were demanding, and slowly they were taking the place of family owned grocery stores.

Thirty years later- the news reported there were bacteria in the eggs (I had a hard time believing that one) No, it was on the surface of the eggs (pale yellow eggs at that)-- and the washing of the eggs didn't take care of it??? They then showed on the news that all the eggs are produced out of the Chicago area - with laying hens in a box - so small they cannot even stand up. They had to have light ???-- but all I saw was a light bulb on the outside for workers. Now how is the chicken going to produce much vitamin D in that egg? What kind of feed do they feed that chicken? Why was the egg washing not getting rid of salmonella?It did not look like they cared, about the animals or could see pass what they were doing - might harm the consumer?

My father raised fryers for a living too because it was less work - and he was working at a rubber ring plant and running a milk route. He cared about what kind of feed he gave his chickens too. Years later I find out that some feed companies and producers are or were putting arsenic in their feed because it makes the fryers put on a lot more weight - faster? Good gosh!

Sorry Doozerdoo - I got off topic - it just amazes me what they did with the poultry industry.

I am not clean with my chickens like I should - I think that is a good idea of wearing different shoes. I have geese that roam and they love to go sit by the chicken coop and look in. But let a rooster get out and he chases them all the way down the road.

Do you put down any lime in the chicken run. I have not done that yet -- it is fairly new. I am worried that I will burn their feet with it and have yet to figure out how I can put it down and keep them off of it long enough for it to be safe.

I feed mine all kinds of veg scraps. Watermelon is their favorite.
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Old 12-31-2012, 12:59 PM   #20
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Dad picked up chickens for me the minute I said I was thinking about having chickens, before we got the coop. Once coop was ready, I went to pick up the chickens. He sent them with a dozen or so watermelons. Yes, they loooooove watermelon!
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