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Old 03-03-2009, 11:21 AM   #41
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Macroglossinae but one of the clear wings.
'

That is the right subfamily, can you guess the right tribe, genus or species?

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Old 03-03-2009, 11:24 AM   #42
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Not without looking it up. I got into moths a little bit for my moth/moon garden. I would love to have any one of those in my moth garden.
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Old 03-03-2009, 11:27 AM   #43
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Hemaris. You have to narrow it down from there. I found 17. What is their host plant?
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Old 03-03-2009, 11:49 AM   #44
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Hemaris. You have to narrow it down from there. I found 17. What is their host plant?
Larvae feed on hawthorn, honeysuckle, snowberry, viburnum.

Adults take nectar from deep-throated flowers.

You are doing pretty good so far! The first time I saw one of these last early summer, I was renovating my pond and waterfall. I thought it was a hummingbird based on the flight pattern, the way it was feeding from the flowers, and yes, the fact that it was broad daylight. I consider myself blessed to have these little visitors during the warmer months.

Good work equilbrium! The species is a little harder to nail down, but all the clues are in the photo.

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Old 03-03-2009, 12:27 PM   #45
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I believe that the moth is the hummingbird clearwing moth, Hemaris thysbe - see http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74/image/32115630
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Old 03-03-2009, 01:29 PM   #46
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I believe that the moth is the hummingbird clearwing moth, Hemaris thysbe - see http://www.pbase.com/tmurray74/image/32115630
Suunto,

Thank you, yes, you are correct! Details can be found here:

http://bugguide.net/node/view/2638

Not to be -too- nitpicky, the moth in your linked photo (and a gorgeous photo I might add!) is a different variety, as the "thysbe" has white legs.

Thanks so much everyone!

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Old 03-03-2009, 11:56 PM   #47
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Ohhhh, I was so close. I didn't catch the white legs or the white throat. I thought that was sunlight.
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Old 03-04-2009, 08:35 AM   #48
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See http://www.silkmoths.bizland.com/humming1.jpg for a Hemeris thysbe with white legs. Other species in this genus in the eastern US usually have darker legs.
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Old 03-04-2009, 10:19 PM   #49
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I missed the white. I guessed the moth as diffinis.

I have all of their larval plants.

How do you tell the male from the female?
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Old 03-05-2009, 05:11 AM   #50
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I missed the white. I guessed the moth as diffinis.

I have all of their larval plants.

How do you tell the male from the female?
This link explains:

http://www.silkmoths.bizland.com/hemaris.htm

Based on the link, I don't think these photos are conclusive.

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