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Old 07-29-2010, 11:11 AM   #1
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Default Is it too late to stop kudzu?

Is it too late to stop kudzu?
Monday, July 26, 2010 02:51 AM
By Gina Potthoff
The Columbus Dispatch

Is it too late to stop kudzu? | The Columbus Dispatch
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Ronald Solomon is not looking forward to doing battle in his front yard.
His opponent, after all, is a wiry scourge that has taken over the South.

It's Pueraria montana, or kudzu, a green vine that most experts thought couldn't grow in southern Ohio until a few years ago. The winters, they said, are too cold for the invasive plant to survive.
But here it is. And...
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Old 07-29-2010, 01:54 PM   #2
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Actually Kudzu is easily controlled by grazing, but State governments apparently do not recognize it or do not care.
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Old 07-29-2010, 09:11 PM   #3
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That would work fine on a ranch, but it would probably be problematic and expensive in most areas. We don't have it, thank God. But we have a lot of other highly invasive species of plants. Once they get way out of control, it's very hard to fight them. My fight against them are sometimes largely just token efforts...when I have the time to do anything.
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Old 07-30-2010, 12:16 AM   #4
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Look in the yellow pages for Rent-A-Goat?
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Old 07-30-2010, 12:31 AM   #5
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Apparently it was imported to feed live stock. I love all the videos Green Dean has on youtube but wish he focused more on the cooking aspect or had a fallow up video showing more of that.
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Old 07-30-2010, 07:29 AM   #6
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Kudzu was first introduced as a novel plant that could be used for grazing animals--It is high in nitrogen and probably not good for a straight diet.

But the invasiveness of the plant was perpetuted by government programs who used CCC workers to plant kudzu for erosion control. And that's where it is now. The entire landscape of the South owned by the government is blanketed with Kudzu.

It is along roadways, power line right of ways, National forests, and just about all of the land that is not actively maintained by private ownership.

It will swollow a an abandoned house or barn in one season and it smothers out the natural forest trees.

The Amazing Story of Kudzu


Kudzu root or kuzu is a starch that can be used as a thickener for gravies and sauces like corn starch. The deep roots concentrate nutrients and are used in natural medicine for various preparations:

Kudzu or kuzu drinks are useful home remedies for many common ailments, including digestion problems, fever and the flu.
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