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Old 04-15-2009, 11:56 PM   #1
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Default Cure For Honey Bee Colony Collapse?

Cure For Honey Bee Colony Collapse?
ScienceDaily (Apr. 14, 2009) — For the first time, scientists have isolated the parasite Nosema ceranae (Microsporidia) from professional apiaries suffering from honey bee colony depopulation syndrome. They then went on to treat the infection with complete success.

Cure For Honey Bee Colony Collapse?
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“Now that we know one strain of parasite that could be responsible, we can look for signs of infection and treat any infected colonies before the infection spreads” said Dr Higes, principle researcher.

This finding could help prevent the continual decline in honey bee population which has recently been seen in Europe and the USA.
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Old 04-16-2009, 10:22 AM   #2
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So ideas like providing a more diverse plant population near and throughout the fields and orchards , not taking the honey stores from working colonies and maybe keeping colonies near fields instead of constantly moving across country can be abandoned.
Now we don't have to bother with saving those pesky solitary bees or bumble bees that don't produce a by product we can sell from all that work?
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Old 04-16-2009, 10:27 AM   #3
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This is great news!

While I'm sure many farmers will go right back to the use of honeybees, I suspect there will also be many who now understand the risk of relying on a single type of pollinator and who will continue efforts to bring more native pollinators into their fields and orchards.

Glass half full!
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Old 04-16-2009, 11:03 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gloria View Post
So ideas like providing a more diverse plant population near and throughout the fields and orchards , not taking the honey stores from working colonies and maybe keeping colonies near fields instead of constantly moving across country can be abandoned.
Now we don't have to bother with saving those pesky solitary bees or bumble bees that don't produce a by product we can sell from all that work?
We do seem to get into these mindsets where somehow it's always better to maintain some artificial system that we've created than it is to maintain (i.e., don't destroy) the natural systems that are already in place. Perhaps it's the old advertising slogan "better living through chemistry" that gets accepted as a general truism instead of just one point of view that needs to be scrutinized and challenged.

That being said, I do think we are making progress toward increasing our awareness of the value of natural systems. The increased use of native plants and the increasing popularity of organic gardening are just two examples of where I believe we are making progress.
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Old 04-19-2009, 11:04 AM   #5
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Old ways die hard.
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Old 04-19-2009, 04:48 PM   #6
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Public radio broadcast on colony collapse:
Wisconsin Public Radio - Advanced Search
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Old 04-20-2009, 11:04 PM   #7
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Bee Learning Behavior Affected by Eating Toxin from GE Corn according to a European study, Bee Learning Behavior Affected by Eating Toxin from GE Corn. "One of the speculated contributors to this decline is transgenic crops and specifically those containing Bt proteins since these are insect-active toxins to which bees are exposed through various routes. In particular, bee larvae are exposed since they consume large quantities of pollen which they sometimes source from maize plants (Sabugosa-Madeira et al. 2007). Up to now however there has been no specific evidence that any Bt toxin has negative effects on bees, but equally such studies have been rare. Particularly lacking are studies on sub-lethal effects of Bt toxins on bees.

In the view of many, there is clear evidence from laboratory settings that Bt toxins can affect non-target organisms. Usually, but not always, affected organisms are closely related to intended targets (reviewed in Lovei and Arpaia 2005 and Hilbeck and Schmidt 2006). Typically, exposure is through the consumption of plant parts such as pollen or plant debris or through Bt ingested by their predatory food choices. Nevertheless, due to significant data gaps, the real-world consequences of Bt transgenics remains unclear."
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Old 04-22-2009, 07:34 PM   #8
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I ready that twice, EQ. I'm not sure how Bt toxin would relate to bees even the pollen. The Bt virus is specific for caterpillars, so I would think the negative effect would be on butterflies, not bees.
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Old 04-22-2009, 10:56 PM   #9
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Bt isn't a virus. It's a bacteria. Mostly lepidopterous larvae are affected but there are over150 species also affected by Bt in some way. Recent research in the US concluded the Bt proteins in GM crops showed no adverse effect on the honeybee. Who provided the research? Regardless, most GM seeds are dipped in systemic insecticides... and... they can end up in the plant's pollen and nectar. Oh the things they don't tell us.
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