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Old 06-03-2009, 09:46 PM   #1
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Default Beware of pythons

Beware of pythons
Government should invest now in eradication efforts
Published: Saturday, May 30, 2009 at 1:00 a.m.
Last Modified: Friday, May 29, 2009 at 5:20 p.m.

Beware of pythons | HeraldTribune.com | Sarasota Florida | Southwest Florida's Information Leader
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Florida and its counties spent millions of dollars to eradicate the Brazilian pepper tree after it spread through the state -- even though this invasive species doesn't eating birds, wildlife ranging from rabbits to alligators, or cats and dogs.

Burmese pythons can and do consume animals -- small and large, domestic and wild -- in large quantities. Python populations also multiply like rabbits, or faster, and can quickly expand their range.
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Pythons, in particular, can ravage native bird and wildlife populations. The impact on ecosystems is reason enough to invest in preventive efforts to contain the python.

But, as Lowman warns, an exponential surge in the number of pythons and the expansion of their range also pose risks to state and local parks, which attract tourists and visitors. We agree with her that park attendance could quickly be diminished if python sightings become routine.
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Old 08-31-2009, 01:07 PM   #2
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snake FL- Land of the reptiles

Land of the reptiles
Florida needs protection from pythons and other invasive species
Published: Monday, August 10, 2009 at 1:00 a.m.
Last Modified: Friday, August 7, 2009 at 5:40 p.m.

http://www.heraldtribune.com/article...f-the-reptiles
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Tourists and other money-spending travelers are welcome in Florida -- especially now, during this debilitating economic recession.

But some visitors -- such as Burmese pythons, iguanas and Nile monitors -- need to be stopped at the border.

Unlike snowbirds, who contribute to our state and local economies in the winter and return to their roosts up North, exotic reptiles stay here -- and multiply.

Invasive species harm the environment, native wildlife and, in some cases, people. They offer no economic benefit, except to a few importers, sellers and zoo keepers.

A ban on importing pythons, as proposed in federal legislation, is warranted. Sponsored by two Florida Democrats -- Sen. Bill Nelson and Rep. Kendrick Meek -- S 373 and HR 2811 would add pythons to the list of "injurious species" prohibited from being imported into the United States.
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Old 01-29-2010, 08:46 PM   #3
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Default Florida python hunts to be a year-round effort

Florida python hunts to be a year-round effort
December 4, 2009 | 4:22 pm

Florida python hunts to be a year-round effort | Outposts | Los Angeles Times
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Florida wildlife officials have announced that the state-sanctioned hunting of Burmese pythons will be resumed in January and will be a year-round effort.

The four-month pilot hunting program ended in October, with 39 of the invasive species captured.

Snake owners who released pythons when they became too large to manage are believed largely responsible for this troubling phenomenon...
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Old 01-29-2010, 08:47 PM   #4
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Default FWC announces continuation of python permit program

FWC announces continuation of python permit program
December 2, 2009
Contact: Patricia Behnke, 850-251-2130

http://myfwc.com/NEWSROOM/09/statewide/News_09_X_Python7.htm
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The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission (FWC) will issue permits for capturing reptiles of concern on state-managed lands in South Florida, beginning January 2010. These permits will expire Dec. 31, 2010. Applications are available at MyFWC.com; click on "Burmese pythons" from the "Quick Clicks" menu. Only qualified applicants will be issued the permits.
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The permit period beginning Jan. 1 requires potential permit holders to be Florida residents and to have a reptile of concern permit, digital camera and a GPS unit. They also must have experience in capturing wild snakes, handling large constrictors, euthanizing reptiles and working in remote areas.

The permit holders are required to photograph and mark GPS locations, photograph and describe stomach contents of euthanized snakes, file reports with the FWC within 36 hours of capture, and euthanize pythons onsite or transport live pythons to be euthanized at a location with veterinary facilities. Permit holders will be required to make at least five trips each calendar quarter. They also must visit each WMA at least twice during the year.
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Old 01-29-2010, 08:48 PM   #5
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Default

SPECIAL PERMIT APPLICATION
REMOVAL OF NONNATIVE REPTILES ON STATE LANDS
FLORIDA FISH AND WILDLIFE CONSERVATION COMMISSION
http://myfwc.com/docs/LicensesPermits/python_permit_application.pdf
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Old 03-26-2010, 02:56 PM   #6
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Default Killing Pythons, and Regulating Them

Killing Pythons, and Regulating Them
March 5, 2010, 7:37 pm
By THE EDITORS

Killing Pythons, and Regulating Them - Room for Debate Blog - NYTimes.com
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Florida officials are stepping up efforts to deal with the python population in the Everglades, measures that include a special hunting season that begins on state lands on Monday. But wildlife officials say that the big snakes, which prey on a number of threatened and endangered species from wading birds to wood rats, have reproduced faster than hunters can kill them.

Ken Salazar, the Interior secretary, recently announced efforts to ban the import or interstate transport of nine non-native snakes: four types of pythons, including the Burmese python, as well as boa constrictors and four kinds of anacondas.

What should be done to control the pythons’ spread, both in Everglades National Park and other Florida wild areas? What is the most effective way to kill them?
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Old 03-26-2010, 03:03 PM   #7
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Default First, They Came for the Pythons . . .

First, They Came for the Pythons . . .
By Robert Stacy McCain on 2.1.09 @ 6:53PM

The American Spectator : AmSpecBlog : First, They Came for the Pythons . . .
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UPDATE: Just got off the phone with Andrew Wyatt, president of the U.S. Association of Reptile Keepers, who says that the H.R. 669 ban isn't just about snakes, but will also affect other species of exotic pets.

"There's all kinds of animals involved in it," said Wyatt. "It's an attempt to ban almost every animal that's not native to the United States."

Wyatt certainly can't be accused of being "anti-environment." A lifetime outdoorsman, he runs Outer Banks Wild, an eco-tourism and education enterprise based in North Carolina's Outer Banks. "I love my environment -- I live in the outdoors," Wyatt says.
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Old 04-09-2010, 10:45 PM   #8
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Default Special task force has python control plan

Special task force has python control plan
Monday, March 29, 2010 5:23 PM EST
By Lindsay Kruger

Special task force has python control plan - NBC-2.com WBBH News for Fort Myers, Cape Coral & Naples, Florida
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So far this year, more pythons have been caught in Collier County than in all of 2009. The invasive snake is reproducing faster than it is being killed and state wildlife and conservation agencies say something needs to be done about it.
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The Invasive Species Task Force held their first meeting last week where the group outlined plans for an educational campaign geared toward the public as well as plans to create a python 911 hotline.
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Old 04-09-2010, 10:53 PM   #9
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Default Proposed Python Ban (S373)

Proposed Python Ban (S373)
ReptileChannel.com
PIJAC expects long battle over proposed python ban S373.

Proposed Python Ban (S373)
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The Pet Industry Joint Advisory Council (PIJAC) urged members to respond, but remain “calm” and “professional,” to recent Federal legislation that would ban the importation and interstate commerce of the entire Python genera.
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PIJAC estimates that millions of pythons from nearly one dozen species have been imported into the United States over the past 50 years, and only the Burmese python has established a feral population. Moreover, PIJAC contends that several factors combined to help establish that population, including a “mass” escape of pythons from holding facilities destroyed during Hurricane Andrew in 1992, additional but isolated escapes from pet owners and commercial facilities; misguided release by pet owners; the subtropical climate and large area of swampy habitat with relatively little human activity, and ample prey availability in the Everglades region.
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anaconda, beware, boa constrictor, burmese python, everglades, fish and wildlife conservation, florida, invasive reptiles, invasive snakes, invasive species, managed lands, non native snakes, non native species, nonnative reptiles, python, python hunts, python permit program, pythons, snake, snakes, wildlife officials

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