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Old 06-18-2011, 08:14 AM   #41
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C'mon dap! You've been around here long enough to know that Tuliptree is a major host plant of Eastern tiger swallowtails! (just pullin' your chain!)
I'm sure one could fill this forum with things I don't know!

Good to know. I did plant a tulip tree (it is now about 3 ft tall protected by the deer to about that height, so who knows if it will be able to grow any taller any time soon)...and I plan to plant another one. The neighbor across the way has a huge one--I was hoping it would seed itself in our yard, but no such luck yet.

...I have to admit, linrose, that I have *no idea* what the above post is in reference to...I tried looking back a little, and can't figure it out. ....Wanna enlighten me on something else I don't know (mainly what the comment is in response to)?
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Old 06-18-2011, 10:57 AM   #42
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I was surprised to see that tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) doesn't seem to support many insects at all...I am still including it, although I didn't think much of it as a kid, I really like it now. I believe it is a nectar source for hummingbirds, is it not? That is reason enough for me to include it.
That one, your post #33. Tuliptrees grow really fast so hopefully you will see them grow to maturity. We have lots of them, they are some of the tallest trees on the property in contention with the sycamores and southern red oaks.

There's a giant tuliptree in the sinkhole. A 10 year old sycamore is in front of it. 10 years is an estimate because it was about 6 feet tall when we moved here 8 years ago. I wanted to cut down the sycamore because I saw that it might interfere with the power lines above eventually but we didn't. It's going to challenge the tuliptree to a height contest. We estimate the tuliptree at about 75 feet tall. It's hard to get perspective without a person or something else to give it scale.
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Old 06-18-2011, 10:59 AM   #43
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I forgot to add the photos, oops!
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To truly appreciate the beauty of a natural landscape, look through nature's eyes.-tuliptree-sycamore-sinkhole.jpg   To truly appreciate the beauty of a natural landscape, look through nature's eyes.-sinkhole.jpg  
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Old 06-20-2011, 10:26 PM   #44
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C'mon dap! You've been around here long enough to know that Tuliptree is a major host plant of Eastern tiger swallowtails! (just pullin' your chain!)
If I didn't before, I do now!

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I forgot to add the photos, oops!
I've really begun to appreciate tulip trees more and more the older I get. I remember my uncle planting one when I was a kid. I sort of liked the leaves, but I thought they were too big for the small tree. I guess, once the tree gets to its grand size, they are proportionate.

I can't wait until mine are that big--except that I'll be a LOT older by then.
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Old 06-21-2011, 06:48 AM   #45
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They do have those huge leaves, so do sycamores. Maybe they know they're going to get tall quickly so they will soon grow into them. I know it's not the best tree for wildlife out there but just have all these swallowtails around makes it OK by me. You will see it get pretty big if you stick around a few more years, it grows very rapidly, maybe you won't see it get to 120 feet, but 40 feet or more is still pretty big!
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Old 06-21-2011, 10:27 AM   #46
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They do have those huge leaves, so do sycamores. Maybe they know they're going to get tall quickly so they will soon grow into them. I know it's not the best tree for wildlife out there but just have all these swallowtails around makes it OK by me. You will see it get pretty big if you stick around a few more years, it grows very rapidly, maybe you won't see it get to 120 feet, but 40 feet or more is still pretty big!
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They do have those huge leaves, so do sycamores. Maybe they know they're going to get tall quickly so they will soon grow into them.
~smile~ Kinda like puppies with huge feet.

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I know it's not the best tree for wildlife out there but just have all these swallowtails around makes it OK by me.
Maybe it is not among the highest scoring trees for wildlife, but that doesn't mean it is not important among the grand scheme of things. Who knows what interrelationships exist that we are all still unaware of.

Also, I'd always thought tulip trees provided nectar for hummingbirds (I'm going to try to look that up). I believe the seeds are eaten by some birds and mammals. They provide shade for wildflowers and tree seedlings that require it. ...And, if nothing else, they will make one hell of a snag some day! Now *that* would provide a lot for wildlife.


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You will see it get pretty big if you stick around a few more years, it grows very rapidly, maybe you won't see it get to 120 feet, but 40 feet or more is still pretty big!

I thought that they were rapid growers...and I'm having second thoughts about where I planted it, so I may end up moving it which will slow it down more. However, I'd like another one for out in the woodland.

I sure hope to stick around for more than a few more years. 40 ft and blooming works for me.

Speaking of blooming, I am trying to plant it in a low area so that I can see some of the blooms from above. The woodland is at the bottom of two slopes, so I'm hoping that will work. The other is at the edge of the property where it slopes down...and I can view it from the second story window of the house. I'd read to plant it where it could be viewed from second story window so you don't miss out on the flowers.

Too bad we don't own beyond the edge of our property...it drops of more, and once the tree was fairly mature, it would be like being in the mid to upper branches...no treehouse required.
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Old 06-21-2011, 11:10 AM   #47
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dapjwy, I like your description how the neighboring property drop would put your imaginary tree at walk into level.
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Old 06-21-2011, 11:55 AM   #48
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dapjwy, I like your description how the neighboring property drop would put your imaginary tree at walk into level.
Thanks, will-o-wisp. I like the idea too.

Honestly, we'd love to purchase the property behind us (no house there...the neighbor's property is L shaped. We can't afford it and I have no idea if they'd be willing to sell if we could. I guess I could ask if I can plant one there--right now that area is becoming over run by Japanese knot weed...not sure the tree could compete or not.
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Old 06-21-2011, 01:43 PM   #49
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Even if you never get to see the flowers, when the petals fall it rains yellow with an orange flame at the base, so pretty! That's what we get to see when crossvine sheds its petals, a carpet of orange!
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Old 06-21-2011, 04:21 PM   #50
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Sound really pretty.
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