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Old 04-14-2018, 10:28 AM   #51
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As I've been told by a butterfly "expert," all plants are native to the earth so go ahead and plant anything anywhere. His butterfly expertise is breeding and selling painted lady caterpillars that he raises on artificial food. Unfortunately, more people are inclined to listen to him than me since he is going to give the answers they want to hear. And if this sounds familiar, it would not surprise me that I've mentioned it before.
Wow, that's bad advice. Has he never heard of Buckthorn, Garlic Mustard, Phragmites and the long list of non-native plants that reek havoc on the native plants and ecosystems?
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Old 04-14-2018, 10:33 AM   #52
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I share your frustration with the "ignore the peer-reviewed science, my casual thought is always more accurate" crowd. I'm currently dealing with a similar situation about honey bees using resources needed by native bees. I'll do a post on that later.
If I understand you right are you talking about the European Honey Bee, what most people think of when you say "Honey Bee", which I believe is a non-native bee to the U.S. and how it takes resources from the native bees which are very under recognized and little know about by the general public? And I might add not commercialized like the "Honey Bee".
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Old 04-14-2018, 02:24 PM   #53
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There is no honey bee that is native to the U.S. Honey bees are actually a rare exception in the bee world; of the many thousands of bee species there are only a very small number of species that store honey in large nests.

The frustrating part is that most honey bee beekeepers refuse to even acknowledge that their honey bees could harm native bees by taking the nectar and pollen resources needed by the native bees. Check out my recent bee post for more details.

Under recognized for sure - we have 400 native bee species right here in Wisconsin.
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Old 04-14-2018, 07:59 PM   #54
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As I've been told by a butterfly "expert," all plants are native to the earth so go ahead and plant anything anywhere. His butterfly expertise is breeding and selling painted lady caterpillars that he raises on artificial food. Unfortunately, more people are inclined to listen to him than me since he is going to give the answers they want to hear. And if this sounds familiar, it would not surprise me that I've mentioned it before.
(I wish I proofread my earlier post--although, I do blame the mistake on autocorrect on my phone.)

Yes...that ("all plants are native to the Earth") seemed to be the theme in that forum, too. I wish more people understood the complexity of ecosystems and co-evolution--and scientific research for that matter.

If you did post that before, it is worth stating it again.
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Old 04-14-2018, 08:01 PM   #55
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Weedy fields, I am so glad that you found out forum. Great comments...thanks for adding to the conversations.
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Old 05-07-2018, 03:34 PM   #56
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butterfly The Xerces Society on Tropical Milkweed

The Xerces Society has posted a nice summary of the adverse effects that tropical milkweed poses for monarchs.

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Tropical milkweed (Asclepias curassavica) is a non-native milkweed that has exploded in popularity in response to the demand for milkweed. It is simple to propagate, allowing growers to rapidly produce the plant for quick sale. The plant is also attractive, both to humans and monarchs, providing flowers and lush green foliage throughout the growing season – and that’s a problem.
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Tropical milkweed becomes a problem when planted in temperate areas where it does not die back in winter. A protozoan parasite of monarch butterflies (Ophryocystis elektroscirrha or OE for short) can travel with monarchs visiting the plants and become deposited on leaves. When caterpillars hatch and start eating the plant, they ingest the OE. High OE levels in adult monarchs have been linked to lower migration success in the eastern monarch population, as well as reductions in body mass, lifespan, mating success, and flight ability.
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When native milkweeds die back after blooming, the parasite dies along with them so that each summer’s monarch population feeds on fresh, parasite-free foliage. In contrast, tropical milkweed that remains evergreen through winter allows for OE levels to build up on the plant over time, meaning successive generations of monarch caterpillars feeding on the plant can be exposed to dangerous levels of OE.
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Tropical milkweed can also interfere with monarch migration and reproduction. When grown in northern areas, where it can grow later in the year than native species, the presence of tropical milkweed may confuse monarchs into breeding at a time when they should be migrating. In California, where this milkweed is widely planted, it can be growing near overwintering sites along the coast and may spur monarchs to breed when they should be overwintering.
https://xerces.org/2018/04/19/tropical-milkweed-a-no-grow/

They also posted some helpful resources at the end of the article.
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Old 05-21-2018, 02:36 PM   #57
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The Xerces Society has posted a nice summary of the adverse effects that tropical milkweed poses for monarchs.

https://xerces.org/2018/04/19/tropical-milkweed-a-no-grow/

They also posted some helpful resources at the end of the article.
Thanks for the info, NEWisc. I always have a hard time expressing why it is bad...especially in more northern regions. This will help me with my talking points.
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Old 05-22-2018, 02:49 PM   #58
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You're welcome. Glad to help.


It is difficult for me to understand why people insist on using tropical milkweeds when a much better alternative (native milkweeds) are so readily available. The well-being of monarch butterflies is certainly not their primary concern.
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Old 05-25-2018, 08:39 PM   #59
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You're welcome. Glad to help.


It is difficult for me to understand why people insist on using tropical milkweeds when a much better alternative (native milkweeds) are so readily available. The well-being of monarch butterflies is certainly not their primary concern.
I agree.

Well stated.
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Old 07-23-2018, 11:30 PM   #60
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butterfly

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As for Lincoln Brower, you will never see/hear him give a pro-tropical presentation. He is the #1 guy raising red flags about bringing tropical into the USA.
Sad to report that Lincoln has died. He was Da Man when it came to monarchs and unlike the other top monarch folks, he did not shy away from saying what he really thought of tropical milkweed. He will be greatly missed.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/obituaries/lincoln-p-brower-scientist-and-protector-of-the-monarch-butterfly-dies-at-86/2018/07/21/aedcbdd8-8cf8-11e8-85ae-511bc1146b0b_story.html

https://monarchjointventure.org/news...rvation-leader
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asclepias, asclepias curassavica, blood flower, blood-flower, bloodflower, curassavica, mexican butterfly weed, milk weed, non-native, plants, scarlet milkweed, silkweed, tropical milkweed

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