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Old 06-30-2011, 08:58 PM   #31
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The purple milkweed also lack the fuzz-fur on their stems.
Ahh, I'll check that tomorrow.
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Old 07-11-2011, 07:55 PM   #32
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I am busily making common milkweed from stem cuttings so I can get some growing on my property. No luck last year transplanting (they have a really deep tap root, and with our clay soil I undoubtedly did not get enough of it for the plants to survive). They are rooting nicely and I'm waiting for the heat to calm down so I can plant them.

I haven't seen any monarch caterpillars on any of my milkweed Lots of pollinators on the flowers, and yellow aphids, but no caterpillars. I haven't seen any monarchs flying around, either, and not as many butterflies overall as last year despite the large increase in flowers at my house; maybe it is the difference in the weather this year. Any of you noticed this elsewhere in the country?
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Old 07-11-2011, 09:06 PM   #33
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I am busily making common milkweed from stem cuttings so I can get some growing on my property. No luck last year transplanting (they have a really deep tap root, and with our clay soil I undoubtedly did not get enough of it for the plants to survive). They are rooting nicely and I'm waiting for the heat to calm down so I can plant them.

I haven't seen any monarch caterpillars on any of my milkweed Lots of pollinators on the flowers, and yellow aphids, but no caterpillars. I haven't seen any monarchs flying around, either, and not as many butterflies overall as last year despite the large increase in flowers at my house; maybe it is the difference in the weather this year. Any of you noticed this elsewhere in the country?
Did you use only water to start the cuttings? Did the cuttings take root rapidly?? I also tried to transplant an Asclepias syriaca last year and also found I didn't get enough of the deep tap root.
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Old 07-11-2011, 09:12 PM   #34
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I haven't seen any monarch caterpillars on any of my milkweed Lots of pollinators on the flowers, and yellow aphids, but no caterpillars. I haven't seen any monarchs flying around, either, and not as many butterflies overall as last year despite the large increase in flowers at my house; maybe it is the difference in the weather this year. Any of you noticed this elsewhere in the country?
Yes, I have noticed the same here. Every day I go out to look at my one blooming butterflyweed (I lost one, another is getting ready to bloom, and the newest has no flowerbuds this year. Oh, and one that I grew from seed and transplanted is up and growing--hopefully the others survived too.)...I've not seen one monarch...and have only seen ONE butterfly at the flowers...and that was yesterday. Again, nothing today.

Hopefully, they are just a bit late this year. It is discouraging--especially when I had monarch cats last year...and quite a variety of butterflies at the blooms.
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Old 07-11-2011, 09:14 PM   #35
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Did you use only water to start the cuttings? Did the cuttings take root rapidly?? I also tried to transplant an Asclepias syriaca last year and also found I didn't get enough of the deep tap root.

Apparently, I lucked out. I dug some out of a friend's vegetable garden (they were going to weed it out anyway), and it survived...in two different spots. No flowers this year, but at least I have some milkweed started.
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Old 07-12-2011, 12:07 AM   #36
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Not many monarchs here yet. I had 16 in early May which was quite unusual. I released 2 this week, but haven't found any eggs in weeks. I found 4 eggs this morning and gave them to John to raise as I am heading up the road to Maine tomorrow!

David, you noticed that there aren't as many butterflies this year. John and I were just commenting on that last week. We saw 'many' tiger swallowtails in PA in late May, but very few down here and still not many of any kind. I did have the pleasure of watching a black swallowtail lay her eggs on my dill and fennel this morning! That is always very uplifting.

The trick with common milkweed is to get it in the ground asap and water the heck out of it. Expect the leaves to fall off, but new growth will come out of the tap root. I have a ton of milkweed this year (all kinds) and no eggs in my own garden. Yet.
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Old 07-12-2011, 12:13 AM   #37
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We took a 400 mile trip today and having noticed your discussion upon my return....
I uploaded a few photos of them for you I had taken in our journey so you can hopefully see that their leaf system is NOT the same.
Attachment 24401
By the looks of these I'd say they are not as soft, blue and powdery looking
Attachment 24402
and not as wide as the leaf of an ordinary milkweed.
Attachment 24404
(Ordinary Milkweed) For comparison
The first two photos appear to be A. incarnata, swamp milkweed. the purple milkweed does resemble the common. Swamp has very smooth leaves and lacks the fuzziness of the underside of the leaf. Monarchs still seem to enjoy it! I am not sure, but I may have some in the garden. Most of my 'common' has been dug up and transplanted from roadsides. I will have to study it more when I get back from Maine.
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Old 07-12-2011, 12:17 PM   #38
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Did you use only water to start the cuttings? Did the cuttings take root rapidly?? I also tried to transplant an Asclepias syriaca last year and also found I didn't get enough of the deep tap root.
Jack, I used Rootone, from Garden Tech, which is Naphthaleneacetamide powder. You dip the cut ends in the powder then plop them into your growing medium, for which I've just used potting soil with good results. Within a few weeks many things root well. My A. syrica is doing well (the two I left with multiple pairs of leaves have lost their leaves, but the stems are green and they are budding new leaves now at three weeks; the one I left a single pair of leaves on has kept its leaves). I have successfully propagated swamp milkweed, buttonbush, lantana and viburnum this way.

I suspect you could just put the cuttings with the rooting hormone directly into the ground if you were willing to water it like crazy reliably while it is getting its roots, but with our heat and my lack of irrigation, it seems easier to start them in a pot and put them into the ground when they have decent roots, 2-4 weeks depending on the species, weather and my degree of patience.

I already have A. incarnata (swamp), A. verticillata (narrow leaf), and A. turberosa (butterfly weed) in bloom, but no caterpillars. My A. rubra (red) and A. viridiflora (green) don't appear to have survived the winter, at least I see no evidence of them coming back up so far this year. I thought it would be cool to have as many kinds of milkweed as would grow here. Do any of the rest of you have milkweed gardens?
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Old 07-12-2011, 02:01 PM   #39
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Jack, I used Rootone, from Garden Tech, which is Naphthaleneacetamide powder. You dip the cut ends in the powder then plop them into your growing medium, for which I've just used potting soil with good results. Within a few weeks many things root well. My A. syrica is doing well (the two I left with multiple pairs of leaves have lost their leaves, but the stems are green and they are budding new leaves now at three weeks; the one I left a single pair of leaves on has kept its leaves). I have successfully propagated swamp milkweed, buttonbush, lantana and viburnum this way.

I suspect you could just put the cuttings with the rooting hormone directly into the ground if you were willing to water it like crazy reliably while it is getting its roots, but with our heat and my lack of irrigation, it seems easier to start them in a pot and put them into the ground when they have decent roots, 2-4 weeks depending on the species, weather and my degree of patience.

I already have A. incarnata (swamp), A. verticillata (narrow leaf), and A. turberosa (butterfly weed) in bloom, but no caterpillars. My A. rubra (red) and A. viridiflora (green) don't appear to have survived the winter, at least I see no evidence of them coming back up so far this year. I thought it would be cool to have as many kinds of milkweed as would grow here. Do any of the rest of you have milkweed gardens?
I have swamp, butterfly weed, narrow leaf, and purple. I just ordered seeds to try this coming year. They are Poke Milkweed, Tall Green Milkweed, Eastern Purple Milkweed, and Prairie Milkweed. Directions are supposedly coming with the seeds, though I'm sure I'll be asking for advice when it comes time. Some of them require stratification, and I'll plant them in November. The others don't need anything, and I'll plant those in the Spring.

My problem is finding full sun locations. I have so much that I've planted that I have more of "half-shade" than anything else.

But, yes, a milkweed garden makes the most sense to me. It will attract beneficials for the vegetable garden, and it will attract the interesting insect species I am interested in knowing more about. I haven't seen a Monarch yet this year, though...
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Old 07-12-2011, 04:26 PM   #40
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I've been wanting to try rooting things--I remember my dad using Rootone--but I can't quite remember what results he had.

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Do any of the rest of you have milkweed gardens?
I'm including milkweed in our property...eventually, I guess I imagine some patches of common milkweed. The butterflyweed, I imagine, would be scattered through out the meadow.
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