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Old 08-09-2012, 11:54 AM   #1
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Default Emerald ash borer found in Conn. for first time

Emerald ash borer found in Conn. for first time
Updated: Friday, 20 Jul 2012, 11:32 AM EDT
Published : Friday, 20 Jul 2012, 11:32 AM EDT

Emerald ash borer found in Conn. for first time | WTNH.com Connecticut
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The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station and the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection said Friday that the emerald ash borer was found in Prospect on Monday by experiment station staff members. The U.S. Department of Agriculture confirmed...
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Old 08-10-2012, 08:04 PM   #2
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Depressing news, but I guess it is best to be informed.
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Old 08-13-2012, 01:45 PM   #3
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The landscapers around me are making a killing "treating" Ash for EAB. Not a month goes by that I don't have some sort of an advertising flyer attached to my mailbox offering to "save" my Ash. It's a borer.... people aren't making the connection that this isn't a 1 shot treatment deal and mum seems to be the word on the pesticides being used to save "specimen" trees. You start paying to treat the tree and you can't stop.... the minute you stop shelling out $$$ for treatment..... the EAB moves in. It'd be much better planting a replacement native right smack dab next to any Ash trees we've got. The minute I found out this was a borer.... I knew it was over and started "buddy" planting some of my more mature Ash trees. If only others would start doing the same. We're going to lose our Ash just like we lost our American Elms and our American Chestnuts.... it's only a matter of time. There's no staving off the inevitable no matter how much $$$ we throw at this invasive borer.
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Old 02-26-2013, 09:42 AM   #4
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AFAIK, the jury is still out on what is going to happen to ash trees in the long run. With the EAB dependent on one genus and basically wiping that genus out as it moves along, it will be tough for it to double back when it reaches the end of the ash's range. If anyone can point me to research that paints a more grim picture, please LMK. I have access to scientific journals so don't feel you need to stick to stuff available online.

I have more ash trees than any other tree. EAB hit me hard last year. I picked 2 trees to save and the rest have to come down.
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Old 02-26-2013, 03:01 PM   #5
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This is just my take and…. I’m not saying I’m right and that everyone who thinks differently than me is wrong… it’s just my take is all. My concerns are more geared toward the pesticides being used indiscriminately by millions of homeowners trying to “save” their ash trees and the tens of thousands of certified arborists and landscape contractors out there jumping on the “save-your-ash-and hence-your-property-values” bandwagon who are preying on our emotions and….. “treating” with some incredibly toxic pesticides that aren’t exactly target specific. Those chemicals are leaching into our water supplies whether we like to think about it or not therefore…. aegrescit medendo IMO. Many of our wastewater treatment plants are a century old….. some older….. they weren’t engineered to deal with pharmaceuticals or petrochemicals and certainly not pesticides and the bad news for us is updating our wastewater treatment plants isn’t exactly on the radar of any of our politicians….spending $$$ on updating our plants would mean they’d have less $$$ to spend on “pet” projects and besides which…. updating em wouldn’t be “cost effective”…. as if fluoridating our water is>>>? Whatever…. it’s a can that’s gonna continue getting kicked down the road. Anyone can look up the known “limitations” of our current wastewater treatment plants online if they’re interested…. what they’ll find is that our treatment plants aren’t capable of stopping the bioaccumulation of toxins in our environment…. to me…. that’s not good…. not good at all. As far as research into remediation…. not much going on in that arena for the benefit of public health…. I’ve learned…. safe drinking water for humans isn’t exactly the average politician’s top priority.
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I’d like to believe with all my heart that EAB won’t jump hosts and won’t double back like so many are implying but…. unfortunately…. I saw something with my own eyes over in China. EAB jumped from Fraxinus spp. to Juglans spp. and I was told it had jumped to Ulmus spp. too. If it’s already jumping like that in China….. my sinking heart tells me it’s capable of “adapting” and jumping like that right here in the US. Lord knows we’ve got a decent supply of native Ulmus spp. that didn’t succumb to DED and a decent supply of native Juglans that hasn’t yet succumbed to Thousand Cankers Disease (TCD) on this continent for EAB to jump to. Are we allocating research $$$ to “host jumping”>>>? I don’t keep up on EAB but…. my little voice tells me…. there probably isn’t much research going on into “host jumping”….. where’s the $$$ to be made off that kind of research by our “partners” and “stakeholders”? There’s for sure $$$ to be made off researching new “silver bullet” pesticides that so many of us have been conditioned to put our faith into instead of “elbow grease” so…. my bet is…. we’ve freed up just enough research $$$ to make it appear we really care about our native ash trees and the many species dependent upon them for survival while using the brunt of what’s out there for research into highly profitable kill-alls. I really hate being cynical so I’ll just cross my fingers and toes that your little voice is right on this and…. the “jury is still out” crowd isn’t being strung along with unrealistic hopes for the future of their Ash trees if they just pick a few to “treat” while waiting out the storm.

adding something…. I totally blew it going on only what I’d seen Agrilus planipennis destroying in China without yahooing…. evidently there’s more potential alternate host species out there for EAB than just the Juglans spp. I saw and Ulmus spp I heard about….. looks like Pterocarya spp. and Ligustrum spp. are too, http://www.emeraldashborer.info/files/hostrangedeb.pdf, “Currently, emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is known to infest only ash (Fraxinus sp.) trees. Reports from Asia, however, indicate that this or a closely related beetle, have been collected from Asian species of elm, walnut and Pterocarya sp. (wingnut). The ability of emerald ash borer to utilize alternative hosts would obviously have major implications for survey activities the overall success of the eradication effort. In addition, we have observed that North American ash species may differ in their susceptibility to emerald ash borer or in their vulnerability once infested. Green ash (F. pennsylvanica) trees, for example, appear to decline more rapidly than white ash (F. americana) trees, even when trees are growing in the same area and subject to similar infestation pressure….Preliminary results of our host range work suggest that under no-choice conditions, female beetles will oviposite on alternate species. Ovipositional “mistakes” do occur in the field, but appear to be rare. First stage larvae fed readily on all three ash species. A few larvae attempted to feed on the alternate species, but development appeared to be impaired. Privet, however, did appear to be suitable for first stage larvae in the lab test. Privet and other species related to ash warrant additional evaluation.” Considering how “popular” privet was and how invasive it’s become because of its past popularity….. that makes me VERY uncomfortable. I may be totally wrong but…. that little voice inside me that’s an eternal optimist is telling me I need to stick to my original game plan. I’m gonna continue buddy planting natives by my ash trees. Any ash trees I’ve got that succumb to EAB won’t be treated and won’t be removed other than 1 Green Ash I’ve got that’s just too close to our house…. prevailing winds are from the northwest and if that tree was allowed to stand for anything longer than a coupla years after it died…. it’d end up crashing into our family room. That 1 I’ll have to remove. I can cut it down to manageable lengths that can be dragged off into the woods where the decomposers can have at it. Any ash seedlings…. will be left with the hopes that some day…. we’ll discover a stand with native DNA that has a resistance to EAB. It’s possible…. any ash surviving this onslaught could then be traditionally bred for resistance to EAB. I guess what I’m saying is that I doubt seriously if any real hope we have to right this wrong will lie with some silver bullet EAB kills-all they’ll market to us as new and improved.
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Last edited by Equilibrium; 02-26-2013 at 03:16 PM. Reason: adding something
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Old 02-26-2013, 07:24 PM   #6
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Ohio has thrown up its hands on the EAB. Wasn't enough $ to stop it and now I believe it has been found in all 88 counties.

The Asian longhorned beetle is where the big $ is going now. The government is really trying to stop it in the one county where it has been found. The beetle is a big deal because it goes after 13 genus of trees, including ash.

Ohio Department of Agriculture | Asian Longhorned Beetle
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Old 02-26-2013, 07:32 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Equilibrium View Post
My concerns are more geared toward the pesticides being used indiscriminately by millions of homeowners trying to “save” their ash trees and the tens of thousands of certified arborists and landscape contractors out there jumping on the “save-your-ash-and hence-your-property-values” bandwagon who are preying on our emotions and….. “treating” with some incredibly toxic pesticides that aren’t exactly target specific. Those chemicals are leaching into our water supplies whether we like to think about it or not
I won't argue about where the chemicals are going but I'm guessing fewer people are trying to save their ash trees than you think. People get sticker shock when they figure out how much it costs to treat the trees. I knew what I was getting into because I had to treat the birch trees at my last house for birch miners.
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Old 03-01-2013, 08:33 PM   #8
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ALB is another "gift" from China. It made its way to Illinois. Allegedly, we nipped it in the bud. Time will tell.
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The professionals must be making $$$ off of treating otherwise there wouldn't be so many advertisements and flyers. I just don't see them spending that kinda money unless they were getting something out of it. I do think too many ash are being treated... at least around me that's what's going on. Whole towns began allocating funds to treat all ash on right of ways and in public parks so as not to destroy the ambience of their communities. The other thing is that sticker shock you mentioned after people get a quote and all the long term service contracts. Some people decide to go it on their own to save money and that's usually worse for all of us than if they'd hired a professional because most of these people don't understand the lifecycle and aren't reading the labels. It's really a shame... I doubt seriously if the majority of folk treating on their own are applying properly let alone at the right time.
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Old 03-14-2013, 12:53 PM   #9
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Default Decoys could blunt spread of ash-killing beetles

Decoys could blunt spread of ash-killing beetles
Penn State
February 12, 2013

Decoys could blunt spread of ash-killing beetles | Penn State University
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As the emerald ash borer ravages North American ash trees, threatening the trees' very survival, a team of entomologists and engineers may have found a way to prevent the spread of the pests.

Emerald ash borers (EABs), a type of beetle native to Asia, first appeared in the U.S. about 20 years ago. They are now moving east from Michigan, killing ash trees on the Eastern Seaboard as far south as North Carolina.

"Within 25 years, practically no ash trees may...
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Old 10-15-2014, 10:15 PM   #10
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A professor in Dayton has figured out that EABs have decided that white fringetree AKA Chionanthus virginicus is also a good host. Ash and the fringetrees are both in the Oleaceae family.

Ash killer spreading to other trees | www.mydaytondailynews.com
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