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Old 07-29-2010, 11:43 AM   #1
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Default Japanese Stiltgrass Fungus Disease Spreading Through Region

Japanese Stiltgrass Fungus Disease Spreading Through Region
07/22/2010
By Forester, Russ Richardson

JAPANESE STILTGRASS FUNGUS DISEASE SPREADING THROUGH REGION
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The fungus disease killing Japanese stiltgrass, a locally common annual weed, has been rapidly spreading through the region giving some hope that the toxic plant might someday become a pesky ditch weed instead the severe ecological threat it has developed into.

Japanese stiltgrass was introduced to the US over 90 years ago and the fungus killing local stiltgrass is the first time any disease has been identified that kills the weed.

The fungus, known as Bipolaris, that infects and kills Japanese stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum) was first photographed locally in 2008 and...
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Old 08-09-2010, 11:50 AM   #2
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My first reaction is where can I get some to kill of my microstegium, but the way things work, it would probably kill off a bunch of other, beneficial stuff, too. We'll see.

Do any of you have advice on getting rid of microstegium? I didn't have any until this year. It seems to have come in with nursery plantings, or maybe from construction materials when I redid my driveway a year ago, judging by where it is. I pull it out, but like a hydra, many more come up in its place. I sprayed glyphosate on some of it, but when I just went out to pull out the dead plants, underneath were new shoots coming up. There must be a way to get rid of it.
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Old 08-11-2010, 01:13 AM   #3
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Yup, probably came from the "clean" fill they used when you redid your driveway.... either that or the "top soil" they brought in. I wouldn't spray glyphosate, I'd use a rubber glove then a cloth glove over that and dip your hand in and "massage" the plant. You won't end up with overspray and just make sure you hold off applying it until the temps cool down. You need to apply when the day time temps are going to be under 80 for a week straight otherwise the chemical won't translocate to the roots well since the plant's shutting down at high temps to conserve energy. Then after about 2 weeks, cut it down to ground level. Don't dig that one up. A friend of mine sent me some interesting research on the fungus. I'll try to dig it up for you. No promises since I put it someplace where I'd be able to find it and you know how that goes.
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Old 08-12-2010, 08:50 AM   #4
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Thanks for the glove of death idea. I did spray when it was hot - it is hot here from June-Sept, which makes eliminating it in the summer impossible, but that is probably why spraying it didn't work.
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Old 08-12-2010, 11:30 AM   #5
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Default Japanese Stiltgrass, Least Wanted Poster

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Microstegium vimineum
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Japanese Stiltgrass, Least Wanted

PCA Alien Plant Working Group - Japanese Stiltgrass (Microstegium vimineum)
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MANAGEMENT OPTIONS
A variety of control methods are available for stiltgrass, depending on the extent of the infestation, the type of habitat, and the availability of labor and other resources. Preventing the introduction of stiltgrass from infested to non-infested areas should be a priority. Early control of new infestations will also reduce the likelihood of establishment and expansion. Manual removal of plants results in unavoidable disturbance to the soil which can result in additional germination of stiltgrass seed. Using an herbicide leaves the plants and soil in place, thus minimizing that likelihood...
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Old 08-13-2010, 08:48 AM   #6
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Thank you for the link. I have been manually pulling it up and will stop doing so. I hate to spray round-up, but the article at least says which kind is the least toxic to amphibians (round-up pro, vs classic), and I have a lot of toads and frogs.
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Old 08-14-2010, 03:29 PM   #7
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I found some notes on this, "The fungus is as tenacious as the invasive plant (i.e., both can overwinter) and is taking a toll on the stiltgrass, by reducing its presence. The fungus also attacks other non-native warm season grasses (such as bentgrass) and native invasives (such as cheatgrass). Too soon to tell what may come of this development. Will the fungus keep stiltgrass from coming back into previously infected areas? What effect will this fungus have on the other understory species, the natives (many of which are medicinal or otherwise harvest for their non-timber forest products)? I'm pretty sure I have seen it on black cohosh at the MPWG field sites in George Washington Jefferson National Forest - started seeing it maybe two years ago." And here's a link to an article on the progress and spread of the Bipolaris fungus in Japanese stiltgrass, JAPANESE STILTGRASS FUNGUS DISEASE SPREADING THROUGH REGION and good slide show here, http://www.mipn.org/2008%20MIPN%20co...20workshop.pdf. If anyone wants to get a little bit more "into" the Bipolaris..... http://mipn.org/Flory%20Restoration%...gy%2020081.pdf. turttle> I think you're gonna have a tough time getting your hands on RoundUp Pro. I have no idea why the public at large has no problems getting their hands on the "classic" RU but many states require an applicator's license to buy RU Pro which is definitley the lesser of the evils.... go figure. You can mix your own by purchasing glyphosate concentrate and a non-ionic surfactant. I use this formulation instead of RoundUp all the time.
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