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Old 07-29-2016, 12:06 PM   #1
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Default Golden groundsel senecio aureus groundcover

I found this website and its archives
https://carolynsshadegardens.com/tag/golden-groundsel/

after listening to
Larry Weaner and his new book ?Garden Revolution? ? The Native Plant Podcast
.
A couple of plant recommendations caught my attention especially senecio aureus.

If you have ever looked for a native ground cover that can flower in shady conditions it looks like this might fill the bill. It does not like soil that is constantly dry but with normal garden conditions and along side other woodland type natives and a decomposing leafy organic matter type mulch this looks good in the many pictures shown.

Carolyns Shade Gardens blog shows plenty of pictures and discusses growing natives for shade.

I'm going to pick up Larry Weaner's "Garden Revolution" as his advice for native plant gardening was just what a habitat gardener could use as we pick plants and go about growing them.

Quote:
I write a lot about the things we do at Carolyn’s Shade Gardens to support the environment: gardening organically without herbicides and chemical fertilizers, doing little supplemental watering, composting, mulching with ground leaves, getting rid of our lawn, landscaping with large quantities of native plants, and promoting natives at the nursery.
Quote:
You can read more about these practices in these posts among others:

Your Native Woodland: If You Build it They Will Come, how to create your own woodland filled with native plants


My Thanksgiving Oak Forest, the importance of native plants to our survival

Your Most Precious Garden Resource, step-by-step guide to mulching with ground leaves

Letting Go Part 1: The Lawn, the dangers of lawn chemicals to ourselves and the environment

Do You Know Where Your Mulch Comes From?, toxic substances in shredded hardwood mulch
Quote:
My guide to creating a native woodland has been especially popular. However, most gardeners don’t have vast areas of woods to convert to native plants but still want to make a difference. And I am sure that most people realize that planting three milkweed plants, though admirable and to be encouraged, is not going to save the monarch butterflies. So what can you do?
One solution is to find ways to include large quantities—a critical mass—of native plants in your garden, no matter what size. You can accomplish this by replacing non-native ground covers like pachysandra, vinca, ivy, euonymus, and turf grass with native ground cover plants. It is easy to do and you can start small by using spreading native plants like the violets above as edging for your existing beds. Soon you will be eliminating whole swathes of your lawn! Here are some more ideas of plants to use:
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Old 07-29-2016, 01:33 PM   #2
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There are many woodland plants to choose from since not all woodlands are the same across even just the continental U.S. But at the link are nine ground covers for north eastern gardens that would do well if found locally for your garden.

The way the plants are placed in swathes instead of singly is what I find appealing about the garden shown.

https://carolynsshadegardens.com/201...hey-will-come/
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Old 07-29-2016, 11:16 PM   #3
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I put this plant in a bed within a small lawn area in the context of a woodland garden. In this context, it pretty quickly took over. More sheepish bed denizens had to be moved (or were lost) as the groundsel found its limits. But it makes a beautiful mass. Perhaps not a good partner in a proper flower bed.
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Old 07-31-2016, 10:59 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by Amadeus View Post
I put this plant in a bed within a small lawn area in the context of a woodland garden. In this context, it pretty quickly took over. More sheepish bed denizens had to be moved (or were lost) as the groundsel found its limits. But it makes a beautiful mass. Perhaps not a good partner in a proper flower bed.
Great explanation of your experience; mine was very similar.

I have used (and still have) golden ragwort in part of my "woodland" landscaping around my house (Perhaps I should've put "landscape" in quotations too.). However, in my newer beds, I have opted not to include it and allow a spot for those which can't take the competition.

I do view it as a groundcover--although I don't think that was my original vision; I expected more of a mix of woodland wildflowers. As Amadeus stated, some of the more delicate ones will be crowded out.

The plants that have done well amongst my golden ragwort include wild geranium, bloodroot, asters, ferns, and probably some others that seem to have disappeared with the summer heat. I'll look for some photos from spring and post them if I find them.

One thing to note: after blooming, many may consider the dried stalks unbecoming--perhaps even the white fluffy seedheads may offend some. Once dry, they would be easy to remove by hand. I have often considered mowing on a high setting and letting them leaf out fresh--but I've never tried it.
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Old 07-31-2016, 11:17 AM   #5
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In my search, so far, I've only found close-ups...but still it gives an idea of what else can grow among the ragwort. I notice now that there are may apples and Greek valerian (native despite its common name)--both of which I forgot to mention earlier.

I'm still looking for a shot of the dogwood in bloom with the mix of wildflowers underneath. No luck yet.


Golden groundsel senecio aureus  groundcover-goldenragwort.jpg

Golden groundsel senecio aureus  groundcover-springmix.jpg

Golden groundsel senecio aureus  groundcover-img_4571.jpg

Golden groundsel senecio aureus  groundcover-img_4579.jpg

Here...I found some of the seedheads in fluff (but not the dry stalks):

Golden groundsel senecio aureus  groundcover-img_8035.jpg
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Old 08-01-2016, 08:31 AM   #6
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The golden ragwort is really pretty. It blooms in the spring. I really lack spring blooms. The birds probably enjoy the seeds
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Old 08-01-2016, 05:50 PM   #7
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The golden ragwort is really pretty. It blooms in the spring. I really lack spring blooms. The birds probably enjoy the seeds
The bold yellow is a welcome sight (and a nice contrast) to many of the other woodland wildflowers.
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Old 08-02-2016, 07:32 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
There are many woodland plants to choose from since not all woodlands are the same across even just the continental U.S. But at the link are nine ground covers for north eastern gardens that would do well if found locally for your garden.

The way the plants are placed in swathes instead of singly is what I find appealing about the garden shown.

https://carolynsshadegardens.com/201...hey-will-come/
Thanks Gloria Nice find.... Swaths of plantings are so much more natural in appearance. Tagged and saved.
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Old 08-02-2016, 03:44 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
In my search, so far, I've only found close-ups...but still it gives an idea of what else can grow among the ragwort. I notice now that there are may apples and Greek valerian (native despite its common name)--both of which I forgot to mention earlier.


Here...I found some of the seedheads in fluff (but not the dry stalks):
Nice pictures.
Does anyone have any pictures of the foliage as ground cover after the flowers have stopped blooming?
How late in the season does the foliage remain green? If there is no rain does the foliage brown off and die back?
I have become very comfortable with the look of seed heads and drying plant stalks so that would not be an issue for me.

Thanks for the feedback everyone. I have an urban garden that's a little bigger than most in the neighborhood and I like good sized patches of flowers especially lower ground covers.
I have seen Piet Oudolf's newer home garden plantings and I like the way he sprawls lower ground covers with patches of tall plants. It looks good and is not so intimidating to non-gardeners garden expectations.

Check out this Garden Design article with a few pictures. I like the idea and the look. Putting it together myself may not have the artistry of Oudolf but should work well with habitat philosophy.

Piet Oudolf's Next Wave | Garden Design

Piet Oudolf's Next Wave, Photo Gallery - Gallery | Garden Design

Quote:
Other plants (very strong perennials that could compete with native and spontaneous vegetation) went in at some distance from each other, more or less randomly. They included late-flowering robust perennials, but also earlier ones like Monarda bradburyana, which flowers from the beginning of June. Between the grass and perennials, Piet then sowed a meadow mix created by the Dutch company Cruydt-Hoeck containing Dutch native grasses and wildflower perennials, such as Dianthus carthusianorum and Valeriana officinalis.
Quote:
This was definitely an unconventional plant combination. So why do it? “It was about a creating a solution,” said Piet, “less maintenance for the future, and an experiment to see how robust perennials would grow with native grasses and wildflowers.” Framed that way, the new garden began to make a lot of sense. I could see how the ornamental grasses, including Calamagrostis, Panicum virgatum (the prairie species known as switchgrass), and Festuca mairei (a drought-tolerant species from North Africa) would provide long-term basic structure. And the flowers with intense color — the blue spire of camassia and the deep magenta-pink of the cranesbill Geranium ‘Patricia’ — would be especially striking when seen dotted around in grass.
Quote:
The dominant flowering season is from June to October. Many of the perennials are species of North American origin, reflecting the long fascination Europeans have had with the continent’s flora. There are asters, species of Eupatorium (Joe Pye weed), Helenium (sneezeweed), Vernonia (ironweed), and relatively new in cultivation here, Monarda bradburiana (Eastern bee balm). “The grasses are slowly spreading among the perennials,” said Piet. “It will become like a perennial meadow.” Key to the aesthetic is the random location of the perennials. Except that it is not random, but the result of Piet’s intuitive placing of plants to create a subtle underlying order. Defining that order, I thought to myself, would probably require a Ph.D. and a very powerful computer. Better just to enjoy it.
If you like your garden a bit more traditional check out the native and native cultivars shown here at Mt. Cuba when you scroll down the page.

https://carolynsshadegardens.com/201...ormal-gardens/

and here.

https://www.mtcubacenter.org/images/...nal_Format.pdf

The book "Garden Revolution" by Larry Weaner , came in the mail. I like it!
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Golden groundsel senecio aureus  groundcover-13640716_10209077715932980_1467362232913636057_o.jpg  
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