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Old 08-31-2010, 11:25 AM   #1
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Default 10 Invasive Species That Cost the U.S. a Bundle

10 Invasive Species That Cost the U.S. a Bundle
By Bruce Watson
Posted 7:00 AM 08/25/10

10 Invasive Species That Cost the U.S. a Bundle - DailyFinance
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Anyone who has ever watched an episode of Animal Planet knows that ecosystems are fragile, relying on the delicate balance of species and resources. But what is less-known is the high economic cost when that balance is upset by animals that are alien to an area.

Some animals and insects -- including killer bees, Asian carp and Asian mongooses -- are introduced by humans to correct an imbalance, but end up posing an unforeseen threat to other species. In some cases, species that were once endangered grow out of control due to the efforts of concerned scientists and environmentalists to protect them. Caught between the danger of doing too much or too little, only one thing is certain: when it comes to the environment, each option carries a high price.

Here are 10 animals that, for one reason or another, have overpopulated their environment, threatening other species, resources and, ultimately, themselves...
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Old 08-31-2010, 06:23 PM   #2
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thumbs down Misguided attack on the coyote

The article quoted is from a money interest publication (Daily Finance) slanted toward the desires of the fat cats. A quote:

"Unlike most invasive species, coyotes are native to North America, with a natural habitat that extends from Alaska to Central America over terrain ranging from mountains to plains to -- these days -- cities (in one notable case, a coyote even staked out a Chicago Quiznos).

But the wily canines are an expensive nuisance: the major predators of cows, sheep and other livestock, they also prey on household pets in many suburban areas. A 2004 survey by the National Agricultural Statistics Service (summarized in this livestock report) found that coyotes were responsible for killing an estimated 135,600 sheep and lambs worth $10.7 million. The extensive cost to agriculture has led government officials to spend millions every year poisoning, trapping and shooting an estimated 90,000 coyotes."

I can't imagine a more misguided and manipulative message. Defending the problems - ranchers and folks with roaming house cats and dogs, it sees as a solution the increased persecution of the coyote, and it appeals to the slanted interests of the pet owners who, for the love of the freedom of their little "Mittens" or adventurous family dog, cannot think objectively on the matter.

Of course, this is to be expected when the green ecological movement actually makes a small bit of progress. The negatively affected previous status quo consisting of irresponsible pet owners who allow their cats to wreak daily destruction and ranchers who have eradicated native plants from land and set free invasive animals in a quest to get rich, can certainly be expected to rally back with arguments favoring their own behavior. They do it at any price, including advancing mistruth, and we are all familiar with the extent those can go to (think tobacco).
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Old 08-31-2010, 08:24 PM   #3
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Consider the source, "Bruce Watson is a features writer for DailyFinance, focusing on the political and cultural effects of economic events. A contributor to Military Lessons of the Persian Gulf War, A Chronology of the Cold War at Sea, the Journal of American Philosophy, A Cafe in Space, and the forthcoming Peanut Butter, Gooseberries, and Latkes!" Odd how such an esteemed contributor to such blogs as Cafe in Space and the up and coming Peanut Butter, Gooseberries, and Latkes missed including dogs and cats. Hmmm.... missing those was a tremendous oversight or.... maybe he just sorta left em out intentionally??? Side note.... Poisoning any animal is barbaric. Doesn't matter who's doing it or for what reason.
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Old 09-03-2010, 11:47 AM   #4
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I get called to rescue birds all the time. I am a 'transporter'--I simply capture the bird and take it to a rehab facility an hour away. This rehab facility no longer takes Canada geese since they are now considered invasive. I have had to explain to many individuals that I was not coming out for the goose with the broken wing because I'd be driving it to a rehabber an hour away who will euthanize it...even if the bird can be successfully rehabbed.
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Old 09-03-2010, 01:52 PM   #5
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In that case, do people have roast goose for dinner? (mostly kidding)

They won't rescue raccoon, either. If they come to pick up an injured raccoon they euthanize it. Poor thing.

Coyotes are getting a tad out of hand. They have been seen wandering through the streets of Carrboro and Chapel Hill in recent times, not skittish of humans at all, and people are worrying about their small children and not just their pets. I don't know what the solution is. We need a predator around to control the deer population, which is incredibly out of hand (I read that deer kill more people in the USevery year than any other animal, by causing car accidents), but there needs to be public education about the animals and a plan in place of what to do about problem animals that establish hunting terrietories withing towns.
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Old 09-03-2010, 01:58 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turttle View Post
In that case, do people have roast goose for dinner? (mostly kidding)

They won't rescue raccoon, either. If they come to pick up an injured raccoon they euthanize it. Poor thing.

Coyotes are getting a tad out of hand. They have been seen wandering through the streets of Carrboro and Chapel Hill in recent times, not skittish of humans at all, and people are worrying about their small children and not just their pets. I don't know what the solution is. We need a predator around to control the deer population, which is incredibly out of hand (I read that deer kill more people in the USevery year than any other animal, by causing car accidents), but there needs to be public education about the animals and a plan in place of what to do about problem animals that establish hunting terrietories withing towns.
What about the red wolves? Aren't they predators of the deer???
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Old 09-03-2010, 11:21 PM   #7
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Turttle: They rescue raccoons around here. Where is Carrboro and Chapel Hill? Not familiar with those town names...We have coyotes here in south Jersey. They don't seem to be eating any pets and aren't a problem. On occasion we'll see one run through the yard.

The deer population is out of hand because we have taken away their habitat! That's the bottom line. We've fragmented what little bit of land that is left for the animals. It's no wonder that they are constantly being killed by our cars!
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Old 09-03-2010, 11:50 PM   #8
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The problem with the deer population is more a loss of higher order predators than habitat loss. All we have left to keep their numbers in check are cars, hunters, and DNR sharp shooters.
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Old 09-10-2010, 10:10 AM   #9
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Default To Hunt or Not to Hunt

To Hunt or Not to Hunt
The controversial costs of managing the deer population.
By Debra Siepmann
September 2, 2010

To Hunt or Not to Hunt - Brookfield, CT Patch
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Brookfield has joined the ranks of other states around the country and like-minded Connecticut communities that cull the over-populated deer herds by means of professional bow hunters. Wednesday night, members of the Brookfield Conversation Commission voted against hunting deer on the Erickson Farm property, located near Huckleberry Hill Elementary School (HHES), but gave their approval to allow hunters access from private property to abutting town open space on Isabels Way.

Accidents involving deer result in millions of dollars in damage to vehicles each year and tick-borne illnesses such as Lyme disease among humans and pets can cause life-long complications.

In the early 1900s the deer population in the United States was thought to be approximately 500,000, today that number is around 27 million. Herds were once kept in control by natural predators such as wolves and mountain lions, though many of those predators have rightly become scarce in heavily populated areas...
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Old 09-10-2010, 10:18 AM   #10
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The most invasive species on this planet is homo sapiens sapiens.

As the former foster parent of a coyote pup, I can testify that coyotes would not mind replacing cats and dogs as man's "best friend". They would not mind riding the wave of invasion at all.
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