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Old 06-26-2011, 08:03 PM   #41
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Per Wikipedia the Oyster Flower is the same genus, different species. Oyster Flower is Purple Salsify (Tragopogon porrifolius).
I think I'd only seen the seedhead in one of my wildflower books--calling it oyster flower--I probably never saw the color of the flower, just the seed head. Thanks for clarifying.


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I knew that the Yellow Goat's Beard was non-native from having ID'ed it from my earlier photograph. When I ID something I try to determine if it's native or not. I remember my disappointment upon learning that this beauty wasn't native. I had the same reaction about Chicory.
Hmm...I think I'd forgotten that when I first got into the idea of getting rid of lawn and putting back wildflowers, I had tried to cultivate--or wanted to include chickory in my meadow. It was so long ago (I was a teenager, I think)...I have to admit that I don't think twice about it now--I see it as an alien and have spotted one or two of them in my meadow and my reaction is to remove them.

I think I had a more disappointing realization with the hawkweeds--especially the shorter orange one--I still think they are beautiful, but I'm slowly trying to remove them from our property. ...Talk about confusion with common names...I grew up calling it Indian paintbrush...not until I was older did I learn the name "hawkweed".

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As I've mentioned before my friend's farm seems to be dominated by non-natives. I guess that's not unusual for land that's been continuously occupied and worked for three centuries.
Our house is what is left of a homestead that dates back at least into the late 1800s...who knows how long before that, that it was cleared. I find that there are still some natives dotted around the property, but not nearly as many as I'd like to find. I've got a *lot* of work ahead of me if I'm to transform it from a mostly European meadow back to an American meadow (or my closest approximation).

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As for the beauty of the chicory close up, I have to agree. The fact is that I take many macro shots of flowers and always find them fascinating. The structure, textures and colors are usually tremendous!
Keep the macro shots coming...it lets me see something in a whole new light.
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Old 06-26-2011, 09:14 PM   #42
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The first images are of a larva of a lady beetle (Coleoptera; Coccinellidae), apparently that of the Asian multi-colored lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis - see http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/c/cc/Harmonia_axyridis_-_larva_side_%28aka%29.jpg for a comparison. Unfortunately, I cannot provide a specific name for your little moth; these little buggers ('microlepidoptera') give me fits...
Well, I think that does nothing to dent your reputation as our resident expert. The fact is that through the internet in general and WG specifically, I'm learning so much about flora and fauna that I'll never retain it all. Insects and spiders in particular are so varied and subtle in their distinctions that I can only remember the names of the more common ones.
Still, I appreciate every ID you provide and the links to further information. Though I may not retain the specific information in my forebrain, I truly believe that it enters my subconscious and helps me grasp the interwoven macrocosm that is our planet, and indeed our universe. (Sorry, didn't mean to go all cosmic on you.)
Besides, I really included that "little bugger" because c'mon, look at him. He's so cool looking!


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Hmm...I think I'd forgotten that when I first got into the idea of getting rid of lawn and putting back wildflowers, I had tried to cultivate--or wanted to include chickory in my meadow. It was so long ago (I was a teenager, I think)...I have to admit that I don't think twice about it now--I see it as an alien and have spotted one or two of them in my meadow and my reaction is to remove them.

I think I had a more disappointing realization with the hawkweeds--especially the shorter orange one--I still think they are beautiful, but I'm slowly trying to remove them from our property. ...Talk about confusion with common names...I grew up calling it Indian paintbrush...not until I was older did I learn the name "hawkweed".


Our house is what is left of a homestead that dates back at least into the late 1800s...who knows how long before that, that it was cleared. I find that there are still some natives dotted around the property, but not nearly as many as I'd like to find. I've got a *lot* of work ahead of me if I'm to transform it from a mostly European meadow back to an American meadow (or my closest approximation).
I'll admit that I am torn. While I don't own my own property, I can (and do) speculate on how I would handle it if I did. Now, I'd definitely do everything possible to eliminate invasives but I'd be tempted to allow some of the more benign non-natives to remain. I'd certainly do the research to find out what effect they might have on the natives but I'd concentrate on problem plants and such. And I have to admit, call me shallow if you will, that beauty would affect my decisions.
Now, you're a man on a mission. You want to recreate, as closely as possible, a meadow from Pre-Colombian North America, and I applaud you for that effort and support you whole-heartedly. I just don't know if I have such a singularity of purpose on this issue.

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Keep the macro shots coming...it lets me see something in a whole new light.
Have no fear, they will not stop. I am slightly addicted to sharing beauty with those who can appreciate it. WG fills that bill perfectly.
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Old 06-26-2011, 10:27 PM   #43
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I'll admit that I am torn. While I don't own my own property, I can (and do) speculate on how I would handle it if I did. Now, I'd definitely do everything possible to eliminate invasives but I'd be tempted to allow some of the more benign non-natives to remain. I'd certainly do the research to find out what effect they might have on the natives but I'd concentrate on problem plants and such. And I have to admit, call me shallow if you will, that beauty would affect my decisions.
Now, you're a man on a mission. You want to recreate, as closely as possible, a meadow from Pre-Colombian North America, and I applaud you for that effort and support you whole-heartedly. I just don't know if I have such a singularity of purpose on this issue.


Have no fear, they will not stop. I am slightly addicted to sharing beauty with those who can appreciate it. WG fills that bill perfectly.
I guess I am a man on a mission. I never thought of it quite as you describe it, but I think your description is accurate. Will I ever succeed? Who knows...but I'll enjoy trying. I just know it is a long way from where I am right now.

As for you, I am just glad that you appreciate the natural world as much as you do...and you are aware of the issues of invasives...that is WAY more than many people.

Great, glad you enjoy sharing the pictures; we enjoy looking.
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Old 07-01-2011, 08:09 PM   #44
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~Bugs on Blooms~-p1200786.jpg Really busy doing something!

~Bugs on Blooms~-p1200806.jpg
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Old 07-01-2011, 10:57 PM   #45
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Attachment 24448 Really busy doing something!

Attachment 24449

They look like Japanese beetles to me...and luckily the only ones I've seen so far this year are in your photos.
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Old 07-01-2011, 11:08 PM   #46
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At Ringneck Marsh Overlook, yes, japanese beetles, Asian Ladybugs, etc.
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Old 07-02-2011, 09:42 AM   #47
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Originally Posted by Bulucanagria View Post


I'll admit that I am torn. While I don't own my own property, I can (and do) speculate on how I would handle it if I did. Now, I'd definitely do everything possible to eliminate invasives but I'd be tempted to allow some of the more benign non-natives to remain. I'd certainly do the research to find out what effect they might have on the natives but I'd concentrate on problem plants and such. And I have to admit, call me shallow if you will, that beauty would affect my decisions.
Now, you're a man on a mission. You want to recreate, as closely as possible, a meadow from Pre-Colombian North America, and I applaud you for that effort and support you whole-heartedly. I just don't know if I have such a singularity of purpose on this issue.
This is always a great discussion - is there an alien worth preserving. Besides property border line trees too dangerous to take down or girdle, I only "allow" red clover on my property. It's such a favorite of the bumblebees and a free source of nitrogen, that I can't motivate myself to get rid of it. I also, of course, have Creeping Charlie, but that's because I haven't found a way of eradicating it!!!
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Old 07-02-2011, 10:15 AM   #48
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This is always a great discussion - is there an alien worth preserving. Besides property border line trees too dangerous to take down or girdle, I only "allow" red clover on my property. It's such a favorite of the bumblebees and a free source of nitrogen, that I can't motivate myself to get rid of it. I also, of course, have Creeping Charlie, but that's because I haven't found a way of eradicating it!!!
That is a great topic of discussion and I've been meaning to add to it. I did a search for the exact thread I was thinking of, to let you know about it...only to find that *you* are the one who started it, jack.

For others interested in the topic and to see what I (currently) "allow" to grow on our property, check out this link: Invasives you are most reluctant to eliminate

>Hey! How about that?! I got us back on track instead of going more of topic!!! That's a first!<
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Old 07-09-2011, 07:23 PM   #49
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Taken along the edge of Niagara Falls gorge while watching for Peregrines

~Bugs on Blooms~-p1210402.jpg

~Bugs on Blooms~-p1210406.jpg
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Old 07-09-2011, 10:40 PM   #50
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More time spent at the farm in the Milkweed fields and among other blooms. The first two are of the same individual. He stood out to me because he seemed particularly long compared to the many other types of bees that were servicing the Milkweeds. I took several shots of him, many of which were pretty good, but these two really blew me away.
~Bugs on Blooms~-marf-079a.jpg~Bugs on Blooms~-marf-083a.jpg
This beauty landed nearby and again, I took several shots but this was the only one that came out. It's a shame because he had that beautiful shade of blue on his body that caught my eye immediately. Unfortunately, after a few moments I saw him flapping his wings frantically for a while and, after he had flown away, I notice that he had left two legs behind. Somehow he had gotten the feet stuck in the blooms and couldn't free them. Since he had been feeding peacefully and unconcernedly while I was taking pictures, I don't think it was panic at my presence that caused this (although I confess to an itch on my conscience anyway).
~Bugs on Blooms~-marf-096a.jpg
While technically not on a bloom, this spider was on some Boneset and most of the other ones in the vicinity were in bloom, so I'm going to bend the rules a bit in order to include this stunner.
~Bugs on Blooms~-marf-185a.jpg
I'm not sure what flower this is but thick, extensive carpets of it were scattered throughout the meadow. It's quite beautiful and full of activity. This photo shows one small fragment of it.
~Bugs on Blooms~-marf-198a.jpg
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