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Old 03-03-2012, 12:16 AM   #11
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They’re gonna release em if…. they haven’t already. So much for what the Key West community had to say about this. Where’s a link to the good folk in Key West that didn’t want their community turned into an open air experiment or didn’t that make its way to the news>>>? I loved the 2 guys who had a sign with a photo of their heads together on it that said “We’re humans NOT Oxitec’s lab rats” but…. the sign that said, “Eradicate Dengue Fever not Gays”.... big whoa. Oxitec isn’t even an American company so why let them “experiment” anywhere in our Country? It’s not like they’re gonna create any jobs or pay taxes here so exactly who paved the way for them to use any of our people as guinea pigs? And…. why Key West? Why not Corpus Cristi TX where skeeters have been blowing positive for St. Louis encephalitis and dengue? Things that make me go hmmmm…
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Old 03-03-2012, 08:49 PM   #12
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I would question the goal more than the methods. Two immediate questions I would have: 1) Are the population levels higher than historical levels? 2) What ripple effects would there be if the goal were achieved?
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Old 07-12-2012, 05:59 PM   #13
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Default Florida Keys residents resist release of dengue fever-immune mosquitoes

Florida Keys residents resist release of dengue fever-immune mosquitoes
Ed Pilkington in New York
guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 10 July 2012 15.38 EDT

Florida Keys residents resist release of dengue fever-immune mosquitoes | Environment | guardian.co.uk
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A British company that has developed a genetically modified mosquito to resist the spread of dengue fever is coming up against growing opposition to a plan to release the insects into the Florida Keys.

A Change.org petition started by a woman in Key West opposing the release has garnered almost 90,000 signatures and rising. "Say no to genetically modified mosquitoes release," the petition demands.

Mila de Mier, the author of the petition, began the campaign because she said she was worried about the lack of scientific understanding of what the insects could do to the delicate ecosystem of the Florida Keys. She accused Oxitec, the UK-based biotech firm that has developed the mosquito, of failing to listen to local wishes.
"We need more data. If something goes wrong the consequences could be catastrophic not only for humans but also the whole ecosystem…
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Old 07-13-2012, 04:32 PM   #14
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Ummm.... dengue fever isn’t endemic in Florida. See this….. no reports of dengue fever there since 2010, Florida Department of Health - Dengue. There’s a spattering of cases reported in FL each year but…..it’s my understanding they’re travelers who got it overseas. There’s no benefit to releasing them in the Keys…. so….. why should we allow it? Sorry…. I’m REALLY not liking any of us being used as Oxitec’s lab rats and there will be unintended consequences… we just won’t know what they are until after they’re released.
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Old 07-19-2012, 07:35 AM   #15
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This is a rather complicated issue - see Florida abuzz over mosquito plan : Nature News & Comment for a fairly comprehensive analysis. Speaking as a medical entomologist with considerable mosquito experience, my take is that the downside risk of this field study should be minimal (there is no such thing as zero risk), especially when compared with the potential knowledge to be gained. Given the presence of competent vectors, dengue certainly could become endemic in this region, as yellow fever once was.
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Old 07-20-2012, 10:43 AM   #16
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Originally Posted by midwesternerr View Post
I would question the goal more than the methods. Two immediate questions I would have: 1) Are the population levels higher than historical levels? 2) What ripple effects would there be if the goal were achieved?
I'd like to know the same. Especially now that we were home to some Barn Swallows, who eat mosquitoes, what effect will this have?! Droughts already reduce mosquito populations.
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Old 07-20-2012, 11:51 AM   #17
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I'd like to know the same. Especially now that we were home to some Barn Swallows, who eat mosquitoes, what effect will this have?! Droughts already reduce mosquito populations.
I have never seen any documentation that mosquitoes constitute a significant factor in any birds' diets. Given the small size of mosquitoes and the effort needed to capture them, birds (and bats) usually will go after them only when mosquito populations are very dense.
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Old 07-28-2012, 04:14 PM   #18
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They're a healthy chunk of a dragonfly's diet. Nymphs eat skeeter larvae and adult dragonflies chow down on skeeters too. And well.... dragonflies and damselflies can be a portion of a bird's diet. Most birds do have to feed their nestlings insects and I watch my bullfrog slurping down any dragonfly that flies by his face. There's lots of mosquitoe predators because... mosquitoes are a significant component of the food web.
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suunto> "my take is that the downside risk of this field study should be minimal (there is no such thing as zero risk), especially when compared with the potential knowledge to be gained" Should be minimal but there will be no way to contain it should we learn otherwise. I do understand where you're coming from but.... the locals aren't happy about the release and nobody's listening to them... nobody.... it's as if they have no say so at all in what's going on in their own community. Dengue fever is not endemic to that area so why not move their "field study" some place else where it is endemic>>>? Just because it could become endemic doesn't justify this release.... actually.... it blows my mind they're still even considering such a release for some perceived "greater good" what with so much public outcry and so many regions where dengue is endemic that they could release them. Why.... why do this to these people? I guess what I'd like to know is what's really going on.
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FWIW.... I’m really worried all this “greater good” rationale is paving the way for more of this in our future, ‘FDA Approved HIV Preventative Pill Marketed to Uninfected Public’, FDA Approved HIV Preventative Pill Marketed to Uninfected Public, ”The United Nations (UN) says that the geographic spread of HIV/AIDS is mostly focused on black people in Africa and the Southeast Asia region. This bioweapon is a directed attack on the densely populated areas in under-developed nations.
According to Henry Kissinger, in the National Security Memorandum (NSSM 200), “De-population should be the highest priority of US foreign policy towards the Third World . . . Reduction of the rate of population in these States [Third World nations] is a matter of vital US national security.” Kissinger goes on to state that, “The US economy will require large and increasing amounts of minerals from abroad, especially from less developed countries.” So Kissinger called a spade a spade by verbalizing what leaders of other countries figured out a while ago. Reality is the whole world has those minerals in their sights so there's a boatload of very powerful globalists out there prepared to do what ever they need to do to get their "fair share" of those minerals.
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Old 11-15-2012, 03:03 PM   #19
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Default Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Release in the Millions with No Risk Assessment

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes Release in the Millions with No Risk Assessment
by Mike Barrett
Natural Society
November 10th, 2012 | Updated 11/10/2012 at 5:27 am

Genetically Modified Mosquitoes in the Millions, No Risk Assessment
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In case you didn’t know, genetically modified mosquitoes have been unleashed numerous times on planet Earth. Thus far, millions mosquitoes were released in various locations; Cayman Islands, Malaysia, and Brazil. Now, the GM mosquito creator Oxitec may release millions of genetically modified mosquitoes in the fields of crops, including olives, citrus fruits, cabbage, tomatoes, and cotton.

A UK-based company, Oxitec is the maker of all genetically modified insects. The company’s goal is to create a global market, where GM insects will be released around the world in order to take over natural insect populations. With the replacement of natural insects…
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Old 02-07-2013, 02:08 PM   #20
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Default Baiting Mosquitoes with Knowledge and Proven Insecticides

Baiting Mosquitoes with Knowledge and Proven Insecticides
By Sandra Avant
November 13, 2012

Baiting Mosquitoes with Knowledge and Proven Insecticides / November 13, 2012 / News from the USDA Agricultural Research Service
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While one team of U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists is testing the effectiveness of pesticides against mosquitoes, another group is learning how repellents work.

At the Agricultural Research Service (ARS) Center for Medical, Agricultural and Veterinary Entomology (CMAVE) in Gainesville, Fla., entomologist Sandra Allan is using toxic sugar-based baits to lure and kill mosquitoes. Allan and her CMAVE cooperators are evaluating insecticides and designing innovative technology to fight biting insects and arthropods. ARS is USDA's principal intramural scientific research agency.

Allan studied 10 different commercial pesticides that contain additives that enable the pesticides to be dissolved in water and ingested by mosquitoes. Pesticides were combined with a sucrose solution and fed to females of three mosquito species that transmit pathogens such as West Nile virus and arboviruses. While only females feed on blood, all mosquitoes need to feed on sugar and will potentially be attracted to—and ingest—the toxic sugar bait...
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