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Old 06-24-2010, 04:25 PM   #11
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My list is about the same as MrIlovetheants' list. Although I do not have the sedum or russian sage. I do have purple sage which is constantly being eaten. I also have a volunteer plant that smells like bell pepper that is being devoured. The millet under the bird feeder is always being skeletonized, that is why I let it be instead of pulling it out. I pretty much use that as a guide with volunteer plants that I do not know...if it is being devoured, it stays. The monardas and coreopsis' are completely covered with either bees or hover flies and the yarden looks like a fireworks display at night with the fireflies. I am also finding a lot of stag beetles either half eaten or about to be eaten all around the yard right now so they are having a good time under the ground...
Your yard sounds like an exciting place! I'm jealous. I was thinking earlier today that in spite of all the nectar serving plants, there is very little activity going on. Occasionally I will see an interesting butterfly while I'm working out there, but always they are fluttering by rather than landing. Yesterday I only saw a couple of cabbage butterflies.

On the bee front, the Asclepia incarnata is drawing a couple of honey bees, but the bumble bees aren't interested. They are interested, though, in a couple of Mediterranean sage plants that are in flower. The Monarda didyma is in flower, but I've seen nothing at it...
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Old 06-24-2010, 07:19 PM   #12
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The bumble bees don't pay much attention to the heleopsis but it has plenty of visits from small solitary bees, tiny wasps and flies.
The ratibida pinnata is just beginning to flower as well as the echinacea purpurea and E. pallida all drawing many insects.
The gallardia and veronica are covered in flying creatures. Later in the summer the gallardia attracts several beetle type creatures.
The leaves of the Joe-pye-weed have a few holes and I am seeing flower buds form. Last year it was the biggest butterfly and bee draw while in bloom although purple coneflowers are a rival.
So many plants are not yet flowering but there is plenty of activity and something for all.
The threadleaf coreopsis is blooming but I'm not seeing much insect activity there yet.
The milkweed and the liatris are still flowerless but get quite a bit of activity soon.
The native hawkweek is growing fast and looks like it will have many blooms. I'm curious as to the insects it will draw and how many flowers it will produce. It's first year here it grew slowly and did not flower at all.
We have several new plants that should bloom this year, they will be fun to observe.
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Old 06-24-2010, 07:30 PM   #13
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Jack, when we moved into this house there was little insect activity. Each year it got better as we planted more wildlife friendly. Compost and leaf mulch and woody duff have accumulated helping creatures overwinter. I am often amazed at the diversity of bird and insect life this small urban garden now supports.
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Old 06-24-2010, 07:41 PM   #14
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I have to mirror what Gloria says.
When I moved in here as a renter, there were hardly any insects outside the house but there were plenty inside. Once we bought the house and removed all the non-natives and started replacing them with natives, the insects outside were numerous and virtually non-existent inside the house. Having a good cross section of trees like the oaks, herbaceous as well as the flowering plants has created a haven for the insects outside thereby creating a smorgasbord for the birds and mammals and most recently a reptile.
As bridget1964 says, "if you plant it, they will come". She is of course referring to milkweed and monarchs but it does apply to this situation as well.
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Old 06-25-2010, 11:06 PM   #15
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Default Parthenium integrifolium

Just thought of one that I took photos of early morning. Wild Quinine, Wild Quinine (Parthenium integrifolium). It's not exactly a hub in the morning but let the day roll on and I've counted upwards of 30 different bugs on the plants before and that was in passing. Here's some photos. The flowers really are that white.
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What are your bug magnet plants?-parthenium-integrifolium.jpg   What are your bug magnet plants?-parthenium-integrifolium-close-up.jpg  
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Old 06-26-2010, 01:47 PM   #16
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Well, hopefully all of this mulch I've been laying down along with the butterfly garden I have just finished establishing will do the trick. Never one to display patience, I guess I've wanted immediate results. Finish planting and look to see a world class wildlife exhibition - that's what I wanted. I guess it will take time for the word to get out amongst all of the pollinators.
I do like hearing of the success you guys are having - it keeps my motivation level high.
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Old 06-26-2010, 10:30 PM   #17
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Quote:
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Well, hopefully all of this mulch I've been laying down along with the butterfly garden I have just finished establishing will do the trick. Never one to display patience, I guess I've wanted immediate results. Finish planting and look to see a world class wildlife exhibition - that's what I wanted. I guess it will take time for the word to get out amongst all of the pollinators.
I do like hearing of the success you guys are having - it keeps my motivation level high.

I think you hit the nail on the head: "I guess it will take time for th word to get out amongst all of the pollinators." I am thrilled at the floral display of one of the butterflyweeds I put in last year. It is huge, but I've yet to see any butterflies on it. Then again, I'm not standing there all day watching, just visiting a few times a day.

I have seen a few butterflies in the yard, but I'm hoping as I get more and more natives and spread those that I have, I'll start seeing a lot more and more varieties.

Yes, keep up your motivation.
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Old 06-28-2010, 01:04 PM   #18
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Jack, you could always plant some annuals for this season to bring on the pollinators right away! Cosmos, zinnias, bachelor buttons, borage, heliotrope, cleome, tithonia etc etc, all of these would bloom all summer and attract lots of pollinators immediately...
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Old 06-28-2010, 01:31 PM   #19
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Thanks, guys. Amazingly enough, as soon as I publicly lamented the lack of pollinators here, the A. incarnata began to get swarmed by pollinators. Not butterflies yet, but all kinds of bees and wasps, one of which is huge and probably is a paper wasp. Also, the Monarda is beginning to attract a horde. And the cardinal flowers and joe Pye weed is about to bloom here. Somehow the word got out; I guess it's true that if you plant them they will come...
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Old 06-28-2010, 03:49 PM   #20
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Actually Jack, I was outside and told all the guys and gals buzzing around the yarden to pay you a visit...if you see a Black Meadow Hawk dragonfly, tell him I said hello, I think it was my brother visiting...
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