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Old 07-19-2011, 11:13 PM   #11
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Originally Posted by dapjwy View Post
Cool. Go for it, I'll do my best to post my photos there...you can help me with the IDs.
Ok, we start tomorrow, and anyone else who wants to pursue the elusive rarity can also take part.
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Old 07-19-2011, 11:21 PM   #12
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Default Details on B. affinis from Xerces

http://www.xerces.org/wp-content/upl...tus_review.pdf


"Also, B. affinis, B. terricola, and B.
occidentalis have short tongues. On average, worker’s tongues in these species are
around 5 to 7 mm in length, whereas some bumble bees have tongues as long as 10 mm
(Medler 1962; Pyke 1982). Because of their short tongues, B. affinis, B. terricola, and B.
occidentalis are not able to properly access the nectar in flowers with deep tubes. They
will sometimes use their mandibles to chew holes in the bottom of these flowers to access
the nectar from the outside of the flower, thus cheating the flower of pollination. The
effect of this on plant fitness is variable, sometimes decreasing seed set, sometimes
increasing it due to an increase in foraging activity (Irwin and Brody 1999; Maloof
2001). However, short-tongued bees are better suited for pollination of open flowers and
those with short tubes, including cranberry (Patten et al. 1993). Longer tongue length
increases flower handling time and reduces foraging efficiency when foraging on shorter
tubed flowers (Inouye 1980; Plowright and Plowright 1997; Peat et al. 2005).
Bumble bees are more vulnerable to extinction than many other species due to their
haplodiploid method of sex determination (Zayed and Packer 2005). As their populations
become smaller, reduction in genetic diversity due to increased inbreeding results in an
increase in production of non-viable diploid male bees."

" Habitat requirements - B. affinis, B. terricola, and B. occidentalis require habitats with rich supplies of floral
resources with continuous blooming from spring to autumn. Landscape level habitat
quality has been shown to influence bumble bee species richness and abundance,
indicating that isolated patches of habitat are not sufficient to fully support bumble bee
populations (Hatfield and LeBuhn 2007; Öckinger and Smith 2007). Bombus affinis,
Bombus terricola, and Bombus occidentalis primarily nest underground, typically in
abandoned rodent nests located from six to eighteen inches below the surface (Plath
1927; Thorp et al. 1983; Laverty and Harder 1988). Occasionally nests will be
constructed on the surface in areas such as clumps of grass on the ground (Hobbs 1968;
Macfarlane et al. 1994). Thus, nesting sites may be limited by the abundance of rodents
and the presence of undisturbed grassland."
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Old 07-20-2011, 10:37 AM   #13
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I'll join, too. Let's extend the thread to NC. I'll post my photos from my journal when we start, and see who else I can find. I don't recognize B.affinis as one I've seen, but NC was on the range map they posted. I'll have to go and look in other gardens around here.
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Old 07-20-2011, 11:24 AM   #14
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I searched for the picture I mentioned last night, but I can't seem to locate it. I even went back a few days in case I'd lost track of time. No luck. I wonder if I deleted it. It was not an artistic shot, and the bumble was on the dreaded mugwort. I don't remember deleting it, but can't find it.

I took the shot because the bumble looked different than others I'd seen. I did have a small rufus spot...but it seemed rather small itself, possibly deformed. If I find that shot, I'll add it later, in the mean time, here is another bumble that has that rusty color to it--possibly Bombus rufocinctus or B. ternarius.
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Be on the Lookout for Bombus affinis-bumble.jpg   Be on the Lookout for Bombus affinis-bumble-2.jpg   Be on the Lookout for Bombus affinis-bumble-3.jpg  
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Old 07-20-2011, 12:21 PM   #15
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I'll join, too. Let's extend the thread to NC. I'll post my photos from my journal when we start, and see who else I can find. I don't recognize B.affinis as one I've seen, but NC was on the range map they posted. I'll have to go and look in other gardens around here.
Great, Turttle. This will be an education for me, as of right now, I can't tell one bumblebee from another. It's something I'm interested in, though. I'll learn.

I had some errands to do this morning and haven't been out to search yet today. But on my way in the house I did a quick walk around and, though I saw many native bees, I didn't see one bumblebee. I'll check more diligently later. It's very hot here today and I don't even hear a lawn mower going - something that is almost a constant in my neighborhood.

It would be great if we found an A. affinis. But, even if we don't, we'll learn what is most numerous in NC, Penn, and Mass.
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Old 07-20-2011, 12:26 PM   #16
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Glad you are joining in, turttle.

As to the short tongue...which flowers are best for these bumbles? I have some early godlenrod blooming now. I'd guess it should be a good one.

I definitely need to get a succession of bloom going here and larger patches of flowers.
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Old 07-20-2011, 12:35 PM   #17
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Glad you are joining in, turttle.

As to the short tongue...which flowers are best for these bumbles? I have some early godlenrod blooming now. I'd guess it should be a good one.

I definitely need to get a succession of bloom going here and larger patches of flowers.
Hi Dap. The pictures you posted were interesting but not clear enough for an id. The middle one had some interesting reddish color in it's abdomen, but let's go for close-ups. Of course, I have to find a bumble bee here before I can take a picture of one. I have some Agastache growing near my vegetable garden, there's usually a couple round there. It's also near the pond, so I'll get that picture I promised...
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Old 07-20-2011, 01:28 PM   #18
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Hi Dap. The pictures you posted were interesting but not clear enough for an id. The middle one had some interesting reddish color in it's abdomen, but let's go for close-ups...
These were pictures I've taken in the past week or so, I will try for better close-ups in the future, but I can't promise that any of mine will be good enough for an ID.


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It's also near the pond, so I'll get that picture I promised...
I really like the first picture you posted of your pond! Especially after your comment on my "pond of the mind".

...But I'd love to see what else you have to offer in way of a pond.
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Old 07-20-2011, 10:28 PM   #19
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I had deleted the picture of the Bombus in question. I got it out of the recycle bin. It is blurry and surly not good enough for ID purposes, but I'll include it here anyway...along with some other more common looking Bombus.
Attached Thumbnails
Be on the Lookout for Bombus affinis-297.jpg   Be on the Lookout for Bombus affinis-bombus-id-needed.jpg  
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Old 07-21-2011, 12:00 AM   #20
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bumblebee

I'll join in the search but I haven't ANY knowledge in identifying them.....
Do you want photos of all bumbles for identifying.... past, present or just the ones with the rust colors?
Still want me to jump on board?
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