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Old 06-26-2011, 12:32 PM   #31
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Yes, the second one is Chicory...
The color made me think of chicory, but upon opening it and seeing the close up, I was unsure. The close up brings out a beauty to an attractive flower.

Just for those who may think we only discuss native flowers: chicory is an alien from Europe that has become so common that many people may be surprised to find that they are not a native wildflower.

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Thanks, jack. My camera isn't anything fancy, just a point and shoot. The model is a Canon Powershot SX100.
I'll keep that in mind if I weaken and buy a camera of my own--maybe keep it just for the macro shots.
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Old 06-26-2011, 12:36 PM   #32
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This is a cute little hover fly (Diptera: Syrphidae); likely a Toxomerus sp. - see http://nathistoc.bio.uci.edu/diptera/Toxomerus%20marginatus%20004.jpg for an example.

I've gotta start calling them hover flies.

...Not that one should go by common names, but is the "sweat bee" a different species or just a misnomer for the hover fly?
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Old 06-26-2011, 12:46 PM   #33
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With that hint and Wikipedia, as well as memory and a browse through my photo files, I am 99% sure that it is Yellow Goat's Beard (Tragopogon pratensis). I have pictures of that plant in bloom from almost the exact spot where this photo was taken.
Teamwork! It's one of the things that makes WG special.

I thought "oyster flower"...then looking it up I see another common name "goat's beard" (which is something else entirely in my mind...hence a good reason to start using the botanical names---not something I do as often as I should)...good job, havalotta.

Unfortunately, it is another European/Eurasian alien. In the three years that I've let our feild grow up, I see that it looks more like a European meadow than an American one. Sad that so many of our favorite native wildflowers seem to be missing in action from our overly cultivated areas.
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Old 06-26-2011, 02:07 PM   #34
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With that hint and Wikipedia, as well as memory and a browse through my photo files, I am 99% sure that it is Yellow Goat's Beard (Tragopogon pratensis).
Teamwork! It's one of the things that makes WG special.
Don't ya just love it!
Goats beard is another name for the salisly...I've never heard of it called an oyster flower as Dapjwy has stated.
It's sure nice to have Dapjwys input stating it is not one of our native species...
Myself...I don't know which plants are native or not. But I'm learning....Now if I can only remember

I do know I'm starting to think more about choosing the natives over other species for my yarden though so somethings obviously sinking in..
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Old 06-26-2011, 02:33 PM   #35
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Per Wikipedia the Oyster Flower is the same genus, different species. Oyster Flower is Purple Salsify (Tragopogon porrifolius).
I knew that the Yellow Goat's Beard was non-native from having ID'ed it from my earlier photograph. When I ID something I try to determine if it's native or not. I remember my disappointment upon learning that this beauty wasn't native. I had the same reaction about Chicory. As I've mentioned before my friend's farm seems to be dominated by non-natives. I guess that's not unusual for land that's been continuously occupied and worked for three centuries.
As for the beauty of the chicory close up, I have to agree. The fact is that I take many macro shots of flowers and always find them fascinating. The structure, textures and colors are usually tremendous!
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Old 06-26-2011, 03:08 PM   #36
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I've gotta start calling them hover flies.

...Not that one should go by common names, but is the "sweat bee" a different species or just a misnomer for the hover fly?
"Sweat bees" are true bees in the order Hymenoptera; all true flies, such as hover/flower flies, are in the order Diptera. However, just to confusigate the issue, there are many insects outside of the order Diptera that have "fly" as part of their name (such as damselflies, dragonflies, scorpionflies, and dobsonflies)
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Old 06-26-2011, 06:28 PM   #37
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This is not from the farm visit (I promise those pics will be forthcoming) but from a short stop by a pond on the way to the store today. I believe the plant is a Viburnum, either Witherroot (Viburnum nudum) or Nannyberry (Viburnum lentago). The first picture is the bug (or nymph, maybe) on the bloom. The second is a close-up and the third shows him being unceremoniously used as a stepping stool by a bee.
~Bugs on Blooms~-dfg-036.jpg~Bugs on Blooms~-dfg-046a.jpg~Bugs on Blooms~-dfg-041a.jpg

As an added bonus, here's an otherworldly creature that visited me last night. To make him fit the category, I temporarily named my desk "Blooms".
~Bugs on Blooms~-dfg-018b.jpg
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Old 06-26-2011, 07:44 PM   #38
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"Sweat bees" are true bees in the order Hymenoptera; all true flies, such as hover/flower flies, are in the order Diptera. However, just to confusigate the issue, there are many insects outside of the order Diptera that have "fly" as part of their name (such as damselflies, dragonflies, scorpionflies, and dobsonflies)
Thanks, suunto.

I can see by the pictures that they do have that fly look to them...ike the bee mimic fly I saw before, these are easily mistaken (by predators...as well as me) for bees?
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Old 06-26-2011, 07:46 PM   #39
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It's sure nice to have Dapjwys input stating it is not one of our native species...
Myself...I don't know which plants are native or not. But I'm learning....Now if I can only remember

I do know I'm starting to think more about choosing the natives over other species for my yarden though so somethings obviously sinking in..
~smile~ (a slightly satisfied smile)
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Old 06-26-2011, 07:51 PM   #40
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The first picture is the bug (or nymph, maybe) on the bloom. The second is a close-up and the third shows him being unceremoniously used as a stepping stool by a bee.
Attachment 24320Attachment 24321Attachment 24322

As an added bonus, here's an otherworldly creature that visited me last night. To make him fit the category, I temporarily named my desk "Blooms".
Attachment 24323
The first images are of a larva of a lady beetle (Coleoptera; Coccinellidae), apparently that of the Asian multi-colored lady beetle, Harmonia axyridis - see http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi..._%28aka%29.jpg for a comparison. Unfortunately, I cannot provide a specific name for your little moth; these little buggers ('microlepidoptera') give me fits...
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