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Old 04-30-2012, 10:48 AM   #1
The Bug Whisperer
 
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Default This is why they are called 'sweat bees'

"A new bee is buzzing in Brooklyn: The tiny insect, the size of a sesame seed, sips the sweet nectar of the city—sweat. "They use humans as a salt lick," said entomologist John Ascher, who netted the first known specimen of the species in 2010 while strolling in Brooklyn's Prospect Park near his home. "They land on your arm and lap up the sweat."
North America is home to thousands of species of native bees. But they have long been overshadowed by imported honeybees, prized for their honey and beeswax since the time of the Pharaohs and a mainstay of commercial agriculture. Now, native bees are generating serious buzz"


New Sweat Bee Generates Buzz - WSJ.com
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:19 PM   #2
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What a place to discover a new species of bee...the middle of New York City. I have seen some very tiny bees but the size of a sesame seed is too small to even think "bee".
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:24 PM   #3
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Gosh, we were stung by these every year at summer camp in southern PA. It isn't THAT far from NYC.
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Old 04-30-2012, 12:29 PM   #4
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Even the smallest gardens---flower pots----matter to bees. That's a great article. It is encouraging to think there are so many insects thriving in a place like NYC.
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Old 04-30-2012, 01:09 PM   #5
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Everyone has some sweat bees but this newly discovered species is even smaller than the ones we are used to experiencing in summer gardens.
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Old 04-30-2012, 01:24 PM   #6
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Quote:
By latest count, about 250 species of native bees are known to nest in sidewalk cracks,
traffic median strips, parks,
and high-rise balcony flower pots—more perhaps than any other major city in the world,
several entomologists said. In Prospect Park alone, at least 90 species of native bees
flit from flower to flower among the park's sun-dappled golden rod, dandelions and dogwood.
I am so going to be looking for bee nests in sidewalk cracks this summer.
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bee, bee species, bees, called, discovery, native bees, new species, new york, new york city, pollinators, sweat, sweatbees, tiny, tiny bees, weat

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