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Old 08-17-2011, 07:13 PM   #1
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Default A Few Dozen Bumblebees would be a Metropolis

Worcester Telegram & Gazette - telegram.com - Outdoors: Keeping bees safe and active clearly a crucial, fruitful endeavor

"They all make a little honey, but not enough to harvest. Unlike honeybees, they never form huge colonies. A few dozen bumblebees, for example, would be a metropolis. Their inestimable worth is in pollination."


"Scientists can’t pinpoint what’s killing them all, but they’ve found more than 120 pesticides in their hives. The poisons we spray on our lawns, gardens and farms can’t be good for them — or us. They may be affecting their thinking and ability to find their way back to their hives. They’ve also detected malnutrition. Our bees have far fewer native plants for a well-balanced diet today thanks to agricultural monocultures, useless grass lawns and the pathetic destruction or artificial manicuring of much of our former wild habitat. Poisons and malnutrition have apparently weakened bees’ immunities to a wide range of diseases, especially deadly viruses."
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Old 08-17-2011, 07:58 PM   #2
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That makes me more determined than ever to create a fully functioning, all native haven for them (and others) on our 2 acres.

(As mentioned before, I'm not counting my vegetable garden--that will not be all natives.)
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Old 08-17-2011, 08:04 PM   #3
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
That makes me more determined than ever to create a fully functioning, all native haven for them (and others) on our 2 acres.

(As mentioned before, I'm not counting my vegetable garden--that will not be all natives.)
No, but that vegetable garden will thrive with all of the pollinators you will have attracted with those future natives. I'm just a little worried that by the time you get those natives in the ground, we'll be in a different age. Perhaps the reign of the snow fleas, or the GM lemurs.

Just another friendly prompt to get your butt in gear from you friend Jack!
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Old 08-17-2011, 09:05 PM   #4
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No, but that vegetable garden will thrive with all of the pollinators you will have attracted with those future natives.

Just another friendly prompt to get your butt in gear from you friend Jack!
There are a lot of present/current natives that I've already added. There will always be future natives I've yet to add. I find it hard to believe I'll ever get to the place where I'm looking for a spot to squeeze just one more in!

Prompts are good...especially when I've been inactive...but I want you to know I've made a lot of improvements already, just many of them are lost on the property or yet to mature enough to bear fruits.
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Old 08-18-2011, 05:45 AM   #5
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We've continued to see a good deal of bumble bee activity on our property this year - in addition to a variety of flowers (they seem quite fond of the monarda in particular), we have many fruit trees, small fruits including blueberries, and clover is is taking over in many places in the yard...
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Old 08-18-2011, 10:59 AM   #6
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We've continued to see a good deal of bumble bee activity on our property this year - in addition to a variety of flowers (they seem quite fond of the monarda in particular), we have many fruit trees, small fruits including blueberries, and clover is is taking over in many places in the yard...
Yes!!! though an alien species, the clover is definitely invaluable to the bee population. It's ubiquitous anyway, so even purists have to appreciate it or (god forbid) use herbicides to attempt to eradicate it.
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Old 08-18-2011, 11:07 AM   #7
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It's ubiquitous anyway, so even purists have to appreciate it...
I'd be wary of telling purists what they have to do!
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Old 08-25-2011, 10:54 PM   #8
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Last summer I came across a hive of ground dwellers,, They looked like common Bombus and there had to be more than 50 adults. I'm quite familiar with the property and they had inhabited an un-used rodent[?] tunnel probably dug by a rabbit. The lack of Insecticides and a steady supply of flower pollen are certainly a factor. The house had a large overhang and the nest was near the Foundation so the Soil remained relatively dry,,I can theorize that a large conifer would supply the same conditions. That was the first time I ever saw Bumble Bees just climb out of the ground in such large numbers. I slowly backed away and while I received no stings my Adrenaline was pumping.
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