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Old 12-22-2015, 09:25 PM   #21
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I planted hundreds of trees when I moved here. Most were tiny seedlings. My neighbors teased me. Let me get out my magnifying glass. Now those seedlings are 30 feet tall.

Yay, Ellen! Bet those same neighbors are enjoying your trees now. I added two very little oaks and a tiny Sycamore this fall. Can't wait to watch them grow.
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Old 12-23-2015, 12:22 PM   #22
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Yay, Ellen! Bet those same neighbors are enjoying your trees now. I added two very little oaks and a tiny Sycamore this fall. Can't wait to watch them grow.
kat Unfortunately even in this rural area I am surrounded by chemlawners like yourself. I love all plants. I'm sure they think my property looks too wild but I love it like that. I hope your trees do well. Sycamores have beautiful bark. I get lots of Oak volunteers here. I am running out of room so I decided to make hedgerows along all my horse pastures. The most fun thing is to discover new plant volunteers and determining what they are.
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Old 12-27-2015, 02:09 PM   #23
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I've had a similar experience with a Box Elder that is in a bad spot in my yard (waaaay too close to the neighbor's garage). I've cut/chopped/hacked at it year after year and it just keeps coming back. This spring, I put a 5-gallon bucket over the little stump and placed a brick on top of it. I think I finally WON!!! I haven't seen any sprouts at all this year.

Remember that mulberry I had topped in the spring? That bugger started to sprout BIG time after a few months. I asked my son to go out there with an ax and girdle it. We'll see how that worked out.

Good luck with that Japanese Maple...and I agree, you should get a "Survivors" award of some sort
I actually planted two box elders and have encouraged the volunteer red mulberry that has popped up. Should I be sad that I did so? Are they that obnoxious? Both are plants that are native to my region, but hadn't been on my land before.
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Old 12-27-2015, 08:15 PM   #24
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My one volunteer box elder has not been aggressive at all. I love red mulberries. They do ok in shade and wildlife love the berries. My horses love the berries too. I think kat had a white mulberry.
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Old 12-27-2015, 08:26 PM   #25
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I've had a similar experience with a Box Elder that is in a bad spot in my yard (waaaay too close to the neighbor's garage). I've cut/chopped/hacked at it year after year and it just keeps coming back. This spring, I put a 5-gallon bucket over the little stump and placed a brick on top of it. I think I finally WON!!! I haven't seen any sprouts at all this year.

Remember that mulberry I had topped in the spring? That bugger started to sprout BIG time after a few months. I asked my son to go out there with an ax and girdle it. We'll see how that worked out.
I've done the "bucket thing" before--actually, I used an old well cap I'd found nearby...and just recently, I remembered how successful it was and plan to use buckets, pots, anything I can to try the same technique on the locust trees that keep popping up.

I suggest you employ that technique on your persistent mulberry.


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Good luck with that Japanese Maple...and I agree, you should get a "Survivors" award of some sort
Et tu, Brute'?
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Old 01-02-2016, 09:14 AM   #26
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I actually planted two box elders and have encouraged the volunteer red mulberry that has popped up. Should I be sad that I did so? Are they that obnoxious? Both are plants that are native to my region, but hadn't been on my land before.
I like box elders, and they are also native here, but this one was just too close to the neighbor's garage and too large to move. They do like to freely re-seed, so you may have more volunteers than you need or want as yours grow. The seedlings can look very much like poison ivy as well, in case you didn't already know that.

The mulberry I had topped was a non-native white one. Berries are inedible for humans (NO taste at all!). The birds enjoyed them but the tree was overtaking an entire area in the back yard. It dropped so many berries that the area was unusable for the whole summer. Smelled like rotten, fermented fruit and it was slimy to walk on. Yuck, yuck, yuck!!! I decided to have it chopped of and replace it with something the birds would enjoy just as much, eventually. I planted a sycamore back there and an oak nearby. If it had been a red mulberry, native to this area and with edible fruit, I probably would have left it alone. Mulberry also reseeds easily.
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Old 01-02-2016, 09:16 AM   #27
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I've done the "bucket thing" before--actually, I used an old well cap I'd found nearby...and just recently, I remembered how successful it was and plan to use buckets, pots, anything I can to try the same technique on the locust trees that keep popping up.

I suggest you employ that technique on your persistent mulberry.




Et tu, Brute'?
Can't use the bucket technique on the mulberry...I had the tree guy leave it about 20' tall as a snag, I don't have any buckets that big
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Old 01-04-2016, 10:00 AM   #28
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I sort of have a thing about looking for beauty in some of the most common, and for this reason sometimes overlooked, native plants. The box elder seems to be one of these. MoBot (the Missouri Botanical Garden site) acknowledges that it can be "invasive" in certain contexts. I had one in a woodland context that grew without producing seedlings at all. I enjoyed having it. They are dioecious. Perhaps there were none nearby enough for breeding. But, as all maples do, it really added a nice bright green to the early spring palette. (This is not to say that in some contexts it might be unwanted because of its ability to take over there.)
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Old 01-04-2016, 10:28 AM   #29
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I have one box elder volunteer. I enjoy it.
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Old 01-04-2016, 12:22 PM   #30
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Can't use the bucket technique on the mulberry...I had the tree guy leave it about 20' tall as a snag, I don't have any buckets that big
~smile~ no buckets that big--

Cool that you left it as a snag for wildlife...I just hope it doesn't sprout all over...and up too high for you to deal with.

I too left a giant snag in our yard...I'm glad you thought to do the same...hope it dies immediately and attracts lots of wildlife for you.
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