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Old 08-06-2011, 10:50 PM   #21
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Originally Posted by Bulucanagria View Post
The wasp in the first three photos (third is a crop) was everywhere on this large bush.
Very cool "The slender black and yellow wasps are in the family Tiphiidae". I like it...would like to have some in our yard.
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Old 09-01-2011, 07:11 PM   #22
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I lost track of this thread when I disappeared for the summer with my kids.

Re: interfering with nature and my spider wasp - I wasn't trying to save the spider. The wasp kept insisting on dragging it and herself into the swimming pool with us. This seemed like a very bad idea on all counts. We simply convinced her to go around. Thank you, suunto. I made an assumption on the spider id rather than looking it up, since it was so big. Rabid wolf spider. What a cool name for a spider!

These species have already been posted, but I took some nice shots on my goldenrod today. Wasps seem to be particularly attracted to goldenrod, Joe-pye, milkweed, and eryngo.

First, Eremnophila areonatata, identified by her white-silver patches on the thorax and blue-black body, on solidago.

wasps, the unpopular pollinators-e.-aureonata-spanning-flowers-web.jpg
wasps, the unpopular pollinators-e.-aureonata-sipping-best-web.jpg

Four toothed mason wasp, M. quadridens (suunto, I didn't think insects had teeth, so how can a mason wasp be four toothed?)

wasps, the unpopular pollinators-mason-wasp-four-toothed-mason-wasp-monobia-quadridens-solidago-web.jpg

Finally, these two were on my marsh eryngo last month. They look identical except for the color of the patches on them. I have not identified them as of now.
wasps, the unpopular pollinators-wasps-marsh-eryngo-web.jpg
wasps, the unpopular pollinators-wasps-two-colors-marsh-eryngo.jpg
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Old 09-05-2011, 04:44 PM   #23
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I've been taking photos of wasps too, and they usually go about their business without aggrevating me. Last Friday I was stung by what I can only suppose was a wasp ro maybe a hornet because there was no stinger left in my leg and it hurt like a M*&^%F^%$#r.

I was minding my own business, sitting on a chair on my deck when I felt the sting on my knee. I was wearing a denim jumper and perhaps the wasp flew up and got stuck in a fold of cloth and freaked. I haven't been stung since I was a kid so it was surprising. A couple of nights of icing and Ibuprofen and Lanacane have helped. Now I feel I need to reacclimate myself to liking the little buggers again!
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Old 09-05-2011, 07:17 PM   #24
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Four toothed mason wasp, M. quadridens (suunto, I didn't think insects had teeth, so how can a mason wasp be four toothed?)

Attachment 26238

Finally, these two were on my marsh eryngo last month. They look identical except for the color of the patches on them. I have not identified them as of now.
[ATTACH]Attachment 26236[/ATTACH]
“Teeth” in insects often refer to structures that are tooth-like in appearance that may or may not have anything to do with mastication. Examples include ‘teeth’ on mandibles (and these at least are tooth-like in function) - see http://chirokey.skullisland.info/med...al%20tooth.jpg for an example, and on legs - see Lesser Stag Beetle (m) Dorcus parallelipipedus 1d | Flickr - Photo Sharing! for an example. In the case of Monobia quadridens, I believe that the ‘teeth’ are on its legs. BTW, there is another mason wasp in a different genus (Euodynerus bidens) that can look remarkably similar - see Euodynerus bidens
The other wasps are in the family Scoliidae; I suspect that they are two color morphs of Scolia nobilitata - see Species Scolia nobilitata - BugGuide.Net Scoliid wasps are parasitoid/predatory on the larvae of scarab beetles.
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Old 09-05-2011, 08:49 PM   #25
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OK, some more Goldenrod-pollinating wasps. These first three are the same I believe.
wasps, the unpopular pollinators-wasp-022a.jpgwasps, the unpopular pollinators-wasp-149a.jpgwasps, the unpopular pollinators-wasp-141a.jpg

While this one was definitely different (and beautiful!)
wasps, the unpopular pollinators-wasp-140a.jpg

This one was quite interesting. I usually wouldn't include such a poor photo in a post but I wanted to describe this guy's behavior and this will give you a referent.
While I later saw one of these wasps on some Goldenrod, I first spotted one on the ground. I noticed a small hole nearby which may have been it's nest. This wasp would fly a few inches, then pace a bit, fly a few inches and pace a bit, repeating this behavior for quite a while. It seemed like it was trying to either draw or drive me away from the (supposed) nest. What was really interesting, though, is that it had a bright red abdomen (barely visible in the photo). As it paced and flew it moved it's wings in such a way that it's abdomen seemed to be a red, blinking light! It was so distinct and noticeable that at first I thought there was phosphoresence involved. Unfortunately, all the pacing and flying didn't lend itself to clear pictures, but I was thrilled to observe such cool behavior.
wasps, the unpopular pollinators-wasp-119a.jpg
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Old 09-05-2011, 09:12 PM   #26
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Way cool, Bulu'! Clearly it was the rare and endangered traffic signal wasp, whose blinking red abdomen is a warning to stop and watch it!

I love the third photo of the three on your goldenrod. I had the same kind last year, though I haven't seen them this year. I don't remember what suunto said they were.

Linrose, I'm sorry you got stung. Benadryl helps, too, and I find ammonia ("the Itch Eraser") if put on immediately after a sting can really help to limit how long it lasts. That being said, nothing makes not painful. I had one get me like that, for no apparent reason, the year before we moved here. So far, my NC wasps have been well behaved. What is funny is that my son, who has had no major bad experiences with wasps, has been phobic about them his entire life, while I have been stung by bees or wasps a half a dozen times that I can recall and I still think they are cool (just give them some respect).
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Old 09-06-2011, 05:50 AM   #27
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulucanagria View Post
OK, some more Goldenrod-pollinating wasps. These first three are the same I believe.
Attachment 26342Attachment 26346Attachment 26344

While this one was definitely different (and beautiful!)
Attachment 26345

This one was quite interesting. I usually wouldn't include such a poor photo in a post but I wanted to describe this guy's behavior and this will give you a referent.
While I later saw one of these wasps on some Goldenrod, I first spotted one on the ground. I noticed a small hole nearby which may have been it's nest. This wasp would fly a few inches, then pace a bit, fly a few inches and pace a bit, repeating this behavior for quite a while. It seemed like it was trying to either draw or drive me away from the (supposed) nest. What was really interesting, though, is that it had a bright red abdomen (barely visible in the photo). As it paced and flew it moved it's wings in such a way that it's abdomen seemed to be a red, blinking light! It was so distinct and noticeable that at first I thought there was phosphoresence involved. Unfortunately, all the pacing and flying didn't lend itself to clear pictures, but I was thrilled to observe such cool behavior.
Attachment 26347
The wasps in the first three photos appear to be northern paper wasps (Polistes fuscatus; Hymenoptera: Vespidae) - see Northern Paper Wasp - Polistes fuscatus (with eggs in nest) photo - Tom Murray photos at pbase.com. The fourth one looks like a European paper wasp, Polistes dominulus - see Polistes dominulus photo - Tom Murray photos at pbase.com The 'signal wasp' is in the family Sphecidae (digger wasps), but the image is not clear enough for me to hazard a guess as to specific identification. There are several species that can have a similar appearance; see Sphex lucae photo - Tom Murray photos at pbase.com and Prionyx parkeri photo - Tom Murray photos at pbase.com for a couple of examples.
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Old 10-10-2011, 12:59 PM   #28
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Although, I've taken pictures of wasps long before this thread started, this is the first time I've had one to share.
Attached Thumbnails
wasps, the unpopular pollinators-dsc05320.jpg  
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Old 10-10-2011, 01:25 PM   #29
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Doesn't hardly look like one taken at that angle. He looks so, Ah, Ummmm, jointed?
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Old 10-10-2011, 04:14 PM   #30
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Doesn't hardly look like one taken at that angle. He looks so, Ah, Ummmm, jointed?

I had to look back...I see what you mean.

Here is another angle:
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wasps, the unpopular pollinators-dsc05327.jpg  
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