Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Insects, Arachnids, & Gastropods

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-28-2011, 11:28 AM   #11
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

Thankyou...Thankyou
I've been wondering what those were!
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2011, 08:17 PM   #12
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by suunto View Post
A sweat bee (Hymenoptera: Halictidae)...
I can now clearly see the difference between a sweat bee and a hover fly.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2011, 08:24 PM   #13
WG Hospitality & UAOKA recipient
 
dapjwy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Pennsylvania
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by suunto View Post
Other than a few ants, the only insect that I can see well enough to attempt identify are a couple of flies that I believe are in the family Lauxaniidae - see Minettia sp. photo - Tom Murray photos at pbase.com for an example. Flowers are indeed a a great place to find and photograph a variety of insects!
I didn't stick around long enough to get many clear pictures--and I did stick around for a little while...I was thrilled to see so many things using the flower. There was also a housefly that flew off before I could get it in focus. A gentle breeze really screwwed up trying to get them all in focus.

The little red-eyed fly looks like it could be the Minettia sp. you sent in the link.

I'll try to get back there to see what else shows up. I have to admit that I was fascinated that the ants seemed interested in the developing seeds as much or more than the flowers.
__________________
"If suburbia were landscaped with meadows, prairies, thickets or forests, or combinations of these, then the water would sparkle, fish would be good to eat again, birds would sing and human spirits would soar." ~ Lorrie Otto
~ A Native Backyard Blog ~
dapjwy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2011, 09:04 PM   #14
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
Default Another Milkweed UFO

This guy was part of a swarm that was buzzing around a number of different plants, none of which were really yet in flower. The pictures I caught were of one on swamp milkweed.
Attached Thumbnails
Milkweed Microcosm-dsc00150.jpg   Milkweed Microcosm-dsc00153.jpg  
__________________
"Know thyself."

Oracle at Delphi
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2011, 07:23 AM   #15
The Bug Whisperer
 
suunto's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Monroe County, WV, USA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jack View Post
This guy was part of a swarm that was buzzing around a number of different plants, none of which were really yet in flower. The pictures I caught were of one on swamp milkweed.
I cannot see the fly clearly enough to be certain, but it could be a snipe fly (Diptera: Rhagionidae) in the genus Rhagio - see Rhagio tringarius photo - Tom Murray photos at pbase.com for an example.
__________________
“Every artist dips his brush in his own soul and paints his own nature into his pictures.”

Henry Ward Beecher
suunto is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2011, 09:40 AM   #16
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by suunto View Post
I cannot see the fly clearly enough to be certain, but it could be a snipe fly (Diptera: Rhagionidae) in the genus Rhagio - see Rhagio tringarius photo - Tom Murray photos at pbase.com for an example.
Thank you! That looks like it to me. Interesting also was the fact that the photo site you referred me to had a picture of the fly taken from the next town south of me here in Northern Ma.
__________________
"Know thyself."

Oracle at Delphi
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2011, 10:10 AM   #17
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

Nice pictures all. I like the anthers stuck to the beetles feet pic. that is one way to move that pollen about.
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2011, 10:25 AM   #18
A Bee's Best Friend
 
Gloria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: Chicago Illinois USA
Default

OK, I know this is kind of geeky but check this out.

common milkweed Marcia Bonta

Quote:
Honeybees are not the only insects trapped by one of the five narrow, stigmatic grooves that are part of a milkweed flower. Many others are similarly trapped but the heavier bumblebees, for instance, are able to pull free. In doing so, they pull up a pair of pollinia (many grains of pollen held together by a waxy coating), from the twin sacs on either side of the stigma and unwittingly carry it to the next milkweed flower. There the bumblebees go through the same routine and this time rub off the pollinia into the enlarged lower end of the stigmatic slit to finish the pollinating cycle. This mechanism is a great deal more complicated than I have described and it is utterly unique in the botanical world. Eager botanists have not only figured out the whole mechanism, but they have studying why and how it developed.
Flower Terminology (Part 1)
Attached Thumbnails
Milkweed Microcosm-milkwd8.jpg  
__________________
"Half Earth Quest" Edward O. Wilson

http://pollinators-welcome.blogspot.com/
Gloria is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2011, 10:41 AM   #19
WG Prize & Gift Coordinator
 
havalotta's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Michigan
Default

That wasn't Geeky at all.
It most clearly explains what those yellow sacks are on the milkweed bugs feet in photo #1.
__________________
The successful woman is the woman that had the chance and took it!

A walk among the elusive Whitetail Deer
havalotta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2011, 01:11 PM   #20
Fox
 
Bulucanagria's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: S. Grafton, Massachusetts
Default

Thanks, Gloria, for that information. If it is geeky, it's my kinda geeky!
__________________
BULUCANAGRIA'S FLICKR
Bulucanagria is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
microcosm, milkweed

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 05:15 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2