Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening  

Go Back   Wildlife Gardeners - North American Wildlife Gardening > Wildlife Gardeners of North America Unite > Insects, Arachnids, & Gastropods

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-02-2010, 01:01 AM   #1
Co-Administrator
 
Cirsium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Midwest
Default National Pollinator Week - June 21 - 27

Quote:
The fourth annual National Pollinator Week is June 21-27, 2010!

Three years ago the U.S. Senate’s unanimous approval and designation of the final week in June as “National Pollinator Week” marked a necessary step toward addressing the urgent issue of declining pollinator populations. In just three years Pollinator Week has grown to be an international celebration of the valuable ecosystem services provided by bees, birds, butterflies, bats and beetles. The growing concern for pollinators is a sign of progress, but it is vital that we continue to maximize our collective effort.

Pollinating animals, including bees, birds, butterflies, bats, beetles and others, are vital to our delicate ecosystem, supporting terrestrial wildlife, providing healthy watershed, and more. Therefore, Pollinator Week is a weel to get the importance of pollinators’ message out to as many people as possible.
It's not too early to start thinking about an event at your school, garden, church, store, etc. Pollinators positively effect all our lives- let's SAVE them and CELEBRATE them!
Pollinator Week 2010 - Pollinator Partnership


Pollinator Week Kit 2010:
Quote:
Welcome to Pollinator Week 2010!
We have put together a variety of resources that you can use to promote your event, as well as informational materials that you can use to spread the news regarding the plight of pollinators.
http://livebinders.com/play/play?id=6493
.
__________________
"We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us.
When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect."
Aldo Leopold

Cirsium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-02-2010, 11:41 PM   #2
Unicellular Fungi
 
TheLorax's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Default

Bravo Cirsium.

Beautiful materials free for the taking. Most useful for the individual who would like to provide programming who may not have the time to create materials.
__________________
"In the end we will conserve only what we love; we will love only what we understand; we will understand only what we have been taught."
-Baba Dioum, Senegalese ecologist
TheLorax is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2010, 01:58 AM   #3
Co-Administrator
 
Cirsium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Midwest
Default

I was just looking at some of the activities that have been scheduled in some of the states and provinces.

Delaware, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Utah in the U.S., and Ontario, Canada have some interesting events scheduled:
Pollinator Week 2010 - Pollinator Partnership

This is one would be fun to attend (New Jersey):
MCSCD - Education - PlantsForPollinators
http://www.mercerscd.org/education/MCSCD_PollinatorPicnicEvents.pdf

Another interesting one (North Carolina)
Johnston County Pollinator Festival
The Owl Call Newsletter for the Howell Woods Environmental Learning Center - Johnston Community College

And one in Virginia:
http://pollinator.org/pdfs/Event%20Flier.pdf
__________________
"We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us.
When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect."
Aldo Leopold

Cirsium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2010, 08:57 AM   #4
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
Default

Thanks, Cirsium! There's a wealth of information there on a very important topic - pollinators.

I just learned that Paw Paws are often polinated by beetles and flies. That's good to know, as they often flower here when the weather is still very poor and bees are somewhat in hiding.
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-13-2010, 08:00 PM   #5
WG Contest Coordinator
 
tineckbone's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Browns Mills, NJ
Default

Thanks, Cirsium!!!
bridget1964 and I have an event for the Forsythe NWR on the 26th and I think that we are going to feature pollinators! Thanks for the info and great idea!!!
__________________
I am a long haired, tree hugging, dirt worshiping environmentalist.
tineckbone is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2010, 12:18 AM   #6
Co-Administrator
 
Cirsium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Midwest
Default

Quote:
Thanks, Cirsium! There's a wealth of information there on a very important topic - pollinators.

I just learned that Paw Paws are often polinated by beetles and flies. That's good to know, as they often flower here when the weather is still very poor and bees are somewhat in hiding.
You're welcome. There are some interesting thoughts about pollinating paw paws in this thread:
Paw Paw Pollination


Quote:
Thanks, Cirsium!!!
bridget1964 and I have an event for the Forsythe NWR on the 26th and I think that we are going to feature pollinators! Thanks for the info and great idea!!!
You're welcome. But I think the real thanks goes to you and Bridget1964! You're going to be out their spreading the word and teaching people about pollinators. I've always considered teaching to be one of the noble professions. And teaching others about the natural world is a critical need. Kudos to you and Bridget1964 for getting out there and doing it.
__________________
"We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us.
When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect."
Aldo Leopold

Cirsium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2010, 09:41 AM   #7
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
bumblebee

Following those threads, I watched one on the making of mason bee houses. Since I recently cut down that Japanese Maple but left the bole, I was thinking of drilling 5/16th holes halfway through the south facing bole. Should work unless the wood of J M turns them off.

Any thoughts?
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2010, 11:45 AM   #8
Co-Administrator
 
Cirsium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Midwest
Default

I don't see why it wouldn't work. The 5/16th inch diameter is the right size for mason bees (Osmia lignaria), but they are only one of many native bee species that use holes in trees for nesting. You can increase the pollination impact by making several different sizes of holes that will accommodate additional species of native bees. Different species of native bees are active at different times of the year, so having more species of pollinators will provide good pollination at more times of the year.
__________________
"We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us.
When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect."
Aldo Leopold

Cirsium is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2010, 12:19 PM   #9
Great Horned Owl
 
jack's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Northeastern MA
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirsium View Post
I don't see why it wouldn't work. The 5/16th inch diameter is the right size for mason bees (Osmia lignaria), but they are only one of many native bee species that use holes in trees for nesting. You can increase the pollination impact by making several different sizes of holes that will accommodate additional species of native bees. Different species of native bees are active at different times of the year, so having more species of pollinators will provide good pollination at more times of the year.
Any tips on the sizes I should make the other holes?
jack is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-14-2010, 03:16 PM   #10
Co-Administrator
 
Cirsium's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Midwest
Default

I've used 1/4, 3/16, and 1/8 inch holes with good success. I've found that a brad point bit gives the cleanest holes. Bees don't like to use holes that have a lot of "stickers" in them. Drilling perpendicular to the grain helps a lot.

The leafcutters are one of the bees that really like the 1/4 inch holes. The smaller holes get filled, but I don't know which species of bee is using them.
__________________
"We abuse land because we regard it as a commodity belonging to us.
When we see land as a community to which we belong, we may begin to use it with love and respect."
Aldo Leopold

Cirsium is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
bees, beetles, birds, butterflies, ecosystem, ecosystem balance, ecosystems, habitat, habitat conservation, june, national, national pollinator week, native bees, pollinate, pollination, pollinator, pollinator conservation, pollinator week, pollinators, week

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is Off
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -5. The time now is 12:47 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.3.2