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Old 11-20-2008, 02:56 PM   #1
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Default Welcome to the Invasive Fauna Board

This area of the site has been created for the polite and thoughtful discussion of exotic invasive fauna. It is our hope this board will become a great place for members to both give and receive help identifying, controlling, managing, and eradicating invasive and potentially invasive species of fauna. Please be polite, considerate, and respectful of practices and/or opinions that may differ from your own. Although it is perfectly acceptable to discuss relevant current events here, best to steer clear of political and/or religious discussions. There are many forums that encourage political and religious discussions. Wildlife Gardeners does not.
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Old 01-03-2010, 12:10 AM   #2
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Fact- Cats aren’t North American wildlife. They eat North American wildlife.

Take some time to read our policy on cats before posting to our boards- Adoption of The Wildlife Society's policy in regard to feral and free-ranging domestic cats

Advocating for the rights of invasive species undermines efforts to promote environmentally sound practices that preserve biodiversity. Wildlife Gardeners isn’t going to be strong armed into compromising its existing members by providing TNR advocates with a podium to debate the impact of cats on wildlife. TNR practices are in direct opposition to the preservation, restoration, and establishment of native flora and fauna.

Feral cats are a serious environmental issue not an animal welfare problem. Wildlife Gardeners believes “federal and state wildlife laws designed to protect endangered and threatened species conflict with the practice of releasing non-indigenous predators into the wild.” Specifically, TNR practices likely violate the Endangered Species Act, the Migratory Bird Treaty Act, and numerous state laws and codes.
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Old 01-04-2010, 10:10 PM   #3
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Default Critical Assessment of Claims Regarding Management of Feral Cats by Trap–Neuter–Return

Critical Assessment of Claims Regarding Management of Feral Cats by Trap–Neuter–Return
Travis Longcore, Catherine Rich, and Lauren M. Sullivan

http://cwhrbird.org/documents/Longcore2009.pdf
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Abstract: Many jurisdictions have adopted programs to manage feral cats by trap– neuter–return (TNR), in which cats are trapped and sterilized, then returned to the environment to be fed and cared for by volunteer caretakers. Most conservation biologists probably do not realize the extent and growth of this practice and that the goal of some leading TNR advocates is that cats ultimately be recognized and treated as “protected wildlife.” We compared the arguments put forth in support of TNR by many feral cat advocates with the scientific literature. Advocates promoting TNR often claim that feral cats harm wildlife only on islands and not on continents; fill a natural or realized niche; do not contribute to the decline of native species; and are insignificant vectors or reservoirs of disease. Advocates also frequently make claims about the effectiveness of TNR, including claims that colonies of feral cats are eventually eliminated by TNR and that managed colonies resist invasion by other cats. The scientific literature contradicts each of these claims. TNR of feral cats is primarily viewed and regulated as an animal welfare issue, but it should be seen as an environmental issue, and decisions to implement it should receive formal environmental assessment. Conservation scientists have a role to play by conducting additional research on the effects of feral cats on wildlife and by communicating sound scientific information about this problem to policy makers.
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Old 01-07-2010, 01:08 PM   #4
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Default Cats and Wildlife- A Conservation Dilemma

I would like to add a very important study-
Introduction

Cats and Wildlife
A Conservation Dilemma

By John S. Coleman, Stanley A. Temple and Scott R. Craven
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In summary
Free-ranging cats are abundant and widespread predators. They often exist at much higher densities than native predators. They prey on large numbers of wild animals, some of which are rare or endangered. They compete with native predators, and they harbor a variety of diseases. Yet, cats are popular pets. In order to have and care for our pets--and still protect our native wildlife--we must make an effort to limit in a humane manner the adverse effects free-ranging cats can have on wildlife.
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Old 01-07-2010, 01:16 PM   #5
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Default DNR Division of Fish and Wildlife- Minnesota's killer kitties

I would like to add another very important position statement-
Fish & Wildlife Today: Winter 1998: Minnesota's killer kitties: Minnesota DNR

DNR Division of Fish and Wildlife
Minnesota's killer kitties

Well fed and sell armed, free-ranging domestic cats kill millions of birds each year
Quote:
Is a fat cat a satisfied cat? Apparently not when it has birds nearby. According to a recent report by Wisconsin researchers, free-ranging domestic cats destroy millions of birds in that state each year.

Many of these tubby tabbies kill for fun rather than for food. Unlike wild predators, domestic cats hunt whether they are hungry or not. Professor Stan Temple of the University of Wisconsin (UW) calls cats "subsidized predators" because they receive a steady supply of food at home. "Pet cats can hunt longer and are less susceptible to disease than many wild predators," says Temple.
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Old 01-09-2010, 07:37 PM   #6
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It is by design we do not offer pet, feral, or free roaming animal advocacy forums at Wildlife Gardeners. Adding these forums would undermine our ability to stay focused and on topic. We need to encourage serious and interesting debate worth reading that is consistent with our Mission Statement for like-minded. We owe this to the members who registered to discuss the natural world and what we humans can do to become better environmental stewards.

As a site focused on the natural world, we need all guests to know our decision was not based on the valuing of one species over another. Our decision was based on the moral issue of minimizing suffering and the best science available. For each year a feral animal such as a horse or cat lives outdoors, many animals will suffer while valuable resources are depleted.

We will continue to provide an opportunity for feral and free roaming animal discussions in our invasive fauna forum. Discussions of them will be limited to control, management, and eradication of feral animal populations to preserve biodiversity. Discussions advocating for feral and free roaming animals either directly or indirectly will not be permitted, they are not only counterproductive but disruptive. To allow them would be disrespectful to our membership.

"The greatness of a nation and its moral progress can be judged by the way its animals are treated."
--Ghandi.
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Old 01-10-2010, 12:06 AM   #7
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Interesting and thought-provoking reading. A question for WG: What alternative does WG propose and support instead? Should feral cats just be captured and killed?
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Old 01-10-2010, 11:02 AM   #8
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Adoption of The Wildlife Society's policy in regard to feral and free-ranging domestic cats

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1 . Strongly support and encourage the humane elimination of feral cat colonies.
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Old 01-10-2010, 05:50 PM   #9
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Default American Veterinary Medical Association, AVMA policy

American Veterinary Medical Association, AVMA policy

Free-roaming Abandoned and Feral Cats
(Oversight: AWC & CEI; EB 11/2004; revised 11/05. 06/2009)

http://www.avma.org/issues/policy/animal_welfare/feral_cats.asp
excerpt from above:
Quote:
• Encouragement of State and Local Ordinances
The AVMA strongly supports reducing the number of unowned free-roaming abandoned and feral cats through humane capture (with placement in homes where appropriate) by local health departments, humane societies, and animal control agencies. All free-roaming abandoned and feral cats that are not in managed colonies should be removed from their environment and treated in the same manner as other abandoned and stray animals in accord with local and state ordinances. State and local agencies should adopt and enforce ordinances that:
o Prohibit the sale or adoption of intact cats by humane organizations and animal control agencies.
o Require licensing, rabies vaccination, and permanent animal identification through microchipping of all cats.
o Encourage that owned cats be kept indoors, in an outdoor enclosure, or on a leash. Cats in rural areas must be confined to the property.
o Prohibit public feeding of intact free-roaming abandoned and feral cats.
Prevent establishment of managed cat colonies in wildlife-sensitive ecosystems.
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Old 01-10-2010, 05:52 PM   #10
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Default New Study Shows Euthanasia is More Effective Than TNR In Free-Roaming Cat Management

New Study Shows Euthanasia is More Effective Than TNR In Free-Roaming Cat Management
By Pamela Jo Hatley, Esquire

http://www.pamelajohatley.com/Articles/JAVMA%20study%20report.pdf
Quote:
To set the parameters for the matrix population models used in their study, the researchers applied data from published studies of free-roaming cats in urban environments.5 Analyses of the matrix models showed that with application of TNR, the population growth rate of free roaming cats was still greater than 1 even when 75% of female cats in the population were spayed.6 On the other hand, application of euthanasia to only 50% of the cats in the population resulted in negative population growth.7 Moreover, application of euthanasia to 75% of the cats in the population would result in the population being halved every year.
Quote:
This does not mean trap-and-remove is not effective, however. As the study shows, trap-and remove is more effective than TNR as a method of population control of free-roaming cats. Hence, rather than waste taxpayers’ money on less effective TNR programs, local governments should provide their animal control agencies with the necessary policies and resources to do their jobs well. Instead of passive, applied-only-upon-complaint trap and remove, animal control agencies should be equipped to engage in proactive animal control to effect a positive reduction in the free-roaming cat population.
Quote:
In fact, were animal control agencies to publicly take a more proactive approach to trap-and remove, the resulting effect on cat population growth might exceed that indicated by the JAVMA report due to the extrinsic effects on people. For example, a proactive program of euthanasia might have a chilling effect on abandonment. Persons who would otherwise be inclined to abandon their unwanted cats rather than turn them over to shelters might be deterred from such activity if they knew their abandoned pet cat would likely be picked up as a stray and wind up at the pound anyway. Conversely, TNR has been shown to foster abandonment.
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