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Old 12-31-2008, 08:14 PM   #21
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Actually...EHOSP and Starlings are becoming scarce in Europe. I totally think it's a deal!

Actually, if I turn over an animal for re-hab, I don't want it used for food for another animal. If it can't be saved, I want it euthed. Even if it is an EHOSP. I just can't work up the hate. They're animals, and they're doing what they must do to survive.

Last edited by Prairiefreak; 12-31-2008 at 08:16 PM. Reason: Row, Row, Row your boat....
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Old 01-01-2009, 01:44 AM   #22
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I got a little lesson about EHOSP behavior, and perhaps invasive animals generally, when I was in Kenya a few years back. A stunningly gorgeous native African bird (mostly turqouise blue, have no idea what species) was taking a bath in a rainwater puddle in front of my host's house. An EHOSO flew up and landed a foot away, so the blue bird moved back and continued its bath. The EHOSP moved in again, the blue bird moved back. This went through several cycles and the blue bird finally gave up and left. The EHOSP never attacked or made aggressive moves, it just kept getting inside the other bird's space until it felt compelled to leave. It was actually a fairly clever, low-energy, low-risk tactic to merely get in the face of its neighbor until the neighor couldn't take it anymore.

A day later I noticed an EHOSP (maybe the same one?) going into the wooden box on the porch that enclosed the electric meter so I put my mosquito headnet over the hole it had gone in through. Sensing my presence, it immediately flew back out -- right into the net. I called to Monica, the 11 year-old housegirl (no child labor laws there!) and she carefully removed the sparrow from the net and took it in the house. I couldn't ask her what she was going to do with it as she only spoke Swahili, but her business-like attitude in taking it made me think she was headed straight for the charcoal stove with it.........
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Old 01-01-2009, 01:58 AM   #23
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Their culture places a great value on their native African fauna. We North Americans are just now beginning to foster those very same values.

This is a really great site for those interested in learning more about European house sparrows and the toll they take on our native cavity nesters such as bluebirds, screech owls, wood ducks, and purple martins-
www.sialis.org
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Old 01-02-2009, 12:40 AM   #24
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Starling in fall non-breeding plumage

Got Starling?-p1100772ed.jpg
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Old 01-02-2009, 09:21 AM   #25
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Quote:
I propose we set up a invasive fauna exchange with our buddies in Europe.
Don't we wish.

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Actually, if I turn over an animal for re-hab, I don't want it used for food for another animal. If it can't be saved, I want it euthed. Even if it is an EHOSP.
I can respect and appreciate that. My experiences with rehabbers have been very positive. I don't think they're a "don't ask, don't tell" group. My bet is either they wouldn't accept them or they'd be upfront with how they would use them. Raptor rehabbers are particularly dependent upon donations from the public and they're definitely upfront about how they would use what was brought to them.

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I just can't work up the hate. They're animals, and they're doing what they must do to survive.
Has nothing to do with hate for me but I do totally understand why there are those who hate these birds, especially blue birders and purple martin landlords. It's very difficult separating emotion from logic when they're looking at the blue bird nest boxes that they lovingly provided and monitored with dead hatchlings that have had their eyes pecked out strewn all over on the ground beneath the nestbox. Thanks to the drop in prices and ready availability of the nest box video cams to the backyard birder, what happens is no longer left to speculation. It's very shocking to see with your own eyes and many are left numb. I was.

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Starling in fall non-breeding plumage
That's a really great photo. I'm beginning to spot your photos because they are so incredibly good. I'm slow but I think I'm getting it. You have got to be the same Sage as the one who has this photo of the baby squirrels at the top of this page http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...splay.php?f=86 Am I right! You are really good. You're versatile too. You not only take excellent photos of natives but you take great photos of invasives too.
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Old 01-02-2009, 04:55 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TheLorax View Post
That's a really great photo. I'm beginning to spot your photos because they are so incredibly good. I'm slow but I think I'm getting it. You have got to be the same Sage as the one who has this photo of the baby squirrels at the top of this page http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...splay.php?f=86 Am I right! You are really good. You're versatile too. You not only take excellent photos of natives but you take great photos of invasives too.
Thanks for the compliment and yes, the squirrel pic is mine and also the Red-tailed Hawk devouring a rat heading this page:
http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...splay.php?f=18 They were discovered on Flickr and their use requested by another member for this site before it went live. That's how I got here! I'm trying to start threads for members to contribute photos that will be appropriate for the subject matter. And now I have to learn which local plants are invasive and which are native!

Happy New Year!
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Old 01-02-2009, 08:08 PM   #27
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There are plenty of bluebird trail-ers who HATE the EHOSP. And I mean white hot HATE. It's virulent, psychopathic hatred. Anthropomorphism to the max X 10! I just cain't get that worked up about bluebirds. They're nice. They're little. blue. birds. My opinion is that if we restored more native habitats, there would be less food and shelter for the EHOSP and Starlings, and the problem might begin to take care of itself. The main places I see EHOSP and Starlings is in the urban and suburban areas...if I visit friends out in the country, I don't see many if any at all. They're birds that live on our detritus, and in the habitats we've made inhospitable to any other forms of bird life. Encourage your local Sharp-shinned and Cooper's hawks. I've got a little sharpie around here who is just an eating machine vis a vis EHOSP and starlings.

It's kinda like people who complain about pigeons. Pigeons exist because people are slobs...if people were neater, and secured their garbage...they'd have no food source. Same with Norway rats, too.

I signed up for a bluebird trail once, until I was told it entailed ripping the heads off of baby EHOSP or Starlings, or grinding them underfoot. Can't go there. Congrats to those who can! I'm not gonna kill a baby EHOSP just like I'm not gonna be eating any lamb, or veal.
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Old 01-02-2009, 08:20 PM   #28
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Bird whisperer...could it have been a superb starling? I used to have one as a pet. He sang like a robin. I built him a large flight cage.

google superb starling, then click on images. PF.

Last edited by Prairiefreak; 01-02-2009 at 08:24 PM. Reason: Hi!
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Old 01-02-2009, 10:46 PM   #29
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I can see how they could get worked up. Everyone has buttons that get pushed and bluebirders are no different than anyone else from that respect.

I'm a proponent of both passive and active house sparrow control. I have no problems hard boiling their eggs and putting them back in a nest for them to try to hatch but I wouldn't be able to practice active control. I do have the utmost respect for those who do practice active control providing they humanely destroy the bird. Most of the people I know are sickened by having to humanely destroy them but they do it in an attempt to protect native cavity nesters. If not for the collective actions of bluebirders practicing active sparrow and starling contol, I am convinced that species would be on the brink. Same thing for purple martins. Those video cams really heightened public awareness.
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Old 01-02-2009, 11:16 PM   #30
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What you do is you go to the nest boxes every week. Take out, and throw away the non-native's eggs. Which eliminates the need to rip off baby bird heads.

I'm sorry to say it...but some of those blue-birders were bat-sh*t crazy. I'm not a fan of bat-sh*t crazy.... their feelings were not coming from a scientific place, IOW.
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