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Old 08-05-2011, 07:46 AM   #141
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Originally Posted by Texflowers View Post

The fourth one has me stumped. If anyone knows what these are, please let me know.

Russell
Maybe an Assassin bug?
Flip back to post #140 for another I.D if you missed it.
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Old 08-05-2011, 09:38 AM   #142
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Originally Posted by Texflowers View Post
I
I forget the name of the first lovebirds, but they are everywhere.

The fourth one has me stumped. If anyone knows what these are, please let me know. They are on the blooms of my Gaura "whirling butterflies" and they seem to have an impact on the blooms.
The 'lovebirds' are leaf-footed bugs (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Coreidae); possibly a Leptoglossus sp.; the ones on the Gaura appear to be stilt bugs (Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Berytidae). Most of these are plant feeders, but do not appear to cause serious harm. There are assassin bugs Hemiptera/Heteroptera: Reduviidae) in the subfamily Emesinae known as thread-legged bugs that can be quite similar in appearance except for their raptorial (grasping) front legs.
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Old 08-05-2011, 09:54 AM   #143
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I was thinking stilt bugs on the last one too but the only one My "Handy dandy field guide" listed was the spined jalysus wickhami where it stated it being a brown insect so I booted it out of the running guess. I've been doing my best at trying to identify things if I notice Suunto missing them but will usually end my guess with a ? if I'm not so sure. At least it's a lead to follow and often brings about a bit of learning into the process.

Thanks for catching the post and correcting my guess on that one Suunto.
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Old 08-05-2011, 10:22 PM   #144
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I do seem to throw a lot of bugs up here. I hope I'm not overdoing it. Anyway, here goes.
We had some torrential rains yesterday so I headed out to see what blooming might have been triggered. Among a few others was this lovely shrub, Apache Plume (Fallugia paradoxa). I've often seen the seedheads of these. They look like soft feathery brushes. Well, it's blooms are quite popular with all the hip pollinators of the desert. Some were too shy in front of the camera but I got my lens on a few.
The first two are from a picture I took of just the flower itself (or so I thought). I always try to take a clear picture of the flower, fruit and foliage of a plant to aid identification at home. That's what this was supposed to be. When I looked at it however, I saw, not one but two bees cruising through the shot. One's in the upper left and one in the lower right of the picture. The second picture is a crop showing them in more detail.
The third picture is of a lady-like beetle getting up close and personal with the pollen stash of this particular flower.
Not to be outdone, the small bug in the last two pictures gets himself nearly lost in a forest of filaments.
~Bugs on Blooms~-apache-plume-fallugia-paradoxa-11.jpg~Bugs on Blooms~-apache-plume-fallugia-paradoxa-11c.jpg~Bugs on Blooms~-apache-plume-fallugia-paradoxa-21.jpg~Bugs on Blooms~-apache-plume-fallugia-paradoxa-18.jpg~Bugs on Blooms~-apache-plume-fallugia-paradoxa-15a.jpg
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Old 08-06-2011, 07:08 AM   #145
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I do seem to throw a lot of bugs up here. I hope I'm not overdoing it.
Not at all. Photos put a face on the subject matter. I like seeing what the Apache Plume (Fallugia paradoxa) looks like, the insects that use it,
the way they retrieve nectar. Words cannot duplicate it...
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Old 08-06-2011, 08:55 AM   #146
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Bull, very nice captures!
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Old 08-06-2011, 09:19 AM   #147
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Originally Posted by Bulucanagria View Post
I do seem to throw a lot of bugs up here. I hope I'm not overdoing it. Anyway, here goes.
We had some torrential rains yesterday so I headed out to see what blooming might have been triggered. Among a few others was this lovely shrub, Apache Plume (Fallugia paradoxa). I've often seen the seedheads of these. They look like soft feathery brushes. Well, it's blooms are quite popular with all the hip pollinators of the desert. Some were too shy in front of the camera but I got my lens on a few.
The first two are from a picture I took of just the flower itself (or so I thought). I always try to take a clear picture of the flower, fruit and foliage of a plant to aid identification at home. That's what this was supposed to be. When I looked at it however, I saw, not one but two bees cruising through the shot. One's in the upper left and one in the lower right of the picture. The second picture is a crop showing them in more detail.
The third picture is of a lady-like beetle getting up close and personal with the pollen stash of this particular flower.
Not to be outdone, the small bug in the last two pictures gets himself nearly lost in a forest of filaments.
Attachment 25442Attachment 25443Attachment 25444Attachment 25445Attachment 25447
Boy - you’ve got some tough ones here - I suspect that the ‘bees’ actually could be wasps in the family Crabrionidae known as bee wolves (Philanthus sp.) - see Beewolf - Philanthus multimaculatus - BugGuide.Net for an example. I cannot see the diagnostic characters clearly on the lady beetle, but I believe that is a convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens - see http://media.sanluisobispo.com/smedi...b7.MiSt.76.jpg for an image. This is a very widespread native species. The tiny beetles could be soft-winged flower beetles (Coleoptera: Melyridae) - see http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2463/...34b89e5588.jpg for an example (not identical to yours), but there are other families of small beetles that can be found in similar situations.
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Old 08-06-2011, 11:28 AM   #148
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I don't know the bug or the bloom but here he is anyway. I'm having difficulty IDing some of the stuff I have because all my resources are geared to the East Coast, not New Mexico.

Attachment 25418Attachment 25419Attachment 25420
The flower looks like some kind of liatris to me.
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Old 08-06-2011, 08:06 PM   #149
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Boy - you’ve got some tough ones here - I suspect that the ‘bees’ actually could be wasps in the family Crabrionidae known as bee wolves (Philanthus sp.) - see Beewolf - Philanthus multimaculatus - BugGuide.Net for an example. I cannot see the diagnostic characters clearly on the lady beetle, but I believe that is a convergent lady beetle, Hippodamia convergens - see http://media.sanluisobispo.com/smedia/2011/06/08/06/38/107fb7.MiSt.76.jpg for an image. This is a very widespread native species. The tiny beetles could be soft-winged flower beetles (Coleoptera: Melyridae) - see http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2463/3638323963_34b89e5588.jpg for an example (not identical to yours), but there are other families of small beetles that can be found in similar situations.
Frankly, I'm impressed that you can even give it a ballpark shot. I included the crop shots to show the behavior that you couldn't see on the smaller sized shots that appear on the board. That you were able to do anything with them is great.
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Old 08-09-2011, 01:02 PM   #150
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I think this is a fall webworm (?) but I think it's still beautiful munching on my liatris.
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~Bugs on Blooms~-cat-liatris.jpg  
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