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Old 05-10-2010, 10:04 AM   #21
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Pocket prairie update. We got 70 plants in this weekend, by we I mean mostly Jason, my knee went out and I wasn't much help after about 10 plants so I just placed them where they were to be planted. The bulk of the plants are now in with a few to be moved from other garden locations to the new bed. The ground is still very wet after our flooding last weekend. We got 10 1/2 inches of rain in 48 hours last Saturday and Sunday. A lot of local roads were washed out and houses flooded. The Nashville area just 1 hour south of us got the worst of it. The Opry is closed indefinitely, the stage was under 2 feet of water. It rained all the previous weekend too so I am just now able to get out into the beds.

I was really watching the shade patterns throughout the day, there is a big red oak just to the north of the bed and it does throw some shade on the middle section until about noon or so. I tried to plant the more shade tolerant species there, sweet coneflower, culver's root, new england aster etc.

Right now there's not much to photograph except a bunch of tiny plants in what looks like craters of chopped leaves. Once things get going in a few weeks I'll take some more progress shots.

Oh, and I did add three more baptisia, I was lucky to find them locally so I'm happy.
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Old 05-13-2010, 03:14 PM   #22
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Quote:
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...

Right now there's not much to photograph except a bunch of tiny plants in what looks like craters of chopped leaves. Once things get going in a few weeks I'll take some more progress shots.

....
Great job (Jason )! (Just kidding, linrose...placement is important too)

I say you should take pictures now....that will make the after pictures look that much better!
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Old 05-13-2010, 03:43 PM   #23
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linrose,
I agree with dapjwy. Please post photos of your pocket prairie growth in progress.

Watching your pocket prairie garden gradually turn into a "mature prairie" via photographs would be awesome to see.

I'd also like to hear about which plants are doing the best, and any struggling plants.

Thanks for sharing your project with us. Especially the native plant list with both botanical and common names you shared with us in post #1.
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Old 05-14-2010, 08:02 AM   #24
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OK, here are some progress shots. Still not much to look at but the good news is nothing has died yet! I haven't had to water at all because of our soaking rains two weeks ago.

First is an overhead shot like the one before for comparison. You can barely make out most of the new plants except for the baptisia which I managed to find in gallon pots. Then I have a ground level shot from the new area looking back toward the house. The last is of a mix of the old planting and new in front. The big plant is cutleaf coneflower.

The only plant I am concerned about survival with is the butterflyweed. It has not survived for me in the last three tries. I think our soil is just too moist and heavy for it. I haven't given up yet though.
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Old 05-14-2010, 05:13 PM   #25
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Linrose,
Thanks for sharing more of your pocket prairie photos.

It looks like things are coming along quite nicely!

Does anyone have any tips for increasing Linrose's chance of survival for her butterflyweed?

I'm just a beginner with the asclepias species. My seeds are still in the sprouting process in their wintersown containers.
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Old 05-14-2010, 07:49 PM   #26
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OK, here are some progress shots. Still not much to look at but the good news is nothing has died yet! I haven't had to water at all because of our soaking rains two weeks ago.

First is an overhead shot like the one before for comparison. You can barely make out most of the new plants except for the baptisia which I managed to find in gallon pots. Then I have a ground level shot from the new area looking back toward the house. The last is of a mix of the old planting and new in front. The big plant is cutleaf coneflower.

The only plant I am concerned about survival with is the butterflyweed. It has not survived for me in the last three tries. I think our soil is just too moist and heavy for it. I haven't given up yet though.
linrose,

Thank you so much for sharing the photos and your story. That will be a beautiful stretch of prairie when it fills in! I know it doesn't look like much, but you will be happy to have the picture so you can say, "This is what it started out as."

As for the butterflyweed. Would you consider adding a boulder (or several) to raise up a small area to see if it would keep it dry enough for the butterflyweed to survive?

Keep us posted,

David
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Old 05-15-2010, 09:31 AM   #27
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I hadn't considered rocks in the garden but that could be cool. I have some yellow butterflyweed in reserve I could try it out. I have some wild Asclepia tuberosa on the upland slope in the back field. The soil is poor and gravelly and the exposure is southwest so I suppose those are ideal conditions for it. Maybe I should just appreciate it there and leave the garden to more moisture tolerant plants. I did have two aromatic asters rot out, I know they like a drier soil too. I'm hoping the New England asters will like the conditions better.

This is the slope where the butterflyweed lives. Right now the golden yellow senecio is carpeting the hillside.
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Old 05-15-2010, 10:32 AM   #28
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Default Butterflyweed!

While trying to capture a photo of a butterfly this morning I stumbled upon a butterflyweed in the field. It's starting to form flower buds. It blooms with the mountain mint that grows near the dogwoods. This is a favorite spot for butterflies.
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Old 05-15-2010, 08:36 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by linrose View Post
I hadn't considered rocks in the garden but that could be cool. I have some yellow butterflyweed in reserve I could try it out. I have some wild Asclepia tuberosa on the upland slope in the back field. The soil is poor and gravelly and the exposure is southwest so I suppose those are ideal conditions for it. Maybe I should just appreciate it there and leave the garden to more moisture tolerant plants. I did have two aromatic asters rot out, I know they like a drier soil too. I'm hoping the New England asters will like the conditions better.

This is the slope where the butterflyweed lives. Right now the golden yellow senecio is carpeting the hillside.
At least you have some butterflyweed to enjoy elsewhere. I'd still like for you to grow it where you want it--unless of course it truly is too wet. I thought a raised spot--even just a small hill might be enough to keep it drained/dry enough for it.

I would imagine the New England Aster will do great there.
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Old 05-15-2010, 08:39 PM   #30
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This is the slope where the butterflyweed lives. Right now the golden yellow senecio is carpeting the hillside.

BTW, the senecio (golden ragwort, right?) seems to like moist conditions--at least that has been my experience. So, it is interesting that A. tuberosa grows in the same area.
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