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Old 07-29-2010, 10:49 AM   #31
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What a lovely story, David! I have never heard that one before. Thanks for sharing! I think your writing skills are perfect for creating a WG version!

bridget1964,

You are very kind, but I'd have no idea where to start, and I am a bit of a procrastinator--that was supposed to be posted the day I saw the post!

I'm hoping someone else would enjoy the challenge of writing it, if not, I'd need a lot of suggestions before I'd even consider trying it myself.

Anyway, here is a link to the actual story I found in a 'net search:

Why Christmas Trees Aren't Perfect
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Old 02-22-2011, 08:36 PM   #32
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"I have yet to read Bringing Nature Home." Bad boy Bad boy.... whatch gonna do when they come for you... Bad boy Bad boy. I can send you my new copy to borrow if you want to go for it now.... without the hammock out yet.
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You are very kind to offer, Equilibrium, but I thought I should check out the library first. Meant to do that the other day...

BTW, I finally got my hammock up three days ago!
I had to do a couple searches to find this, but I had to post that I *finally* got Bringing Nature Home from the library last week. I'm *such* a procratinator!

I'm over half way through it and am so glad I'm reading it.

I love the chart showing which trees support the most species. Good to know I already have quite a few of them...and others are things I've already planned to add!

It is a bit depressing to think about possibly losing my Ash trees to Emerald Ash Borer...I'm assuming it is just a matter of time before it gets here. Also, I'd hate to see my beech seedling(s) to be attacked by disease by the time they are mature. I'm still including them all, I'd just hate to lose them (or the hemlock I put in)...however, I remember, back in the 80s, someone saying he expected the flowering dogwood to be extinct in our lifetime. I keep planting them and think they (as a species) will make it.
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Old 02-22-2011, 08:41 PM   #33
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I was surprised to see that tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera) doesn't seem to support many insects at all...I am still including it, although I didn't think much of it as a kid, I really like it now. I believe it is a nectar source for hummingbirds, is it not? That is reason enough for me to include it.
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Old 05-26-2011, 04:52 AM   #34
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I missed this thread first time around but really enjoyed reading it now.

As a former more traditional, avid, gardener I keep on trying to get the balance right between wild and designed.
I realize most people are not as interested in, or willing to put in, even half the amount of time I spend on the garden.
One of the first, and standard, remarks I get from casual passerbys is
"That's a lot of work".
Although they might appreciate my effort they clearly don't want to do it themselves.
If I am struggling to find the right plants and balance with more time, experience and a real desire to fit native plants in a suburban landscape how much harder is it for the average person to garden this way?
The challenge in a small garden is first to find native plants (that is the second question "where do I get native plants? " and I have no close source to send them to). Fitting them in a limited space attractively is the next challenge. This is a really important one for most people, they want a beautifully landscaped garden that is easy to maintain (3rd important want that probably ranks 1st for most people.)

So how to we get more people to plant a native garden? and convince them a looser less manicured style is beautiful, easy and sustainable?
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Old 05-26-2011, 01:22 PM   #35
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Plant one in the city square so people can view one upclose?
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Old 05-27-2011, 06:34 AM   #36
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Not a bad idea havalotta, I like it! - if I can involve the local garden clubs environmental section. The garden club people are really important in passing on a message, after all they are the avid gardeners and plant buyers.
Imagine, instead of just 1 native garden on the public square, many native gardens all around town.
The town gardens are very traditional bedding plants rotated by season. It's hard to get them to think differently. They do tend to automatically rip out what ever is finished blooming, except, of course, for the back ground shrubs. If it's a woody plant/ shrub, it stays, all else is removed when it's past bloom time. I don't think they understand the idea of a perennial.
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Old 05-27-2011, 10:44 AM   #37
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Perhaps now would be a good time to make contact with both parties to merge the members together for a joint project such as this.
Since they've more than likely pulled the (so called) dead plants out it would be perfect timing to introduce and teach them all about the benefits of the natives along with the fact that they will return two and threefold the following years AND if left alone, save them the yearly expense!
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Old 05-27-2011, 08:56 PM   #38
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Not a bad idea havalotta, I like it! - if I can involve the local garden clubs environmental section. The garden club people are really important in passing on a message, after all they are the avid gardeners and plant buyers.
Imagine, instead of just 1 native garden on the public square, many native gardens all around town.
Go for it!

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The town gardens are very traditional bedding plants rotated by season. It's hard to get them to think differently. They do tend to automatically rip out what ever is finished blooming, except, of course, for the back ground shrubs. If it's a woody plant/ shrub, it stays, all else is removed when it's past bloom time. I don't think they understand the idea of a perennial.
~sigh~ That does not impress me at all! I can't believe they would pull out perennials--although, if they are not native it doesn't bother me as much...although I'd expect more from people who call themselves gardeners.


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Since they've more than likely pulled the (so called) dead plants out it would be perfect timing to introduce and teach them all about the benefits of the natives along with the fact that they will return two and threefold the following years AND if left alone, save them the yearly expense!
Yes, and let them know that with a succession of bloom one could have a series of seasonal gardens.
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Old 06-13-2011, 01:53 AM   #39
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That was one of the better web-sites I've seen and had the best hedge ideas I've read. Tree Islands are a good Idea too. Since implimenting some tips found there my broken weed-wacker won't need fixing and i'll only need 2 cycle oil for the chainsaw.
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Old 06-16-2011, 09:24 PM   #40
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C'mon dap! You've been around here long enough to know that Tuliptree is a major host plant of Eastern tiger swallowtails! (just pullin' your chain!)
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