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Old 09-11-2011, 06:56 PM   #21
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Do me a favor, Jack...no pressure on this one, okay?

I never planned on mentioning it until *after* I did it, but needed someone to reassure me that this was the way to go.

(I'm pretty stressed out with everything that is going on right now. I'm not even sure how I'm getting to work tomorrow.)
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Old 09-11-2011, 07:16 PM   #22
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Do me a favor, Jack...no pressure on this one, okay?

I never planned on mentioning it until *after* I did it, but needed someone to reassure me that this was the way to go.

(I'm pretty stressed out with everything that is going on right now. I'm not even sure how I'm getting to work tomorrow.)
I was just rereading my posts on the thread and can't see any sign of pressure coming from this direction - only answering your query with suggestions. Good luck with your project.
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Old 09-11-2011, 07:31 PM   #23
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I was just rereading my posts on the thread and can't see any sign of pressure coming from this direction - only answering your query with suggestions. Good luck with your project.

...No, that's not what I meant. There was no pressure coming from your posts. I am just thinking about the pond and the J. maple...I don't want you to add "Did you carve that snag yet?" kind of comments! (I'm rather stressed out at the moment and kind of concerned that I won't be able to do it--I don't even own a chainsaw...and I don't know how I'm gonna handle using one 15 ft. up.)

Thank you for the wish of luck.
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Old 09-12-2011, 06:37 AM   #24
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At 15 feet, you're going to have a great view of what's happening there from the upstairs windows!

Don't worry about it being cut level at the top--rain water will pool up there and soften the wood and eventually nature will take care of those flat edges.

All those side branches that have been cut will provide abundant places for interesting things to happen!

Another thing you could always do is grow a nice native vine up the tree, though I happen to like it as-is, or as-will-be. . .

Please post some 'after' pictures.
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Old 09-12-2011, 10:14 AM   #25
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I'd leave it...Give carving a try as high as you feel comfortable with (practicing on the less viewable side first) and if you think it an eyesore.... whack and hack the design away vertically to create areas of interest for the critters. Grooves and pockets facing the house would be nice and provide interesting areas for the critters to use and you to view.
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Old 09-12-2011, 08:09 PM   #26
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At 15 feet, you're going to have a great view of what's happening there from the upstairs windows!
Thanks, Teresa! I am so glad you posted this thread in the first place.

I agree completely...that was part of the plan...not only great views, but hopefully I'll get some great photos as well--especially if I can make it look more like a natural snag (I like my pictures to look natural without man made things intruding.).

(I guess I'd better start washing the windows more often if I plan to get some good pictures! )


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Don't worry about it being cut level at the top--rain water will pool up there and soften the wood and eventually nature will take care of those flat edges.


All those side branches that have been cut will provide abundant places for interesting things to happen!
I hope I can speed up the process to make it look better without the wait.

Yup, I hope to make something nice with with the nubs of the branches...and use the branches themselves to make one hell of a brushpile!



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Another thing you could always do is grow a nice native vine up the tree, though I happen to like it as-is, or as-will-be. . .

Please post some 'after' pictures.
Yes, I'm thinking of keeping it "as-will-be" without a vine probably...unless I find I end up having to cover up an eyesore!

As for pictures, it is too dark to take them...LUCKILY, Jeff took a shot or two with his cell phone. (I'll post one here.)

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I'd leave it...Give carving a try as high as you feel comfortable with (practicing on the less viewable side first) and if you think it an eyesore.... whack and hack the design away vertically to create areas of interest for the critters. Grooves and pockets facing the house would be nice and provide interesting areas for the critters to use and you to view.
I think I'll try practicing on some of the huge chunks of the trunk that are on ground level...then, when I feel comfortable, confident I'll do the front--perhaps leaving the back less finished if necessary. (I'm *hoping* to create some roosting spots for bats (and perhaps a brown creeper that I saw on the trunk last year). The article explains how to make it most enticing to them.

I am SO glad that I called the man back and went with my original plan. I'd have been kicking myself if I had to try to put it upright with the help of the neighbors backhoe!

I hope I can create those interesting areas for the critters and get some photos of them to boot.
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Old 09-13-2011, 04:52 PM   #27
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I like the chunk you?re standing upon.
I'd stand that one up in the ground alongside the original one too!
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Old 09-13-2011, 07:01 PM   #28
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I like the chunk you?re standing upon.
I'd stand that one up in the ground alongside the original one too!

Yes, that is me. ~blush~

I like it too...but I want it cut into something more manageable. Then I'd like to create/carve something out of it to sit at the base of the other one...not so tall and no need to bury it. We'll see.

Also, I'd like to put a big chunk in the woods and maybe something in the meadow. Some logs in the woods would be great as well. That would make them feel more like a real woodland, provide some nurse logs, and provide for wildlife...and fungi.
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Old 09-13-2011, 09:45 PM   #29
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snag5 A drought snag

Snags have been one of my favorite things in our habitat and are great for the red-bellied woodpeckers. I have even seen a pileated a few times, usually more common east of here where there are more pines and hardwoods. In the past we have had plenty of room for snags, but now I have a bunch more than I need, caused by the drought. The habitat now is, as my neighbor succinctly put it, a "fire hazard". We are doing the best we can, with areas kept open on our place, plus some new firebreaks I hope to have put in as soon as possible. It's a real tinderbox, but fortunately we are surrounded by open pastureland.
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Old 09-14-2011, 10:06 AM   #30
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Just a quick note to ease your mind about carving with a chainsaw 15' up. I've spent a lot of time behind a chainsaw (with the scars to prove it) and I wouldn't want to try carving off of a ladder either. Think scaffolding. It gives you a solid flat surface to stand on. You can usually rent scaffolding for a reasonable price from hardware or building supply stores; or if you know a contractor you might even be able to borrow some at no cost.

And don't worry about what it will look like; you can always whack it off later and turn it into a stand for a bird bath. Or if you really want to go crazy, by boring a few holes and some creative use of plumbing, you could use it for the water "source" of your pond/stream project. It could look like you were tapping a maple tree for maple syrup, except that the "maple sap" would be the water source for your water feature.
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