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Old 07-01-2018, 02:08 PM   #11
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Amazon says I bought this 3+ years ago.

https://www.amazon.com/Bumble-Bees-N.../dp/0691152225
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Old 07-01-2018, 08:46 PM   #12
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Amazon says I bought this 3+ years ago.

https://www.amazon.com/Bumble-Bees-N.../dp/0691152225
I'm going to purchase that. Thanks!
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Old 10-26-2018, 04:04 PM   #13
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bumblebee

I think the bumble bees are done in my area for this year. We've had a few good frosts, and if that didn't do it directly the lack of any nectar and pollen has. It's been an interesting year participating in the Wisconsin Bumble Bee Brigade.
Wisconsin Bumble Bee Brigade

I've been able to document 10 species of bumble bee right here in my yard. Many years of adding native plants to the landscape has created a habitat that provides nectar and pollen all season. My surveys in other areas never produced more than 5 species in any one area.

Here's a few more of what I found:

Two-spotted (B. bimaculatus)
Honey Bees versus Native Bees-p1090537_crop.jpg


Common Eastern (B. impatiens)
Honey Bees versus Native Bees-p1100471_crop.jpg


Northern amber (B. borealis)
Honey Bees versus Native Bees-p1100484_crop.jpg


Yellow-banded (B. terricola)
Honey Bees versus Native Bees-p1110551_crop.jpg

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Old 10-26-2018, 04:38 PM   #14
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What a nice variety!
Wish I had the time to participate in such things but alas time keeps slipping by.
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Old 10-27-2018, 09:55 AM   #15
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Nice photos, NEWisc. Looks like they will be healthy and ready to propagate once again in the Spring. I wish every backyard had pollinator plants to accommodate the bees and other pollinators...
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Old 10-27-2018, 01:51 PM   #16
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I was pleasantly surprised by how many bumble bees my yard was supporting. 10 species means at least 10 nests.

I live in a rural township and my immediate surrounding area is a mix of woodland and crop fields. The woodlands provide some early flowers (trees, shrubs and spring ephemerals), but very little during the summer and fall. The crop fields provide very little if any pollen or nectar at any time. So the bulk of their continuous supply of pollen and nectar has to be coming from the native plants in my yard.

It seems to be that quantity isn't that big of an issue, it's more of a plant selection issue - getting that continuous bloom. The Fish and Wildlife Service is responsible for dealing with endangered species and they have developed a nice plant list for the Rusty Patched bumble bee:
https://www.fws.gov/midwest/endanger...bb/plants.html

That list should be a great start for any bumble bee habitat project. Two pdf downloads of good plant lists are available at the top left of that page.
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Old 10-27-2018, 03:33 PM   #17
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Interesting plant list...
Guess I'm doing pretty good here with my plant choices as I've 15 of the species listed for the rusty patched bumblebee.
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Old 10-27-2018, 04:09 PM   #18
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JNah1yXZry4
Based in California but seemed relevant to this thread. Not so much their plant recommendations, but there are plenty of other native counterparts found elsewhere in the country.
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Old 10-29-2018, 02:42 PM   #19
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Interesting plant list...
Guess I'm doing pretty good here with my plant choices as I've 15 of the species listed for the rusty patched bumblebee.
That should be some excellent food sources for your native bees! I found it interesting that both of the lists had singled out some plants with special significance.

The special plants included these symbols:
* = superfood plants with nectar rich in amino acids
! = known immune building plants for bumble bees
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Old 11-10-2018, 10:43 AM   #20
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NEWisc View Post
I was pleasantly surprised by how many bumble bees my yard was supporting. 10 species means at least 10 nests.

I live in a rural township and my immediate surrounding area is a mix of woodland and crop fields. The woodlands provide some early flowers (trees, shrubs and spring ephemerals), but very little during the summer and fall. The crop fields provide very little if any pollen or nectar at any time. So the bulk of their continuous supply of pollen and nectar has to be coming from the native plants in my yard.

It seems to be that quantity isn't that big of an issue, it's more of a plant selection issue - getting that continuous bloom. The Fish and Wildlife Service is responsible for dealing with endangered species and they have developed a nice plant list for the Rusty Patched bumble bee:
https://www.fws.gov/midwest/endanger...bb/plants.html

That list should be a great start for any bumble bee habitat project. Two pdf downloads of good plant lists are available at the top left of that page.
I recall that some years past here on WG that we had a n ongoing active survey of anyone on the site seeing a rusty patched on their property. I don't believe we ended up with even one sighting. Glad to know they are still extant! I'm doing pretty well here with that plant list for them, and I am seeing an increase in native bees in the past few years, surely due to the maturation of all of the native plantings I've started over thirty yers here on this property.
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