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Old 07-30-2011, 11:12 AM   #11
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turttle,

I'm so glad to see your wasp pictures added to this thread. If you hadn't already, I would've suggested it.

Funny, as much as I liked the 2nd one (posted first in another thread), the *3rd* one here is amazing.
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Old 07-30-2011, 09:04 PM   #12
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If it looks like this
wasps, the unpopular pollinators-metallic-green-bee-agapostemon-texanus-01.jpg
or the one here
Augochlora pura female
then it's a bee.
That's about all I can tell you, though, except that they're extremely beautiful.
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Old 07-30-2011, 10:17 PM   #13
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She's beautiful, Bulu' . when I get home I need to post my pretty non-stripey green metallic bee. I am killing time at the airport doing this on my phone and I don't think it is worth it.
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Old 08-01-2011, 10:11 PM   #14
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Spider Wasp, anyone?

Tachypompilus ferrugineus, about an inch long, dragging a much larger Carolina Wolf spider (Hogna carolinensis). Very, very determined, kept trying to drag it into the swimming pool at the beach after we rescued her once. We moved her to the other side, since she was sure she wanted to go that way. She wouldn't leave her prey, or get aggressive with us, despite all of our efforts with her over about fifteen minutes. When last seen she was dragging her catch over the sand, hopefully to find a hole for it to lay her eggs. Poor spider.

wasps, the unpopular pollinators-tachypompilus-ferrugineus-carolina-wolf-spider-web.jpg

(we are on the Outer Banks again, miserably poor internet connection, won't be on much this week)
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Old 08-02-2011, 07:37 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turttle View Post
Spider Wasp, anyone?

Tachypompilus ferrugineus, about an inch long, dragging a much larger Carolina Wolf spider (Hogna carolinensis).
Very nice photo, but I believe that the spider actually is a large female rabid wolf spider (Rabidosa rabida) - see Anybody Seen My Focus?: Rabid Wolf Spider (Rabidosa rabida) than a Carolina wolf spider.
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Old 08-02-2011, 09:01 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by turttle View Post
Spider Wasp, anyone?

Tachypompilus ferrugineus, about an inch long, dragging a much larger Carolina Wolf spider (Hogna carolinensis). Very, very determined, kept trying to drag it into the swimming pool at the beach after we rescued her once. We moved her to the other side, since she was sure she wanted to go that way. She wouldn't leave her prey, or get aggressive with us, despite all of our efforts with her over about fifteen minutes. When last seen she was dragging her catch over the sand, hopefully to find a hole for it to lay her eggs. Poor spider.

(we are on the Outer Banks again, miserably poor internet connection, won't be on much this week)
An excellent capture of nature happening! I know it's tempting to interfere, but the wasp is just doing what it has to for survival. I tried rescuing a toad from a garter Snake that had the toad 3/4 swallowed once, didn't work though. Apparently the toad had been affected by the snake's weak venom already and didn't survive.

John
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Old 08-02-2011, 10:50 AM   #17
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Quote:
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...I believe that the spider actually is a large female rabid wolf spider (Rabidosa rabida) ...
What a name!
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Old 08-02-2011, 10:54 AM   #18
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I know how you feel, turttle...but I think I agree with John:
Quote:
Originally Posted by jpdenk View Post
I know it's tempting to interfere, but the wasp is just doing what it has to for survival. I tried rescuing a toad from a garter Snake that had the toad 3/4 swallowed once, didn't work though. Apparently the toad had been affected by the snake's weak venom already and didn't survive.
...but who knows what I'd do in certain situations. While growing up, I know I have saved things from the jaws of a cat.

...and it is a gross fate for the spider. Sad to say, but many things in nature are gross and seem cruel...but there is a lot of beauty too.
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Old 08-05-2011, 10:32 PM   #19
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These are on a flowering Apache Plume that I found in the desert of central NM the day after a rain. The wasp in the first three photos (third is a crop) was everywhere on this large bush. I got several pictures of him but these two are the best.
The wasp in the last two photos (the second a crop), was much less abundant and shyer. This was the only shot of him I got, but it turned out pretty well I'd say.
wasps, the unpopular pollinators-apache-plume-fallugia-paradoxa-13.jpgwasps, the unpopular pollinators-apache-plume-fallugia-paradoxa-14.jpgwasps, the unpopular pollinators-apache-plume-fallugia-paradoxa-13a.jpgwasps, the unpopular pollinators-apache-plume-fallugia-paradoxa-22.jpgwasps, the unpopular pollinators-apache-plume-fallugia-paradoxa-22a.jpg
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Old 08-06-2011, 11:04 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bulucanagria View Post
These are on a flowering Apache Plume that I found in the desert of central NM the day after a rain. The wasp in the first three photos (third is a crop) was everywhere on this large bush. I got several pictures of him but these two are the best.
The wasp in the last two photos (the second a crop), was much less abundant and shyer. This was the only shot of him I got, but it turned out pretty well I'd say.
Attachment 25448Attachment 25449Attachment 25450Attachment 25451Attachment 25452
The slender black and yellow wasps are in the family Tiphiidae, the more robust ones are in the family Scoliidae. Members of both families parasitize larvae of beetles in the family Scarabaeidae (May beetles, etc.).
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