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Old 02-09-2010, 01:05 PM   #11
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dragonfly01 In re mulching & native bees

The answer is: don't mulch every blessed square inch of your land. Mulch only some of it & leave the rest natural so the native species can do their thing there.
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Old 02-11-2010, 09:59 AM   #12
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Around here, I've noticed a drop in Bumblebees in recent years and a very noticeable increase in the big Carpenter Bees. The Carpenter Bees are everywhere the last couple years. Wild Honey Bees used to be fairly common, but I haven't seen a wild bee tree since the 1980's.

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Old 02-13-2010, 12:05 PM   #13
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dragonfly01 Die-Offs & Other Population Reductions

Bees of every kind have been dying off in massive numbers for about the past decade - along with frogs & such. Scary bcs they are the canary in every tunnel & no one knows for sure specifically what's causing these die-offs. There are some partial answers, but nothing complete. Just another way of Mother saying, "Humans - with their 'me first & to hell with everyone else' attitude - are next". The supposed 'only' animals that think just don't (think) nor do they pay attention to the elephant in the middle of the lodge, even when it pooties on them.... sigh..
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Old 02-15-2010, 01:06 AM   #14
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Chicago may not have as many bees as you would find in a less urban area but we do get bees.
Mr Brown Thumb a Chicago Garden Blogger has a video that shows the bees in action. What a great job of capturing bees in an urban garden.




Urban Bees at ChicaGarden go - Chicago Garden


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Old 02-15-2010, 02:29 PM   #15
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Totally cute bee house at
Pollinators: Bees in the garden

What a great gift from a nephew.
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Old 02-15-2010, 04:53 PM   #16
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bumblebee

Gloria,
Thanks for posting the link to the bee house. What a nifty idea.

If one were to make one of these bee houses, what drill bit size would you use to make the holes?

Any of you bee experts have any advice?
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Old 02-16-2010, 01:25 AM   #17
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That's the best bee block I've ever seen!!!
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Old 02-16-2010, 10:08 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BooBooBearBecky View Post
Gloria,
Thanks for posting the link to the bee house. What a nifty idea.

If one were to make one of these bee houses, what drill bit size would you use to make the holes?

Any of you bee experts have any advice?
This thread has some good info on bee nesting blocks:

http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...ignaria-2.html

Brad point drill bits are really helpful for getting nice clean holes in wood. Here's an example from Amazon, but they are usually available in local hardware stores or places like Menards or Home Depot.
Amazon.com: MLCS 9150 12-Inch Extra Long Brad Point Drill Bit Set, 7-Piece: Home Improvement

The longer bits are a little harder to find, so you may have to order those.
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Last edited by Cirsium; 07-31-2010 at 08:16 PM. Reason: Repaired link
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Old 02-16-2010, 04:31 PM   #19
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I'm planning on trying a bublebee house this spring. There is a similar thread called http://www.wildlifegardeners.org/for...ee-houses.html
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Old 02-16-2010, 05:30 PM   #20
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(sigh) Another thing on the to do list. I'm already working on bathouses and birdfeeders from birch logs and a couple of planters for the front steps and possibly a few Saw Whet owl boxes. Now somebody has to go and post a link to a great looking bee box. Thanks a lot!
(Everything but the last sentence was tongue-in-cheek)

Semi-related; how funny is it when people who don't know better do the bee dance (assuming they don't have a severe allergy to the stings). You know what I'm talking about; flailing about while ducking and juking like a prize-fighter. One of my former neighbors wouldn't venture out of the house without wasp-spray in his hand because we had carpenter bees in the porch ceiling. I explained to him that I ignored them and had never been stung in the several years that I had lived there. He told me that he was allergic to their sting so I commiserated and asked if he kept his epinephrine handy (so I could act accordingly if he was stung in my presence) and he said, "What's that." I explained that his doctor should have given it to him when he diagnosed his allergy. He said that he hadn't told his doctor about it. So, how did he know he was allergic. It seems that when he was stung before, the area where he had been stung got red and swollen and really hurt! So I had to explain to him that if he didn't stop spraying poison all over my home, I was going to make him eat it. He moved away soon after.
Actually, I didn't threaten him so much as I mocked him, a much milder form of violence but a bit of bullying nonetheless. It worked, though. I just have little patience for people who blindly strike out at a world they're too lazy to understand. I've been stung by bees, bitten by snakes and had a four foot iguana hanging from my thumb by his teeth. In all instances I was able to identify what I did wrong. I never considered the creature to be at fault. Guilt is an entirely human condition.
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