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Old 02-26-2009, 07:20 PM   #1
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Default Euonymus alata (Burning Bush)

Euonymus alata (Burning Bush)

UConn efforts help curb spread of invasive plants in state
by Elizabeth Omara-Otunnu - February 23, 2009

http://www.advance.uconn.edu/2009/090223/09022311.htm
excerpts from above.
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You see them in the parking lots of retail chain stores and fast food outlets neat shrubs with glowing scarlet leaves in fall and bright crimson berries in winter.

Burning bush is beautiful but, as many people now know, its one of a growing number of invasive plant species that are threatening indigenous ecological systems.
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The problem is that birds love the fruits, which are high in energy and fats. They fly off and spread the seeds, and now the plant is growing in numerous unmanaged habitats.
This article nicely states the issues associated with this popular species.
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Old 04-26-2009, 08:45 AM   #2
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Default adding some photos for identification

to assist in identifying the dreaded "burning bush"...
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Euonymus alata (Burning Bush)-280537787_e80fa7f493.jpg   Euonymus alata (Burning Bush)-280537792_1c594a7b9e.jpg   Euonymus alata (Burning Bush)-280539777_d67e9c011c.jpg   Euonymus alata (Burning Bush)-280537798_79251c4d51.jpg   Euonymus alata (Burning Bush)-dscn6333.jpg  

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Old 04-26-2009, 08:52 AM   #3
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Great photo of the bark. I will try to take some photos of the wings on the bark. That is another help to identify Burning Bush cropping up in natural areas.
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Old 04-26-2009, 11:28 AM   #4
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The Euonymus alata is my new top enemy plant. My neighbor to the right has a whole row of them leaning over the fence so now I have it too.
(I've been spending all my time lately leaning over the fence on one side of the yard or the other pulling and cutting invasives. Euonymus on one side, ivy, privet, euonymus, bridal wreath spirea, rose of sharon and bindweed to name a few on the other.)


In the first photo you can see the lovely red color (that's a quick early identifier for me) at the base of the leaves that appears in early spring when the leaves are small.
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Euonymus alata (Burning Bush)-img_5482_2.jpg   Euonymus alata (Burning Bush)-img_5483.jpg  
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Old 04-26-2009, 11:31 AM   #5
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Euonymus alatus is common here in Pennsylvania - these seedlings are growing in woods.

Red twigs and new spring foliage
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Old 04-26-2009, 12:28 PM   #6
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wanted to add this

distinguishing the native from the nasty:
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Eastern Wahoo can be distinguished from other erect Euonymus spp. by the following combination of characteristics: 1) its leaves have petioles exceeding " in length, 2) the leaves are finely pubescent on the underside, rather than hairless, 3) the bark of some branches is green with tan or gray vertical stripes, 4) the outer sides of the seed capsules are smooth, rather bumpy or warty, and 5) the flowers have 4 reddish purple petals. With respect to the last characteristic, other Euonymus spp. in Illinois have flowers with 5 petals, or their petals are white, green, or yellow.
source: Eastern Wahoo (Euonymus atropurpureus)
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Old 04-26-2009, 01:43 PM   #7
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I just caught your signature. You are juglone tolerant. How cute is that. Nice photos everyone.
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Old 05-15-2009, 09:30 AM   #8
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Hi guys! I think I've peeved a gardening friend by informing her that it is illegal for her to be giving away burning bush seedlings. She is an avid protector of wildlife, so I think she would be receptive to reading some information on how burning bush specifically harms wildlife. Can you point me towards any such information? thanks!
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Old 05-15-2009, 10:22 AM   #9
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birds do relish the seeds - a large part of the problem with it's spread.
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information on how burning bush specifically harms wildlife.
I think it's indirectly - the plant itself doesn't harm them, but the fact that they can so easily take over and crowd out the natives. Which throws off the sacred balance of things.

PLANTS Profile for Euonymus alatus (burningbush) | USDA PLANTS

from usda link:
Quote:
Massachusetts:
winged euonymus, burning bush - Prohibited
there are several other links found on this page:
winged burning bush: Euonymus alatus (Celastrales: Celastraceae)
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Old 05-15-2009, 10:39 AM   #10
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Thank you Bubble.

I'm hoping for some information in an easy format that a layman can easily grok, if anyone knows of such a thing.
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