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Old 02-01-2010, 03:26 PM   #11
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Great topic TimSaupe!

Here are a few of my plans for the comming summer....

Complete a lasagna bed that was started last summer but not finished.
This will be lasagna bed number 3 for me. Lasagna beds have been working really well for me.

Surround my vegetable garden to keep out those pesky deer eating machines. Still pondering different ideas.

Plant 2 more fruit trees. I've been doing reasearch on varieties of cold hardy fruit trees that will survive the frozen northwoods tundra.

Plant more native flowers/plants to attract bees, birds & beneficial insects.

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Old 02-01-2010, 04:26 PM   #12
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My goals this year are:
  • complete the south side of my driveway with natives and large rocks
  • add to my native shade garden
  • put up my modified Kinney tree swallow house and keep sparrows from invading it...
  • build a "cart" that will allow me to collect larger rocks
  • Solarize, dethatch, and plant .7 acres for a prairie planting for our school
  • Increase my native landscaping business client numbers
  • plant 1000 sq. ft. of no mow grass seed this spring.
Those are the big ones I guess-
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Old 02-01-2010, 06:43 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BooBooBearBecky View Post
Surround my vegetable garden to keep out those pesky deer eating machines.
Yikes! Isn't our native wildlife under enough stress that now we have to contend with deer-eating machines too?!? Who would build such contraptions?!? :P
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Old 02-01-2010, 09:25 PM   #14
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To continue my jihad against exotics. Primary target this year: Indian strawberry (Duchesnea indica). Yeah, maybe a bit of explosive material on each one....
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Old 02-01-2010, 10:06 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimSaupe View Post
Yikes! Isn't our native wildlife under enough stress that now we have to contend with deer-eating machines too?!? Who would build such contraptions?!? :P

ROTFLMAO!
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Old 02-02-2010, 01:27 AM   #16
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Some of my goals for 2010:
  • Search out 10 places to find appropriate native seed for my property. Find out which national forest might issue me permits for seed collection as well as parks and possibly private properties.
  • Become more active in my local Native Plant Society.
  • Try to figure out how I can make appropriate native seed more available in my area.
  • Figure out what I can do to help a local national forest in containing those collecting pine straw to their permitted areas only.
  • See what I can do in cooperation with our Native Plant Society to stop Quail Hunters from disturbing the native habitat in the historic Waterhorn District of the Francis Marion National Forest. They want to plant plants that will bring in quail in droves, which would be more than the carrying capacity for that region and it has been proven that the long leaf pine ecosystem would suffer from such action and it has been proven that quail thrive in a long leaf pine system. No alteration to plants are needed or justified in my opinion.
  • Search out advice and opinions from local ecologists on the plant communities in my area.
  • Get an ecologist out to my property to help me identify all the native plants already growing in my area.
  • Learn how to key plants.
  • Attempt to grow (my first time) some of the native seed that I was able to collect this past fall.
  • Plant more native grasses and ground covers in my reparian buffer. What I've got planted now is too far apart for them to have sex as one of my mentors would say.
  • Figure out a way to get some propagation plots for native seed growing in our area via the local native plant society and possibly other agencies.
  • Read through the information on soil on the Natural Resources Conservation Services website, go through as much of their training material as I can access on their website and to map my soil via the mapping resources available at the NRCS website.
This is just a start. I have other projects that I'll list at another time.

Last edited by MaggyNoLia; 02-02-2010 at 01:57 AM. Reason: Adding one more goal.
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Old 02-02-2010, 11:07 AM   #17
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MaggyNoLia: There should already be a detailed soil survey of North Carolina soils.

Here are the old North Carolina maps by county:

North Carolina Maps Collection : Search Results

In most cases these have been redone, but usually the newer surveys are not useful for anything except "agricultural potential". The old maps should tell you the original types of vegetation for each type of soil. They also list the types of wildlife found on e ach type of soil.
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Old 02-02-2010, 12:25 PM   #18
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"To continue my jihad against exotics." Ha ha ha... you and me both!!!
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Old 02-02-2010, 01:53 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hazelnut View Post
MaggyNoLia: There should already be a detailed soil survey of North Carolina soils.

Here are the old North Carolina maps by county:

North Carolina Maps Collection : Search Results

In most cases these have been redone, but usually the newer surveys are not useful for anything except "agricultural potential". The old maps should tell you the original types of vegetation for each type of soil. They also list the types of wildlife found on e ach type of soil.
I will definitely check those out Hazelnut. I've actually found a good bit of information as well on soils at this link

The Color of Soil | NRCS Soils

and for soil survey a link to 'Web Soil Survey (WSS) which provides soil data and information produced by the National Cooperative Soil Survey. It is operated by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS) and provides access to the largest natural resource information system in the world. NRCS has soil maps and data available online for more than 95 percent of the nationís counties and anticipates having 100 percent in the near future. The site is updated and maintained online as the single authoritative source of soil survey information'.

Web Soil Survey - Home
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Old 02-02-2010, 02:09 PM   #20
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I would definitely get access to the old ones and compare with the newer ones. In Alabama the old soil maps even have symbols for little houses that we find now as archeological remnants in the woods. South Carolina has these old soil maps too. I haven't looked in detail at North Carolina (never worked there) except that many of the Alabama planters in this area are from North Carolina and their approach to managing soils here was based on their experience with erosion and soil depletion of North Carolina soils.

(Greensboro, Al. of course is named for Greensboro North Carolina, New Bern is named for a town in N.C. and there was a community named for Lenoir for Lenoir County NC.) There is quite a lot of discussion of soil management in the local newspaper in the 1820s and 1830s by the local agricultural society members.
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