Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Invasive Species > Invasive & Potentially Invasive Flora

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-07-2013, 05:58 PM   #1
WG Staff
 
Staff's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default Butterfly Bush – Be Careful What You Plant

Butterfly Bush – Be Careful What You Plant
ChesterCoExtButterfly
Posted on February 12, 2012

Butterfly Bush – Be Careful What You Plant | ChesterCoExtButterfly
Excerpt from above:
Quote:
When you are planning a butterfly garden, one of the things you do is research which plants will attract them. You want to make sure that you have both host plants and nectar plants so that the caterpillar and the adult butterfly have the food that they need to sustain them. The problem is that some plants that are recommended by garden centers, on the internet and in reputable gardening books are not quite what they seem. Such is the case with the butterfly bush (Buddleja/Buddleia davii).

The butterfly bush species from Asia and Central America are popular ornamental plants widely used to attract butterflies. There are more than 100 species of Buddleja worldwide and additional cultivars are being developed. Buddleja species are currently found throughout the eastern, southern and western states here in the United States. They are attractive and colorful and they do attract butterflies.

But there are two big problems with these plants, according to Doug Tallamy, PhD, professor and chair of the department of entomology and wildlife ecology at the University of Delaware in Newark. Because they are not native to our region these plants are not equipped to feed the beneficial insects and birds that are common in this area. This in turn disrupts…
__________________
The tendency of man's nature to good is like the tendency of water to flow downwards.
-Mencius
Staff is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2013, 06:26 PM   #2
Salamander
 
KC Clark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Central Ohio
Default

Whomever came up with name "Butterfly Bush" had a great marketing idea. When I used to have butterfly bushes, I had co-workers from Australia and England. When they saw one of my plants, they surprised me when they called it Buddleia. None of them thought much of it. Years later, I found out that England and Australia have a big problem with Buddleia so their dislike of my plant made sense.

Convincing people not to plant butterfly bush is an uphill battle. People want to see butterflies and butterfly bush makes that happen. Also, trying to convince most people that butterfly bush is invasive is close to impossible. If they don't see butterfly bushes popping up in their yard, they don't believe.

Buttonbush (Cephalanthus occidentalis) is the alternative that I push.
KC Clark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2013, 08:27 PM   #3
Heron
 
sprucetree's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Michigan/detroit
Default

I think the bushes and flowers get alot of attention as butterfly magnets. When it comes to multi-purpose vegetation that birds can use for nesting, Hummers can feed off of and bees can utilize a good oak, tulip tree, basswood and dogwood will fit the bill.

The butterfly bush I planted in zone 6a would die back every year, it wasn't long before I ran it through the shredder.
__________________
Prairie Plants
First year they sleep
Second year they creep
Third year they leap; So plant some today
sprucetree is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2013, 08:31 PM   #4
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Hopefully the word is getting out.

I agree it is an uphill battle...perhaps knowing that England and Australia despise it for its invasiveness will help turn the tide.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2013, 02:12 AM   #5
Rock Star
 
will-o-wisp's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Piedmont area NJ USA
Default

Those darn butterfly bushes are capable of reappearing years after being removed!
I had one reappear 5 or 6 years after all had been removed and I didn't recognize it until it bloomed since I just wasn't expecting it.
What about bronze fennel? I am so reluctant (it's also very difficult to successfully dig out all the deep roots) to entirely get rid of it since I have a good population of returning black swallowtails. They will go to the dill but I have only seen 1 go to all the Zizia I have planted. That one caterpillar just seemed to be laying on top of a Zizia leaf and not eating.

I saw in another of your posts that you will also use dwarf snapdragons KC. Can you remind me what they attract?
I have planted snapdragons in the past for my neighbor and wouldn't mind adding some this year if they are good host plants.
will-o-wisp is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2013, 11:47 AM   #6
Salamander
 
KC Clark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Central Ohio
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by will-o-wisp View Post
I saw in another of your posts that you will also use dwarf snapdragons KC. Can you remind me what they attract?
buckeye butterflies
KC Clark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-30-2013, 10:49 PM   #7
Salamander
 
KC Clark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Central Ohio
Default

http://floranorthamerica.org/files/Buddleja03j.CH%20for%20Prov%20Pub.pdf

Somebody posted this link somewhere that led me to find native North American butterfly bushes (genus Buddleja). They are all found in the southwest. The list is:

  • Buddleja utahensis
  • Buddleja marrubiifolia
  • Buddleja racemosa racemosa
  • Buddleja racemosa incana
  • Buddleja scordioides
EDIT: If you want to find some of these for sale, I suggest spelling it "Buddleia"

Last edited by KC Clark; 04-30-2013 at 10:57 PM. Reason: Additional info
KC Clark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-26-2017, 02:44 PM   #8
Salamander
 
KC Clark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Central Ohio
Default

Last Friday, I became aware of an ongoing Eagle Scout project. I was concerned because the scout's mentor is a retired science teacher who spreads bad info amongst the students I work with. I contacted a friend who told me where the butterfly habitat plantings were taking place. Looked at one of the spots yesterday. The scout's project had put in butterfly bush, lilac, and rose of sharon. Was talking to my wife about it and she said I should talk with my son. I did and found out his high school ecology class had toured that site a few hours before I was there. My son was surprised the teacher had singled out the butterfly bush as a great thing to plant since my son has heard from me all his life that butterfly bush was not to be used. The teacher did push the importance of planting native plants but apparently has not bothered to figure out where the plants are from that he is praising. Looked the teacher up and found photos he posted of the area. He is very proud of the "restoration area," including the Queen Anne's Lace, a non-native invasive that is officially banned in Ohio. I expected to find QAL because the photos that alerted me to the scout project were of black swallowtail chrysalises. It is like black swallowtails never existed in Ohio until Europeans brought over their plants.

My son is a senior. Always figured if I had to contact a teacher about questionable teachings, it would have something to do with history or politics. Now 3+ years in, the time has come but it is a unexpected subject.
Attached Thumbnails
Butterfly Bush – Be Careful What You Plant-img_20170925_191106426-1-.jpg   Butterfly Bush – Be Careful What You Plant-img_20170925_191115115-1-.jpg   Butterfly Bush – Be Careful What You Plant-img_20170925_191201649-1-.jpg  
KC Clark is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-30-2017, 05:52 PM   #9
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by KC Clark View Post
Last Friday, I became aware of an ongoing Eagle Scout project. I was concerned because the scout's mentor is a retired science teacher who spreads bad info amongst the students I work with. I contacted a friend who told me where the butterfly habitat plantings were taking place. Looked at one of the spots yesterday. The scout's project had put in butterfly bush, lilac, and rose of sharon. Was talking to my wife about it and she said I should talk with my son. I did and found out his high school ecology class had toured that site a few hours before I was there. My son was surprised the teacher had singled out the butterfly bush as a great thing to plant since my son has heard from me all his life that butterfly bush was not to be used. The teacher did push the importance of planting native plants but apparently has not bothered to figure out where the plants are from that he is praising. Looked the teacher up and found photos he posted of the area. He is very proud of the "restoration area," including the Queen Anne's Lace, a non-native invasive that is officially banned in Ohio. I expected to find QAL because the photos that alerted me to the scout project were of black swallowtail chrysalises. It is like black swallowtails never existed in Ohio until Europeans brought over their plants.

My son is a senior. Always figured if I had to contact a teacher about questionable teachings, it would have something to do with history or politics. Now 3+ years in, the time has come but it is a unexpected subject.
This is heartbreaking to me. Devastating to think that these young minds are filled with inaccurate, harmful infirmation...infornation that they will pass on to others...and that he will pass on year after year.

Please keep us posted.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2017, 03:39 PM   #10
Salamander
 
KC Clark's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2013
Location: Central Ohio
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Please keep us posted.
I'm finding out this is an uphill battle. Teacher just got recognized by the school board because he got the high school to be officially recognized as an "Ohio Wild School Site." I looked into how you earn this certification and found that the Ohio Division of Wildlife sets a pretty low bar.

http://wildlife.ohiodnr.gov/portals/...20brochure.pdf

So, plant a bunch of rose of sharon that Japanese beetles like to eat and you have created a benefit for wildlife.

"Pollinator gardens" are all the rage so planting anything with flowers that European honeybees like will suffice.
KC Clark is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bush, butterfly, careful, plant

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 07:14 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2