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Old 07-11-2015, 08:16 AM   #91
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Originally Posted by will-o-wisp View Post
And I guess I'm still doing FlowerPower with the rest of this crew.
~smile~ I like that. A great new meaning to the phrase "flower power"!

Flower power promotes pollinators power (and so many more intricate relationships) which result in ecosystem power. (Oh well, that sounded much better in my head.)
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Old 07-11-2015, 08:17 AM   #92
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Yeah, man, UP with flower power
I don't know if WildlifeGardeners still has a Facebook page, but that might make for a good post.
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Old 07-11-2015, 08:21 AM   #93
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I need a few suggestions for adding plants that would bloom now.

In the front sidewalk strip the orange of the butterfly weed is attracting positive attention from neighbors. I'd like to enhance the effect by adding a deep purple flowering plant that blooms at the same time that is native. Even if it is native to a little further south like the Stokes aster if it brings pollinators.
I do have the native petunia and Stokesia blooming with it now but they are both more of a pale lavender not the deep purple that would set the orange off.
A deep blue would work also.
And not much taller then the butterfly weed would be best but a spiky taller plant would also work.
I forgot to mention Purple Prairie Clover! How could I have left out one of my favorite plants? Shame on me

I love my PP Clover and it blooms at the same time my Butterfly Weed does.
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Old 07-11-2015, 08:23 AM   #94
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~smile~ I like that. A great new meaning to the phrase "flower power"!

Flower power promotes pollinators power (and so many more intricate relationships) which result in ecosystem power. (Oh well, that sounded much better in my head.)
Looks pretty good on "paper", too, Dap!
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Old 07-11-2015, 10:20 AM   #95
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Looks pretty good on "paper", too, Dap!
~smile~

Thanks. Maybe you can tweak it since your comment inspired it.
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Old 01-03-2016, 11:44 PM   #96
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Hi - so, random thread revival. I just got excited because sticks, blobs and creepers reminded me of this autumnal take by the landscapers with PermaDesign in Santa Fe (PermaDesign | Fall Color Rocks the Rockies").

The photo is grainy, but you can kind of see the stick-blob-creeper effect. The Penstemon pinifolius is the low level (though individually would be more of a blob than a creeper) and also a mini-stick, since the seedheads poke up from late summer on. The "low-grow" version of Rhus trilobata is a blob, sitting higher than the Penstemon. The Foresteria neomexicana is more stick, echoing but different from the Penstemon.

If we could see it in real life, we'd probably find a nice textural balance; Rhus trilobata has a very sturdy feel about it in foliage and branch, and it would contrast well with the Privet's more delicate-looking leaves. The Pineleaf Penstemon is a great accent for the others. That all would look good in summer, too (and the Penstemon has very nice, long-lasting red blooms). The Penstemon is semi-evergreen, and the bark makes the Privet nice for winter also.

I noticed this picture for the fall color so bright it looks like it could be a country's flag -- but it's a good habitat combination, too. The Privet and Sumac both do useful berries, and the Penstemon is of course a hummingbird magnet.

Just an inspired wild west combination on multiple levels! In a roomier setting I might add a tall grass, like a Muhly or Sorghastrum nutans or something to further diversify texture.
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Native plant combinations-2012-10-22_18-18-50_770-1-.jpg  
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Old 01-04-2016, 06:35 AM   #97
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Originally Posted by erinalberty View Post
Hi - so, random thread revival. I just got excited because sticks, blobs and creepers reminded me of this autumnal take by the landscapers with PermaDesign in Santa Fe (PermaDesign | Fall Color Rocks the Rockies").

The photo is grainy, but you can kind of see the stick-blob-creeper effect. The Penstemon pinifolius is the low level (though individually would be more of a blob than a creeper) and also a mini-stick, since the seedheads poke up from late summer on. The "low-grow" version of Rhus trilobata is a blob, sitting higher than the Penstemon. The Foresteria neomexicana is more stick, echoing but different from the Penstemon.

If we could see it in real life, we'd probably find a nice textural balance; Rhus trilobata has a very sturdy feel about it in foliage and branch, and it would contrast well with the Privet's more delicate-looking leaves. The Pineleaf Penstemon is a great accent for the others. That all would look good in summer, too (and the Penstemon has very nice, long-lasting red blooms). The Penstemon is semi-evergreen, and the bark makes the Privet nice for winter also.

I noticed this picture for the fall color so bright it looks like it could be a country's flag -- but it's a good habitat combination, too. The Privet and Sumac both do useful berries, and the Penstemon is of course a hummingbird magnet.

Just an inspired wild west combination on multiple levels! In a roomier setting I might add a tall grass, like a Muhly or Sorghastrum nutans or something to further diversify texture.
Thanks for updating the thread. I know so little about dryland plants that it's good to see such color. (And muhly and sorghastrum improve most plant vignettes, IMHO.)
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Old 01-05-2016, 07:31 PM   #98
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I don't know your plants either...is this a native privet or those commonly used in landscaping?
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Old 01-06-2016, 06:16 PM   #99
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I don't know your plants either...is this a native privet or those commonly used in landscaping?
It's a New Mexico Privet. Forestiera neomexicana, aka Forestiera pubescens. It's native to much of the west. I think you are thinking of Ligustrum/common privet, which isn't native.
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Old 01-06-2016, 07:15 PM   #100
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It's a New Mexico Privet. Forestiera neomexicana, aka Forestiera pubescens. It's native to much of the west. I think you are thinking of Ligustrum/common privet, which isn't native.
Thanks for clarifying.
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