Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Insects, Arachnids, & Gastropods

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 08-03-2011, 10:35 PM   #1
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default Where did you say those bees nested?

USGS Release: Picky Pollinators (6/21/2011 12:00:00 PM)

Quote:
"We had suspected that the closer our collecting sites were to each other the more similar the bees communities we found would be – but we were wrong," Grundel said. "In fact, mere physical proximity wasn't a very good predictor of how similar bee communities at different sites would be to each other. Instead, local factors – and even the micro-habitats that we often ignore – are really important in determining what kinds of bees use an area."
Because many native bees are ground- and cavity-nesters, the scientists weren’t surprised to find that an abundant supply of dead wood, such as woody debris and dead tree limbs, was essential in determining what kinds of bees lived where. They were surprised, however, at how important other factors were, including bee preferences for specific soil characteristics and for areas that had burned in the previous two years.
More if your interested...
http://www.glsc.usgs.gov/_files/publications/1564.pdf
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-03-2011, 10:54 PM   #2
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
Default

Though this is exactly the information I've been looking for, the material is very difficult to follow, as least at this late hour. I found myself at first understanding that a savanna was most conductive to bumblebee livelihood, and then a chart showed more bees caught in open areas than in prairies. I missed something somewhere...

I'll give it another try tomorrow on a good night's sleep.

Yesterday on a post I asked what the pollinator study groups did with the information gained about endangered species like B. affinis. This article probably is the answer in that it illustrates how habitat and flower availability determine not only bee numbers, but also bee species.

They want to know what kind of habitat the endangered species thrives in, I bet.
__________________
"Know thyself."

Oracle at Delphi
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 12:44 PM   #3
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

Are you up for a bit more bee info...

Backup Bees - Science News

Quote:
It’s a bee lock. Instead of keeping air from escaping, the way an air lock on a submarine or space station does, this box will prevent bees from zipping out of a five-acre mesh tent, explained pollination biologist Gordon Wardell of Paramount Farming during a tour last winter.
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 02:18 PM   #4
Grub
 
papercarver's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Newbury, Massachusetts
Default

"In fact, mere physical proximity wasn't a very good predictor of how similar bee communities at different sites would be to each other. Instead, local factors – and even the micro-habitats that we often ignore – are really important in determining what kinds of bees use an area."

I am increasingly convinced that understanding micro-habitats is crucial to successful "native gardening" or "habitat gardening" - just planting the right plants won't cut it. Foe me this makes an already complex and overwhelming subject that much more complex and overwhelming. At the same time, I find it somewhat encouraging that micro-climates matter so much; it means that changes to small yards and gardens CAN have real impact.

Through no cleverness on my part whatsoever, I seem to have provided pretty good habitat for the local tiny pollinators, as most of my flowering plants are heavily visited by a variety of small bees, flies and beetles, not to mention bumblebees and solitary wasps.

I have also started making garden sculptures that are designed to be pollinator nesting sites. At the moment I've got two of them installed (neither in my own yard, sadly enough) and they are being used by pollinators!

Here are some photos of one of the sculptures...
Attached Thumbnails
Where did you say those bees nested?-pollinate-1-email.jpg   Where did you say those bees nested?-pollinate-3-email.jpg   Where did you say those bees nested?-pollinate-4-email.jpg  
__________________
We can restore the biodiversity of our land the same way we destroyed it - one garden at a time.
papercarver is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 02:34 PM   #5
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

Jack, some of the information may seem contradictory because the data was both for number of bee species present in each area and the total of all bees present.
The charts are confusing. I'm still pondering those.
I agree the information about where and how bees actually live is of utmost importance. Raising a few bees would not help near as much as knowing how not to disrupt them in the first place.



Quote:
Bee abundance – how many bees were captured at a site – was lower in areas with a dense tree canopy and higher if a fire had occurred recently in the area.

Bee diversity – the number of different kinds of bees – was higher in areas with less tree canopy, but with a higher diversity of flowering plants and an abundance of nesting resources, such as woody debris.
Quote:
The presence of suitable nesting material was at least as important in determining how many types of bees might use a site as was diversity of plants, which provide nectar and pollen to the bees. The composition of an entire bee community was linked to higher plant variety, less canopy cover and soil characteristics that may be best-suited for nesting
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 08-04-2011, 02:39 PM   #6
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

papercarver, nice dual purpose bee nesting.
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bees, nested

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 09:02 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2