Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Miscellaneous Gardening Boards > Landscape and Garden Design

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-26-2009, 01:26 PM   #11
WG Staff
 
Staff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default

MrILoveTheAnts, may we please use one of you bee block photo at the site?
__________________
The tendency of man's nature to good is like the tendency of water to flow downwards.
-Mencius
Staff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2009, 04:45 PM   #12
1st Place Winner Winner Butterfly/Moth Contest & Official Ant Man
 
MrILoveTheAnts's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Jersey
Default

Yes go right ahead.
MrILoveTheAnts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-26-2009, 08:07 PM   #13
1st Place Winner Winner Butterfly/Moth Contest & Official Ant Man
 
MrILoveTheAnts's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Jersey
Default


Alright this is probably the garden that needs more help. In my defense though the lighting was awful. The sunflowers were not yet blooming at the time but could easily be viewed from the front yard, and did attract lots of gold finches.

The Vitex I removed only hours ago and replaced with Hydrangea paniculata, which also isn't native but looks a hell of a lot nicer and as far as I know is not invasive. I'm planting Asters around it tomorrow.

Next to the blue shed I have Liatris, and Hyssop well established. White Turtle Head (pictured below) and Trillium decipiens were also growing but not very established. I'm actually surprised one of the three Trilliums flowered and that they tolerated full sun for the whole year. I hope to have both of them spread readily.

The red Lobelia is growing next to a messy aster. I love the aster because of how many bees it attracts but the Lobelia I'm not a huge fan of. I might replant this elsewhere.

The Eastern Redbud I got as a sapling from the Arbor Day Foundation. I hope to see it flowering next year but who can say. I also think it's a host plant to one of our Giant Silk Moths but I'm not certain which one.

Under the Sunflowers was an odd mix of cherry tomato plants that came up on their own, (apparently they can reseed, neat) and some Impatients which became lost in all the foliage. Next year I'll be growing vegetables here and it should hopefully look nicer. Sunflowers are in my normal rotation of crops though, and actually come up wildly in all the gardens. One of the tallest sunflowers that came up was actually a wild one that I transplanted. Here. Compared with one that randomly came up by our bird feeder that's only 6 inches tall. Here.

The stone walk way is unfinished and something my parents wanted. As you can see pictured below it's a haven for weeds. When mowed it looks okay but needs to be weeded out. Any ideas besides Round Up?

Along the fence was a lot of Japanese Honeysuckle that I used Round Up on and greatly killed it. I cut the vines as low as I could and put the nozzle right inside the stem. A single squirt is all I use and I did this along the fence. I hope to kill it completely before I plant vegetables there next year.

The Seven Son Tree I also want to keep. It actually has caterpillars on it nibbling on the leaves, which is always neat to see on a nonnative. It's basically a smaller Crape Myrtle. Next to it for some reason I planted a rose which smells nice.... and on the other side for some reason I planted a nonnative cherry tree that gets to be 60 feet tall. Now that I think about the cherry tree I might want to get rid of it for being so close to the house.

Thoughts? Ideas? Plant Suggestions?
Attached Thumbnails
My Garden-sunflowerpatch2.jpg   My Garden-whiteturtlehead2.jpg   My Garden-tomatoeweeds.jpg   My Garden-weedscopy.jpg   My Garden-trilliumred.jpg  

MrILoveTheAnts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2009, 12:17 AM   #14
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

You can come and visit me any time. You're a stick gardener. You're sticking plants where ever you have space. That is exactly how I garden. I have to think about this but I'm leaning toward packing in anything that's a locally native pollen or nextar plant that you can get your hands on in threes. One plant that I grow on purpose that isn't native is a peony. I've liked the way the ants crawl all over them since I was a kid. It's mesmerizing watching them work the peonies. What's the deal with that plant if you know?
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2009, 12:35 AM   #15
1st Place Winner Winner Butterfly/Moth Contest & Official Ant Man
 
MrILoveTheAnts's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Jersey
Default

Peonies, I don't know exactly what the answer is but I know what you're talking about. The flower buds are coated with sap or nectar that the ants love. Most new growth on plants is covered in something that ants appreciate.

If the ants aren't stealing nectar from the opened flowers then this is a beneficial relationship for the plant usually. Though their effectiveness varies tend to harass, and sometimes prey upon, other insects that are likely eating the host plant.

If the ants are stealing nectar from the opened flowers though then they're going to far. They're preventing the plant from getting pollinated.

Another plant growing near my blue shed is Asclepias curassavica which is tropical in origin. And very likely an annual this far north. So I'll have to either pot it up for the winter (which is hard to do with Asclepias) and or save the seeds. The thing is though Tapinoma sessile are able to run across the milky surface of the plant and get the nectar. So I'm getting very little in the way of pollination. And I've only seen ants working the flowers.
Attached Thumbnails
My Garden-antsmilkweed.jpg  
MrILoveTheAnts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2009, 12:46 AM   #16
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

Are you ever outside at night? Are you interested in host species for moths?
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-27-2009, 01:21 AM   #17
1st Place Winner Winner Butterfly/Moth Contest & Official Ant Man
 
MrILoveTheAnts's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Jersey
Default

The larger silk moths I like. As for the dime a dozen brown moths ... I suppose if the caterpillar is showy, like the Red Hooded Owlet.
MrILoveTheAnts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2009, 02:27 PM   #18
Official Plant Nerd
 
Equilibrium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Default

Hey!!! Did you know you're a celebrity? One of your photos is showing for the Insects and Arachnids forum!
__________________
"Be who you are and say what you feel, because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind."
- Dr. Seuss
Equilibrium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2009, 02:30 PM   #19
1st Place Winner Winner Butterfly/Moth Contest & Official Ant Man
 
MrILoveTheAnts's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: New Jersey
Default

Yes, I think it was Staff who asked if they could use one. I said yes.
MrILoveTheAnts is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-30-2009, 03:56 PM   #20
WG Facilitator
 
biigblueyes's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Cajun Country, Louisiana, USA
Default

I see that you can take cuttings from Asclepias curassavica, but I dont' find specific instructions. Sorry. . .
__________________
My yarden and I lean a little to the wild side.
biigblueyes is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
garden

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:41 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2